Women and leadership: Gender barriers to senior management positions

Women and leadership: Gender barriers to senior management positions

Virginia Rincón, Miguel González, Karle Barrero

University of the Basque Country UPV-EHU (Spain)

Received October, 2016

Accepted January, 2017

Versión en español

 

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this research is to show the representation of women in corporate leadership positions. It also aims to identify the key factors that determine the lower presence of women in senior management, as well as policies to achieve gender balance in decision-making positions.

Design/methodology: In order to show the representation of women in senior positions, the information contained in the European Commission database Women and men in decision-making has been analyzed. This database contains information on the presence of women in key positions in the largest publicly-listed European companies. The analysis has been completed with the Economically Active Population Survey of the Spanish National Statistics Institute and Catalyst census, including Fortune 500 companies. A literature review was also conducted to find factors explaining the current situation of women in decision-making positions and to propose strategies that promote more women in senior management. The literature review was carried out by means of searches in Google Scholar and in the databases ABI/INFORM Global, Emerald and International Bibliography of the Social Sciences, which permitted the analysis of several journals.

Findings: This study highlights the gender imbalance in decision-making positions. Most barriers to senior management are related to gender stereotypes. Therefore, we propose combining short-term measures to provide the required support for women in order to access management positions with other long-term measures to boost analysis and the learning process throughout society.

Originality/value: The research assesses the magnitude of the gender imbalance still present in leadership positions today. It also highlights the need for short- and long-term measures.

Keywords: Leadership, Gender balance, Senior management, Career development

Jel Codes: J24, J71, M12

1. Introduction

Both gender differences and leadership are topics on which a large body of literature exists. However, the combined analysis of both phenomena has not been as common. It could be said that serious studies and scientific research in relation to this topic were first developed at the beginning of the 1970s. In this work, we intend to analyze the association of these two phenomena, focusing our interest on “female leadership”, considering both whether a special female style of leadership exists and the possible barriers that women must overcome to reach positions of maximum responsibility in organizations.

It is interesting to observe how in any auditorium, when both women and men are asked to name a leader, most people generally answer with the name of a male leader. Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela, Winston Churchill and Barrack Obama, among others, are names that are associated with the word leadership and all are male. Even though throughout history, certain women such as Joan of Arc, Marie Curie, Simone de Beauvoir and Mother Theresa have become important figures and leaders, in general, women have lacked the freedom to be able to develop their beliefs and ideas. This lack of freedom has served as an obstacle for the emergence of women with the same qualities and potential as many male leaders. “Power” belonged to men, and they took advantage of their power and freedom to implement their thoughts and ideas, both politically and economically.

Leadership is a concept that is closely related to the management or administration of organizations. According to Northouse (2012), both leadership and management involve working with people and are related to the influence over groups of individuals and to the achievement of goals. However, different authors coincide in mentioning the importance of distinguishing between the two ideas (Kent, 2005; Kotter, 1990; Northouse, 2014; Simonet & Tett, 2012, Yukl & Lepsinger, 2005). Generally speaking, while management and administration are related to discipline, order and stability, leadership is associated with creative thought, tolerance of ambiguity and the impulse to generate constructive change. This work focuses on the study of the participation of women in management positions in organizations, in which a great deal of leadership capacity is required. We will use both terms practically interchangeably, without insisting on the differences that exist between them.

It is currently a fact that women are scarcely represented in senior management positions in private companies and public institutions in the Western world, although it can also be stated that in the intermediate levels of the job ladder and in positions with a medium level of responsibility, there is a greater balance between men and women. In this work, following the approaches indicated by Hoyt (2012), we will attempt to identify the factors that can have an influence on the scarce presence of women in the upper levels of management. We will employ a thorough literature review to attempt to explain some of the reasons behind this situation.

Over the course of history, an argument that has been presented to explain the scarce presence of women leaders is that the objectives or purposes of male and female lifestyles are different. According to this idea, men have generally channeled their leadership method to focus on the task, while women have done so to focus on people or the relationship. Male task-centered leadership has been more visible, more formal and official, and female people-centered leadership, on the other hand, has been considered a leadership of support. However, it is essential to analyze whether women universally tend to “focus on relationships” in their leadership style, and whether men tend to “focus on tasks” (Eagly & Johnson, 1990; Hoyt, 2010).

In this sense, different studies have supported the hypothesis that there are gender differences in leadership styles and that leadership by women is more effective in contemporary society (Book, 2000; Helgesen, 1990; Rosener, 1995; Vecchio, 2002). Some studies maintain that women lead and direct in a more democratic and participative manner than men (Eagly & Carli, 2007; Van Engen & Willemsen, 2004). Likewise, several authors have proposed the idea that women more often and more effectively use a transformational leadership style than men (Ayman, Korabik & Morris, 2009; Eagly, Johannesen-Schmidt & Van Engen, 2003).

In the area of entrepreneurship, research has also been conducted that examines the influence of the gender variable on entrepreneurial activity (Brush, 1992; González Serrano, Valantine, Pérez Campos, Aguado Berenguer, Calabuig Moreno & Crespo Hervás, 2016; Minniti & Nardone, 2007; Ruizalba Robledo, Vallespín Arán, Martín-Sánchez & Rodríguez Molina, 2015; Ventura Fernández & Quero Gervilla, 2013). These works also reflect the existence of differences in the behavioral patterns in entrepreneurship according to gender.

In this first introductory point, we would like to suggest some important questions that arise when analyzing female leadership, whose answer or explanation should be found in our Western world. Specifically, we ask ourselves whether it is possible to universalize the idea that women have a different way of leading or one that is differentiated from that of men and, therefore, whether it is possible to identify a male and a female leadership style. Throughout this work, we will attempt to provide an answer to and reflect upon these matters.

The objectives of this research are, therefore, the following:

  • To reflect the evolution of the representation of women in the senior management positions of organizations.

  • To propose the barriers that must be overcome by women in order to access senior management, as well as the relevance of a possible female leadership style.

  • To suggest possible changes and policies aimed at increasing the female presence in management positions in organizations.

The work is divided into six parts. The following section describes the current situation of women in the senior management of organizations in the Western world. Next, we mention some of the factors that can condition this situation. In the fourth section, we present some measures that could favor the gender balance in different decision-making areas. We also dedicate a section to the debate generated by the gender quotas in decision-making bodies. The last section presents the main conclusions of this work.

 

2. Evolution in the representation of women in senior management positions

The presence of women, in both the field of education and in the world of work, has undergone substantial changes in recent decades. Currently, most women encounter no obstacles to accessing higher education, and the increase in their level of education has been noticeable in recent years. However, it must be mentioned that the preferences of men and women are still different when deciding upon higher education.

As indicated by Pons Peregort, Calvet Puig, Tura Solvas and Muñoz Illescas (2013), even though women are present at universities in greater numbers than men, in some scientific and technological degree study programs the percentage of men continues to be greater than that of women. Likewise, the Statistics on University Students from the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports for the 20142015 academic year reveal that for all degree study programs, the percentage of women is higher than that of men, but that this trend is inverted in the case of the fields of engineering and the sciences. In this sense, in the world of business administration, it is common to find businessmen who have completed technical studies, while the education of business women tends to focus more on economics, administration or sales and marketing (Junquera Cimadevilla, 2004).

The presence of women has increased not only in the field of education, their participation in the workforce has also expanded, in both lower-level positions and those with a medium level of responsibility; however, women are still poorly represented in higher positions. The study conducted by Martínez Tola, Goñi Mendizabal and Guenaga Garai (2006) reveals the scarce presence of women in leadership positions and reflects the differences that exist among different countries. In the following paragraphs we will attempt to update this information and verify the extent to which the “gender gap” separating men and women in terms of opportunities and access to management positions still continues even today. We will focus on some of the data collected for Europe and the United States.

 

2.1. Europe

The European Commission has developed a database that collects information about the participation of women in the decision-making bodies in different areas, such as politics and the economy. The aim is to provide reliable statistics on the evolution and current situation of women in different contexts. The business section of the database provides information about the gender balance in the decision-making areas of large companies in different countries. The companies considered are the major companies that are traded on the stock markets of each country. The figure below reflects the presence of women in senior management positions in the most important companies in some European countries in 2016.

 

 

Figure 1. Women in management positions in major companies in European countries, 2006-2016 (European Commission, 2016)

 

The data presented for the different countries show that during the last decade, a substantial improvement has occurred in the female presence in senior management positions in many European countries. However, in most of the countries, women still do not represent even a third of the senior management positions. It should also be stressed that the figures vary considerably, according to the country. In the Nordic countries, the situation of women in decision-making positions is generally better than in the rest of the European countries. Norway especially stands out in this regard, with 41% of women in senior administrative positions; it thus can be considered to be in an area of reasonable gender balance at the decision-making levels of large companies. Likewise, it seems important to point out the impetus towards greater gender balance in countries like France and Italy.

The report by the European Commission on the participation of men and women in leadership positions (European Commission, 2013) recognizes the importance of both political and legislative initiatives to promote the change towards a gender balance. According to this report, the most important advances in terms of the female presence in corporate leadership positions have occurred in countries that have adopted binding legislation in this regard, such as France, the Netherlands and Italy. Along the same lines, the report drafted by the European Commission on the situation of women in areas of economic decision-making (European Commission, 2012) refers to the changes in legislation adopted in France, and the positive evolution in this country.

In general, the figures on the representation of women in administrative positions in large European companies reflect that the measures adopted in the different countries have had positive results. However, even though considerable progress has been made, the average percentage of female executives in the most important companies of the European Union is still far from a situation of gender balance. Likewise, in agreement with the survey of the working population carried out by Eurostat in 2015 of all the people in the European Union in executive positions, women represented 33%, a figure that has remained practically constant since 2006 (Eurostat, 2016).

In the aforementioned database on the participation of women at different decision-making levels, the European Commission also offers information on the presence of women in positions of maximum responsibility in an organization. In 2016, only 5% of the executive director or managing director positions in the large companies in the European Union were held by women. The working document on the gender balance in corporate leadership drafted by the European Commission (2011) reveals the importance of increasing the presence of women in these positions, in order to strengthen the leadership chain and facilitate access by other women to senior management positions. This report also mentions the need to develop a bottom-up focus that ensures that women have the same opportunities as men in all stages of the executive promotions process.

At political decision-making levels, the participation of women is also lower than that of men: the female representation in the parliaments of the countries in the European Union is 28%, and the percentage of women in the governments of these countries is 27% (European Commission, 2016). The European Commission’s database on the participation of women at decision-making levels also refers to the gender balance in the judicial branch, as well as in high-level civil servant positions. According to the aforementioned database, women represent 40% of the members on the supreme judicial bodies in the countries of the European Union. In the ministries or governmental departments, 34% of the top level civil servant positions and 40% of the second highest level civil servant positions are held by women.

 

2.2. Spain

In the case of Spain, even though significant progress is evident over the last decade in terms of the presence of women in corporate leadership positions, the current situation is still far from a situation of gender balance. The following figure shows the evolution of the presence of women in senior management positions in major Spanish companies over the last ten years. Major companies were understood as those included in the IBEX 35 index.

 

 

Figure 2. Women in management positions in major Spanish companies, 2006-2016 (European Commission, 2016)

 

The data reflect an increase in the representation of women in management positions in large Spanish companies over the last decade. However, this progress has occurred relatively slowly and the presence of women in corporate leadership positions in Spanish businesses is still below the European average. This situation does not meet the objective proposed by legislation promoting equality between men and women, approved in 2007 (Ley Orgánica 3/2007), which suggests that Spanish companies should increase the representation of women on the boards of directors in order to reach a balanced presence of both men and women within a period of eight years. In this sense, albeit within the scope of collective bargaining, the authors Torres Martos and Román Onsalo (2012) also identify an insufficient impact by the regulations promoting equality between men and women.

On the other hand, if we consider the total working population in Spain, the representation of women in administration and management positions is above that observed for senior management positions in large companies. The following table shows the evolution of the participation of women in the Spanish labor market over the last five years, as well as the percentage of women in the category of directors and managers.

 

 

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

TOTAL EMPLOYED

45.37%

45.56%

45.65%

45.51%

44.89%

DIRECTORS AND MANAGERS

31.37%

30.88%

30.76%

30.21%

29.95%

Members of the executive branch and legislative bodies; directors in the Public Administration and organizations of social interest; executive directors

32.26%

29.05%

25.94%

29.13%

28.83%

Administrative and sales and marketing department managers

36.73%

32.19%

33.64%

33.67%

33.65%

Production and operations directors

25.75%

27.35%

26.82%

25.04%

23.58%

Directors and managers of hotel, restaurant and retail establishments

34.11%

32.44%

32.69%

31.06%

31.87%

Directors and managers of other service companies not included in any other category

30.95%

35.61%

34.16%

35.93%

37.24%

Table 1. Presence of women in the working population and in the category of directors and managers, 2011-2015 (Spanish National Statistics Institute, 2016a)

 

In quantitative terms, it can be said that there are practically no differences between men and women in terms of participation in the labor market, with more than 45% of women among the working population in Spain. This high percentage is not reflected, however, in management positions, in which women represent slightly more than one third. While it is true that the presence of women in this category is higher than that observed for senior management in large Spanish companies, it is also evident that it does not match the data on the participation of women in the labor market.

The works by Martínez Tola et al. (2006) and by Martínez Tola (2009) reflect that the presence of women in management positions increases as the size of the company decreases; they also make special reference to the presence of female directors in companies without any salaried staff. Similarly, Junquera Cimadevilla (2004) mentions a lower percentage of business women in companies with salaried staff. According to these authors, the gender differences in leadership positions are more noticeable as the size of the companies increases, and therefore the size of the business is an essential variable when analyzing the presence of women in management positions.

With regard to the political realm, according to the information collected in the European Commission’s database on the participation of women at decision-making levels, the percentage of women in the Spanish parliament is currently 39%, and the percentage of women in the government is 25%. In the judicial branch, even though the representation of women on the Supreme Court is 13%, a total of 52% of the members of the judicial service and 43% of the members of the General Council of the Judiciary are women (Institute of Women and Equal Opportunities, 2016). Furthermore, in the highest level positions of the General Government Administration, women represent 35% of all civil servants (European Commission, 2016). Likewise, the percentage of female executives and managers in the public sector is 41%, as compared to 30% in the private sector (Spanish National Statistics Institute, 2016b).

Therefore, in the political realm and in the public administrations, as compared to large Spanish companies, a generally more balanced representation is seen between men and women in leadership positions. This may be linked to regulations on electoral quotas and the fact that the professional career and access to certain positions in the public administration are regulated through objective exams (Ramos, 2005).

 

2.3. United States

The situation is similar in other countries in the Western world, such as the United States, where women represent 16.9% of the managerial positions in the country’s major companies and 4% of the positions of maximum responsibility in said companies (Catalyst Knowledge Center, 2016a, 2016b).

In the case of the United States, the non-profit organization Catalyst conducts an annual census in order to show the representation of women in senior management positions in the country’s main companies. The population of said census is made up by companies on the Fortune 500 list, as besides being the largest companies in terms of turnover in the United States, they are also widely recognized as the most powerful and influential companies. Even though the information collected in this census is not entirely comparable to that presented above for European countries, it gives us an idea about the situation of women in corporate leadership positions in the United States. The following figure presents data on the participation of women in the management positions of the main U.S. companies over the last ten years.

 

 

Figure 3. Women in management positions in major U.S. companies, 2003-2013 (Catalyst Knowledge Center, 2016a)

 

According to the data presented, it can be said that the progress made in terms of the presence of female executives in large U.S. companies is occurring at a very slow pace. The participation of women in executive positions in the most important companies in the United States during 2013 was 16.9%, showing barely any improvement over the previous year, in which the percentage of women in senior management positions was 16.6%.

As occurs in the case of Spain, the figures for the representation of women in senior management in the most important companies in the United States do not match the data on the participation of women in the labor market, nor do they correspond to the percentage of women in the executive category. Statistics on the U.S. labor market reflect that during 2015, women represented 46.8% of the total working population and the percentage of women in the management and professional category was 51.5% (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2016).

In senior positions in U.S. politics, the representation of women is also lower than that of men. During 2016, women held 19.6% of the seats in the United States Congress and 30.4% of the positions in the federal government. On the state level, women represented 24.4% of the members of the legislative branch and 24% of the executive positions overall in the 50 states (Center for American Women and Politics, 2016).

In the United States, as in the European Union, the representation of women is higher in leadership positions in the field of politics than in senior management in the economic sector. However, as compared to Spain and other countries in the European Union, the increase in the participation of women in management positions in large companies in the United States has occurred very slowly. In recent years, the increase in women executives in the main U.S. companies has been moderate, while the percentage of women in senior management positions in the most important companies in the European Union has doubled. In this sense, special mention should be made of the level of commitment shown by some of the countries in the European Union to achieve a greater balance at decision-making levels, as well as the effectiveness of the measures adopted.

 

3. Gender barriers to senior management

The data presented clearly show the scarce presence of women in management positions in the main European and U.S. companies. The participation of women in senior management positions in large companies is far below that of men, and it can be said that in the business sector, there is still a long way to go before gender balance is reached. In this section, we conduct a bibliographic review and suggest some factors that may be conditioning this situation of gender imbalance at the highest levels of business administration and management.

We carried out the review of the literature based primarily on searches in Google Scholar and in the ABI/INFORM Global, Emerald and International Bibliography of the Social Sciences databases, which enabled different journals to be examined. During the search, we use terms such as leadership, management, leadership theory, leadership styles, transformational leadership, women, gender, female, discrimination, gender gap and glass ceiling, in both English and Spanish. Among the different studies obtained, we selected those that contributed to a greater extent to reaching the objectives proposed in this work. In this sense, we analyzed studies related to the leadership styles of men and women, along with gender stereotypes and obstacles faced by women in order to reach leadership positions. We completed the recompilation with a review of the bibliography included in the selected studies.

One of the expressions most commonly used to explain the reasons for the low representation of women in management positions is the metaphor of the glass ceiling. This term was made popular in 1986 in an article published in the Wall Street Journal on women executives (U.S. Glass Ceiling Commission, 1995). According to this concept, women are confronted with a set of invisible and impenetrable barriers as they get closer to the top positions in the corporate hierarchy.

In 1991, the U.S. Department of Labor defined the glass ceiling as a set of artificial obstacles based on arbitrariness that prevent qualified individuals from being promoted to management positions in their organization (U.S. Department of Labor, 1991). The report drafted in 1995 by the Commission in charge of identifying these obstacles mentioned three levels of barriers: social barriers, such as prejudices and gender stereotypes; organizational barriers, such as those related to selection processes or the corporate culture; and governmental barriers, such as a lack of committed monitoring of legal compliance (U.S. Glass Ceiling Commission, 1995). This report stresses that these barriers contradict one of the most important beliefs in American society: that education, dedication and hard work lead to a better life. In terms of corporate competitiveness, it also recognizes that diversity in senior management and the elimination of the glass ceiling would benefit companies.

Even though the metaphor of the glass ceiling enables us to clearly see the problem of gender imbalance in the senior management of organizations, we believe that it may have some limitations. This concept is based on the hypothesis that both men and women have the same possibilities to access certain positions, until women encounter an invisible barrier that is difficult to overcome, and which men do not encounter throughout their careers. Currently, while some women access positions of great responsibility in organizations, the path they must take to reach these positions is complicated and implies overcoming a great number of difficulties. The idea of the glass ceiling supposes a single, homogeneous barrier at the highest professional levels and ignores the complexity and diversity of the obstacles that women in high positions must face (Carli & Eagly, 2016; Eagly & Carli, 2007). The metaphor of the labyrinth of leadership, on the other hand, shows that access to leadership positions, especially for women, represents a series of obstacles that form part of a process and that are the reason behind the poor representation of women in senior management in businesses and organizations.

Hoyt (2012) refers to the labyrinth of leadership and proposes a classification of the different types of barriers that complicate access by women to higher level positions. According to this author, the factors explaining the under-representation of women in executive positions can be classified into one of three large groups: those related to human capital, those related to gender differences and those linked to prejudices. This classification makes it possible to present in a structured manner the set of obstacles that must be faced by women who access senior management. Taking into account this grouping, in the following paragraphs, we will attempt to suggest the reasons or barriers that might explain the lesser presence of women in leadership positions.

 

3.1. Human capital

The focal point of the theory of human capital is that by investing in themselves, individuals succeed in increasing their production capacities. The main sources of investment in human capital are education, training and work experience. According to this theory, one of the factors that complicates the job promotion of women is their smaller investment in human capital (Barberá Heredia, Ramos, Sarrió & Candela, 2002; Jacobs, 1999). This approach suggests that many women, who do not have time available outside working hours to invest in training, are excluded from job promotion. Similarly, it is usually women who interrupt their professional careers or work part time in order to take care of their families, which means they have fewer years of work experience and more interruptions, which slows down their professional progress (Eagly & Carli, 2004; 2007; Hoyt, 2010; Keith & McWilliams, 1999; Pons Peregort et al., 2013).

Different studies have indicated that there is a negative relationship between decisions regarding fertility and the participation of women in the labor market (Alonso Antón, Fernández Sainz & Rincón Diez, 2015; Álvarez-Llorente, 2002; Álvarez Llorente & Otero Giráldez, 2006; Ariza & Ugidos, 2007; Carrasco, 2001; Davia & Legazpe, 2014; De la Rica & Ferrero, 2003). The research conducted by Kaufman and Uhlenberg (2000) reveals the influence of traditional gender roles on the participation of men and women in the job market. According to this study, women with children are less likely to participate in the labor market than women without children, and those who do participate do so for fewer hours. Men with children, on the other hand, show a greater tendency to participate in the labor market and to work more hours than men without children. Along the same lines, Sánchez Sellero and Sánchez Sellero (2013) confirm that the increase in family size reduces the probability of being employed by others in the case of women, while this probability remains unchanged for men.

In an analysis of the division of household responsibilities and child care, Biernat and Wortman (1991) studied the presence of traditional gender roles in some spheres of life of professional women. According to these authors, in spite of the traditional inequality in the division of chores, women are more self-critical than men.

On many occasions, when faced with the difficulty of combining their work and personal lives, women decide to cut back on their professional responsibilities and interrupt their professional career or choose part-time jobs (Bowles & McGinn, 2005). However, women who do decide to rejoin the workforce often encounter difficulties that prevent them from returning to their posts, and are sometimes forced to accept a lower post than that which they originally had, which complicates their job promotion to a great extent (Belkin, 2003; Ehrlich, 1989; Nieva & Gutek, 1981; Wadman, 1992).

Soler i Blanch and Moreno Pérez (2013) propose that companies which implement measures aimed at favoring the balance between personal and professional time obtain positive results for both employees and the organization. This type of measures make it possible for both men and women to juggle their work life and other activities of their personal life, such as childcare and household chores.

On the other hand, women, possibly due to prejudices regarding their experience in work situations, usually have fewer opportunities for development than men and fewer incentives at an organizational level, the importance of which is also essential in terms of self-promotion (Fernández Palacín, López Fernández, Maeztu Herrera & Martín Prius, 2010; Hoyt, 2010; Powell & Graves, 2003; Ramos, Barberá & Sarrió, 2003).

With regard to the investment in education, it can be said that the situation is balanced at all educational levels. In the case of higher education, which is more closely related to higher decision-making positions, in many countries women enjoy an advantage over men (Barberá Ribera, Estellés Miguel & Dema Pérez, 2009). Currently in Spain, in quantitative terms, no differences in the educational level are evident between men and women, however, the proportion of women in senior management positions continues to be lower (European Commission, 2016; Spanish National Statistics Institute, 2016a; Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports, 2016).

Taking into account all of the above, it can be stated that the differences in work behaviors originate in the maintenance of stereotypical gender roles and functions (Barberá Heredia et al., 2002). The traditional focus on the division of work, according to which the responsibility for caring for the family falls on women, represents an important barrier to their professional advancement. These gender roles, present in the corporate culture of many companies, establish that women should take primary responsibility for taking care of their families, and thus questions are raised, especially in senior management, about whether it is possible to fulfill this role alongside a professional career. As a result, women receive fewer offers for management positions and less preparation for said positions (De Luis Carnicer, Martínez Sánchez & Pérez Pérez, 2003; European Commission, 2011).

 

3.2. Gender differences

The focus based on gender differences suggests that women and men have different leadership-related traits that can explain the reduced presence of women in higher decision-making positions. In accordance with this idea, women are not represented in senior positions due to the differences in leadership styles between men and women. In general, the traits associated with men have been more highly valued for leadership positions. However, different authors indicate that effective leadership requires a combination of characteristics associated with both men and women, such as emotional intelligence, risk-taking, empathy, integrity or the capacity to persuade, motivate and inspire people, among others (Eagly & Carli, 2003; 2007; Fernández Palacín et al., 2010; Hoyt, 2010; Powell, 1990; Vecchio, 2002).

Taking into account the gender differences in the division of household responsibilities, it has been suggested that women are less motivated to seek out leadership positions, thus explaining their scarce presence in senior positions. Nonetheless, several authors claim that women and men show the same level of commitment to their jobs and the same motivation towards seeking out leadership positions (Bielby & Bielby, 1988; Eagly & Carli, 2007; Hoyt, 2010; Thoits, 1992).

According to Bowles and McGinn (2005), the main gender differences in relation to leadership occur in the demand by men and women for executive positions. In general, men demand and keep a greater number of leadership positions than women. Women are less likely to initiate negotiations to access the desired positions and opportunities and generally have greater social costs than men when they do (Babcock & Laschever, 2003; Bowles, Babcock & Lai, 2007; Small, Gelfand, Babcock & Gettman, 2007).

In human resource selection and promotion processes, men receive better scores than women for management positions, since as a general rule, leadership is linked to traits associated with masculinity (Fernández Palacín et al., 2010; Northouse, 2012; Powell, Butterfield & Parent, 2002). When women challenge social norms and try to access leadership positions, a certain contradiction occurs between traditional leadership and gender roles, and they often must face social rejection (Bowles & McGinn, 2005; Eagly & Karau, 2002; García-Retamero & López-Zafra, 2006; Hoyt & Blascovich, 2007; Rudman, 1998; Rudman & Glick, 2001).

Moreover, the effectiveness of the leadership depends on the attitude of the followers towards the leader, and in the case of female leaders, the followers are usually reluctant to accept the influence of a person who does not match the ideal image of a leader (Hoyt, 2010). As a result, men are more likely to assume an official position as a leader, while women usually adopt informal leadership roles, such as that of a facilitator, organizer or coordinator (Andrews, 1992; Bowles & McGinn, 2005; Eagly & Karau, 1991; Fletcher, 2001).

Research on female and male leadership styles reflects that women are no less effective than men when performing leadership tasks (Hoyt, 2012). Furthermore, it has not been observed that they are any less motivated to perform leadership functions or less committed to their jobs than men. However, when they attempt to access upper level positions, they must often confront gender stereotypes and shoulder the social dissent that this implies.

 

3.3. Prejudices

In line with the above, it can be stated that the barriers that most complicate the job promotion of women are those related to prejudices and stereotypical gender expectations. A stereotype is a set of beliefs about the characteristics of a group of people, regardless of the real diversity in the traits of those people (Hamilton, Stroessner & Driscoll, 1994; Heilman, 1997; Powell, 2011). In addition to influencing perceptions of the general characteristics of men and women, gender stereotypes also indicate the appropriate traits and behaviors they should have (Burgess & Borgida, 1999; Eagly, 1987; Eagly & Karau, 2002; García-Ael, Cuadrado & Molero, 2012; Heilman, 2001; Prentice & Carranza, 2002; Rudman, Moss-Racusin, Phelan & Nauts, 2012). With regard to the characteristics associated with leadership, stereotypes still persist that establish that women take care of and assist people, while men take control and focus on the task (Heilman, 1997; Hoyt, 2012).

The social role theory of gender attributes the differences in the behavior of men and women to the different social functions that they have traditionally performed (Eagly, 1987). According to this theory, in a certain productive social structure, people take on different gender roles and are coherent with the requirements of said roles. Accordingly, men would have individualistic values and agent-instrumental traits linked to assertiveness and domination, due to the practice of traditional roles that have developed in society. Women, in turn, would have collectivist values and expressive-communal traits related to the concern for others, derived from the functions that are usually associated with them (Cuadrado, 2004; García-Ael et al., 2012; Martínez Tola et al., 2006). Through role assignment, the skills and motivations of men and women are oriented towards these stereotypes (García-Leiva, 2005).

Taking into account gender stereotypes, it is possible to match different leadership styles with men and women. Stereotypically masculine traits are associated with an authoritarian, managerial and task-focused leadership style, and stereotypically feminine traits are linked to a democratic, participative leadership style focused on interpersonal relations (Eagly & Johnson, 1990; Fridell, Newcom Belcher & Messner, 2009; Gartzia & Van Engen, 2012; Oakley, 2000; Post, 2015; Powell, 2011; Van Engen & Willemsen, 2004). Along the same lines, a transformational leadership style, based on aspects such as the motivation, guidance, stimulation and training of followers, is associated with the way women lead (Barberá Heredia & Ramos López, 2004; Dodd, 2012; Evans, 2010; Hoyt, 2010; Trinidad & Normore, 2005).

Different authors have associated a transformational leadership style, frequently used by women, with greater effectiveness in leadership (Brandt & Edinger, 2015; Burke & Collins, 2001; Eagly et al., 2003; Van Engen & Willemsen, 2004). Furthermore, the current globalized economic context in constant change seems to demand a transformational style of leadership. In this sense, several authors mention its suitability in the environment of extreme competitiveness and uncertainty in which organizations operate, which demands participative, flexible structures capable of innovation and adapting quickly to changes (Powell, 2011; Psychogios, 2007; Ramos et al., 2003; Rosener, 1990; Tuuk, 2012).

However, current data on the participation of women in senior management continues to reflect a considerable gender imbalance. Women continue to face prejudices and negative expectations about their leadership capacity (Hoyt, 2010). Some authors associate a more participative and democratic female leadership style with credibility problems that women face when trying to employ a hierarchical and authoritarian leadership style (Carli, 2001; Eagly & Johannesen-Schmidt, 2001; Ridgeway, 2001). In general, women face greater resistance than men when they try to exercise leadership, especially when they use styles that go against traditional gender roles. The research conducted by Schein (2001) reflects that, in the different countries analyzed, the qualities necessary to hold management positions are associated with men, regardless of which traits are perceived as masculine or feminine in the different cultures. In other words, even though the characteristics required for corporate success vary from one country to another, these characteristics are still considered to be primarily associated with men.

Cultural differences do not seem to affect the perception of women as less likely to have the traits required for corporate leadership, and this represents an important obstacle for their career development in management positions. Among other aspects, from a psycho-sociological perspective, stereotypes can exert a profound influence on the behavior of the people they affect (Steele, Spencer & Aronson, 2002). In other words, the mere interpretation of the capacities or behavior of people can significantly influence the way they act (Kray, Thompson & Galinsky, 2001; Sekaquaptewa & Thompson, 2003). In the case of female leadership, the traditional gender stereotypes that suggest that women do not have the required characteristics for leadership, besides influencing the attitude of their followers as indicated earlier, can also negatively affect the behavior and career development of female leaders.

According to Rudman et al. (2012), gender stereotypes serve to reinforce the gender hierarchy that assigns higher status to men, as well as greater access to power and resources. These authors propose that behaviors which challenge this gender hierarchy are censured and women who present the stereotypically masculine traits required for promotion in most high-status professions run the risk of being economically and socially sanctioned.

Along these same lines, Heilman (2001) proposes that gender prejudices and stereotypes explain the scarcity of women in upper level positions in organizations. According to the views of this author, the descriptive and prescriptive dimensions of these stereotypes produce different types of prejudices. The descriptive aspects, which indicate what women are like, and their discrepancy with what an upper level management position implies, promote the idea that women cannot perform this type of work effectively. Prescriptive aspects, which dictate how women should behave, can lead to social rejection when they prove to be competent. In short, gender stereotypes can halt or hinder to a great extent the career development of women in senior management, given that when any ambiguity exists about their competence, they are likely to be judged as incompetent and when their competence is beyond reproach, they run the risk of being penalized socially.

 

4. Strategies aimed at achieving gender balance in leadership positions

In line with the view of Pons Peregort et al. (2013), we understand that the barriers that prevent women from accessing positions of great responsibility in both public and private organizations represent a considerable cost for all of society, which has invested in the training and preparation of these people. The imbalance between the high educational level of women and their career development implies a waste of abilities and human resources in a global economy where human capital constitutes a key factor for competitiveness (European Commission, 2011).

From a corporate perspective, several studies confirm that organizations which take advantage of diversity in upper level management positions can obtain better performance (Cox & Smolinski, 1994; European Commission, 2011; Nielsen & Huse, 2010; Post & Byron, 2015; U.S. Glass Ceiling Commission, 1995; Wittenberg-Cox & Maitland, 2009). Nielsen and Huse (2010) analyzed a group of Norwegian companies and confirmed that there is a positive relationship between the proportion of women directors in a company and its effectiveness. Cox and Smolinski (1994) present diversity in work groups as an important economic opportunity, as it allows competitive advantages to be obtained in the areas of marketing, creativity and problem solving, and it favors better performance of the organizations. In this sense, Forsyth (2010) suggests the variety of experiences, knowledge, perspectives and ideas that diversity provides work groups and mentions a greater capacity to identify new strategies and solutions in heterogeneous groups. According to Wittenberg-Cox and Maitland (2009), given the complexity and diversity of the current global market, companies that recognize the potential of women in senior management can obtain an advantage over the rest.

Therefore, it would seem, from a strictly economic perspective, that it is beneficial for both companies and society as a whole to promote equal opportunities for the career development of all people. Along these lines, there are multiple measures that can contribute to eliminating gender barriers and achieving a balanced representation of men and women in leadership positions.

Companies that are aware of the benefits that can be provided by the participation of women in senior leadership positions try to implement policies oriented towards reaching a gender balance in these positions. In this regard, some changes, such as flexible scheduling or work calendars that permit greater compatibility between one’s work and personal life, can favor access by women to leadership positions (Cooper & Lewis, 1999). When proposing a model of compatibility and flexibility, it is important to prevent these policies from being seen as exclusively oriented towards women. It is a matter of improving work conditions for both men and women so that they can engage in other activities in their personal life without having to sacrifice their careers.

Likewise, actions aimed at providing the support necessary for women so they can access management positions, especially with regard to those aspects in which organizations currently have the greatest shortcomings, such as the building of professional networks and guidance in career development, can favor the gender balance in upper level corporate positions within companies. It is essential to offer women adequate preparation for leadership positions, through training and practical experience. This type of actions contribute to making women visible and including them in the promotional channels, and increase the likelihood that their skills and talents will be taken advantage of. In this manner, companies committed to diversity send a positive message both inside and outside the organization, especially to highly qualified women who can access management positions. It is also important for the implemented action or change plans to be evaluated. Among other aspects, it is a good idea to measure the perception of women regarding the usefulness of the training plans or improvements in development options.

We believe that the public administrations play an important role in making companies aware of the benefits that gender diversity can provide on management teams. It is crucial for governments to establish policies to persuade the corporate sector of the importance of improving career development opportunities for women. In this sense, in recent years, public administrations have carried out different initiatives aimed at supporting women in accessing executive positions (European Commission, 2011). Besides campaigns to introduce gender perspective in human resource management, build professional networks and provide guidance for career development, it is important to stress codes of good corporate governance, and in the case of some countries, even legislation that establishes a minimum percentage of women at the decision-making levels of organizations. Likewise, all measures aimed at business entrepreneurship by women represent an important advance in the participation of women in leadership positions (Wirth, 2001).

The policies adopted by some countries in the European Union to promote gender balance, as reflected by the data presented in the second section, have had a considerable impact. The case of Norway, which establishes by law a minimum representation of 40% women on the boards of directors of companies, is especially remarkable (European Commission, 2011; Matsa & Miller, 2013). These quota regulations affect both companies in the public and private sector and any failure to comply with them can result in sanctions and even the liquidation of the companies affected (European Commission, 2012). Following the Norwegian model, some countries such as France, Italy and Belgium also apply quota laws that carry sanctions in cases of non-compliance. In Spain, regulations to achieve gender balance in management positions are less strict and do not include any sanctions (Ley Orgánica 3/2007).

However, even though gender equality policies have been extended to promote the access of women to positions of power, improvements in this area have occurred at a very slow pace. In this regard, it is important to stress that a large number of the obstacles mentioned in this work are closely related to gender stereotypes and the expectations that these generate about what women are like and how they should behave. Specifically, it has been indicated that stereotypical gender roles produce certain workplace behaviors, and in some cases, a corporate culture that is less oriented towards the career development of women. Likewise, women must deal with prejudices regarding their leadership ability, and on many occasions when they access upper level positions, they run the risk of being economically and socially sanctioned. As indicated, it is a matter of beliefs and attitudes firmly established in society that can constitute one of the most obstinate obstacles to the personal and career development of people, and which are not quickly transformed.

The elimination of prejudices that prevent the access of women to leadership positions requires the adoption of structural measures, the impact of which is only noticeable over the medium to long term. It is essential to promote a reflection that delves deeper into the processes that cause situations of imbalance and that proposes new ways of confronting them. The transformation of gender stereotypes also involves a learning process on the part of all of society that can be promoted, among other ways, by incorporating gender perspective at the different levels of the educational system, in the media and in the workplace.

Therefore, in order to accelerate the change from a situation of imbalance that affects all of society, we propose the need to intensify all the actions to incorporate a gender focus in areas of power over the short term. At the same time, it is important to promote a deeper process of reflection and learning that enables progress to be made in eliminating the barriers related to gender stereotypes that complicate the career development of women. Research, especially in the area of the humanities and social sciences, can enhance this analysis process and provide solutions that make it possible to attain greater social well-being. We believe that better comprehension of the factors that hinder the gender balance represents a step towards possible solutions to achieving it (Eagly & Carli, 2007; Hoyt, 2010). In this same sense, education that includes gender perspective can be a determining factor in transforming the perceptions of society and making progress towards the construction of a fairer social model.

 

5. Controversy surrounding gender quotas in decision-making bodies

Among the measures aimed at achieving a balanced representation at decision-making levels over the short term, some of the most controversial are those that establish a quota or minimum percentage of women in the decision-making bodies of organizations. Generally, legislation on gender quotas is aimed at larger companies and is implemented alongside other voluntary measures intended to stimulate the career development of women. The countries that have adopted binding legislation in this sense have shown considerable advances in matters of gender balance (European Commission, 2013).

However, there is an opposite view to this system, which argues that this type of measures contradict the principle of equal opportunities and prioritize diversity over knowledge and experience. According to this idea, gender quotas are unnecessary, given that qualified women can access positions of power on their merits alone. Quite the opposite, the posture that defends a gender quota system suggests the need to transform a reality in which the level of qualification of women and their presence in leadership positions are not balanced in the least.

As mentioned throughout this work, women who try to access leadership positions must overcome a set of barriers that complicate to a large extent the gender balance at decision-making levels. This situation prevents taking advantage of the abilities and talent of women whose level of qualification is currently equal to that of men. Many of the gender obstacles which women must overcome are not easy to identify and some require long-term measures and time in order to be permanently eliminated. While it obviously does not eliminate gender barriers, the quota system can serve to compensate over the short term for what is initially an unequal situation that represents an important cost for all of society. Furthermore, even though the effect of these measures can be appreciated primarily over the short term, the greater presence of women in leadership positions can also contribute to generating reference models for other younger women and to transforming traditional gender stereotypes (European Commission, 2011; Pons Peregort et al., 2013).

 

6. Conclusions

The present work shows the situation of gender imbalance in corporate leadership positions in Western countries. Currently, even though women have the same level of preparation as men, they are still less present in senior management positions. The scarce representation of women in senior decision-making positions in large companies throughout different countries demonstrates that the current situation is far from a situation of gender balance.

Among the barriers that hinder the participation of women in senior management, we have detected those related to gender stereotypes and the prejudices they generate. In this sense, we have mentioned that stereotypical gender roles produce differences in certain workplace behaviors of both men and women, which can result in a corporate culture that is less oriented towards the career development of women. As a result, women often have fewer opportunities and incentives for promotion on an organizational level than men. Likewise, expectations about what women are like and how they should act often call into question their leadership ability and can socially and economically penalize women who access executive positions.

A great deal of the research on leadership styles links women to a democratic, participative leadership style focused on personal relations. Likewise, several studies mention the tendency for women to use a transformational leadership style, which is often related to more effective leadership. However, some authors defend that this type of female leadership owes to the negative reactions and the social rejection that women must face when they use a directive and authoritarian leadership usually associated with men. In any case, current data on gender balance in management positions show that the effectiveness of supposedly female leadership does not seem to be important enough to overcome the obstacles that complicate access by women to positions of responsibility.

This scarce presence of women in upper management positions represents an important cost for society as a whole. The imbalance between the educational level of women and their career development implies a waste of human resources that prevents taking advantage of the talent and abilities of highly qualified people. Furthermore, in terms of business competitiveness, organizations with low numbers of women represented in senior management positions are foregoing benefits that gender diversity can provide for managerial teams.

For all of the above reasons, we believe that it is essential to increase awareness in the corporate sector of all the advantages there are of increasing the participation of women in senior management positions. The intensification of measures aimed at improving opportunities for the career development of women can accelerate change towards a situation of gender balance that would benefit all of society. All actions aimed at promoting the compatibility between one’s personal and professional life, as well as those focused on providing women the support they need for leadership positions, can produce positive results.

Likewise, it seems important to combine these measures with other more long-term measures aimed at eliminating prejudices that hinder access by women to decision-making levels. In this regard, we suggest increasing efforts dedicated to attaining greater knowledge of all the processes that result in situations of gender imbalance. We also propose the need to incorporate gender perspective in different contexts, such as education and the workplace, in order to be able to transform the social perceptions that prevent women from accessing executive positions. In short, it is a matter of promoting, from both the field of research and of education, a process of reflection and learning on the part of all of society that would enable progress to be made in building a fairer social model, and thus attaining greater social wellbeing.

Finally, in terms of future lines of research, we propose an analysis of the effectiveness of the different measures aimed at increasing the presence of women in executive positions. Likewise, with regard to the proposed recommendations, we believe it is essential to delve deeper into the social and cultural processes that prevent a permanent transformation towards gender equality in our society. Besides studying the way in which gender stereotypes are constructed that hinder the job promotion of women, it is crucial to identify the discourse logic behind said prejudices and social norms and the possible causes for their persistence.

References

Alonso Antón, A., Fernández Sainz, A., & Rincón Diez, V. (2015). Análisis de la actividad femenina y la fecundidad en España mediante modelos de elección discreta. Lecturas de Economía, 82, 127-157.

Álvarez-Llorente, G. (2002). Decisiones de fecundidad y participación laboral de la mujer en España. Investigaciones Económicas, 26(1), 187-218.

Álvarez Llorente, G., & Otero Giráldez, M.S. (2006). Abandono de la actividad empresarial en España: Un enfoque de género. Revista Europea de Dirección y Economía de la Empresa, 15(4), 69-86.

Andrews, P.H. (1992). Sex and gender differences in group communication: Impact on the facilitation process. Small Group Research, 23(1), 74-94. https://doi.org/10.1177/1046496492231005

Ariza, A., & Ugidos, A. (2007). Entrada a la maternidad: Efecto de los salarios y la renta sobre la fecundidad. Revista actualidad, 16, 1-30.

Ayman, R., Korabik, K., & Morris, S. (2009). Is transformational leadership always perceived as effective? Male subordinates’ devaluation of female transformational leaders. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 39(4), 852-879. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-1816.2009.00463.x

Babcock, L., & Laschever, S. (2003). Women don’t ask: Negotiation and the gender divide. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Barberá Heredia, E., & Ramos López, A. (2004). Liderazgo y discriminación de género. Revista de Psicología General y Aplicada, 57(2), 147-160.

Barberá Heredia, E., Ramos, A., Sarrió, M., & Candela, C. (2002). Más allá del techo de cristal. Revista del Ministerio de Trabajo y Asuntos Sociales, 40, 55-68.

Barberá Ribera, T., Estellés Miguel, S., & Dema Pérez, C.M. (2009). Obstáculos en la promoción profesional de las mujeres: El “techo de cristal”. 3rd International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Industrial Management, XIII Congreso de Ingeniería de Organización, Barcelona-Terrassa.

Belkin, L. (2003). The opt-out revolution. New York Times Magazine, October 26.

Bielby, D.D., & Bielby, W.T. (1988). She works hard for the money: Household responsibilities and the allocation of work effort. American Journal of Sociology, 93(5), 1031-1059. https://doi.org/10.1086/228863

Biernat, M., & Wortman, C.B. (1991). Sharing of home responsibilities between professionally employed women and their husbands. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 60(6), 844-860. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.60.6.844

Book, E.W. (2000). Why the Best Man for the Job is a Woman. New York: HarperCollins.

Bowles, H.R., Babcock, L,. & Lai, L. (2007). Social incentives for gender differences in the propensity to initiate negotiations: Sometimes it does hurt to ask. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 103, 84-103. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.obhdp.2006.09.001

Bowles, H.R., & McGinn, K.L. (2005). Claiming authority: Negotiating challenges for women leaders. In D.M. Messick & R.M. Kramer, The psychology of leadership: New perspectives and research. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Brandt, T.M., & Edinger, P. (2015). Transformational leadership in teams - the effects of a team leader’s sex and personality. Gender in Management: An International Journal, 30(1), 44-68. https://doi.org/10.1108/GM-08-2013-0100

Brush, C.G. (1992). Research on women business owners: Past trends, a new perspective and future directions. Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 16(4), 5-30.

Bureau of Labor Statistics (2016). Current Population Survey, 2015. Retrieved from: http://www.bls.gov/cps/tables.htm. (Last access date: September, 2016).

Burgess, D., & Borgida, E. (1999). Who women are, who women should be: Descriptive and prescriptive gender stereotyping in sex discrimination. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 5(3), 665-692. https://doi.org/10.1037/1076-8971.5.3.665

Burke, S., & Collins, K.M. (2001). Gender differences in leadership styles and management skills. Women in Management Review, 16(5), 244-256. https://doi.org/10.1108/09649420110395728

Carli, L.L. (2001). Gender and Social Influence. Journal of Social Issues, 57(4), 625-641. https://doi.org/10.1111/0022-4537.00238

Carli, L.L., & Eagly, A.H. (2016). Women face a labyrinth: An examination of metaphors for women leaders. Gender in Management: An International Journal, 31(8), 514-527. https://doi.org/10.1108/GM-02-2015-0007

Carrasco, R. (2001). Binary choice with binary endogenous regressors in panel data: Estimating the effect of fertility on female labor participation. Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, 19(4), 385394. https://doi.org/10.1198/07350010152596637

Catalyst Knowledge Center (2016a). Fortune 500 Board Seats Held by Women (Percent). Retrieved  from: http://www.catalyst.org/knowledge/fortune-500-board-seats-held-women. (Last access date: September, 2016).

Catalyst Knowledge Center (2016b). Fortune 500 CEO Positions Held By Women. Retrieved from: http://www.catalyst.org/knowledge/fortune-500-ceo-positions-held-women. (Last access date: September, 2016).

Center for American Women and Politics (2016). Current Numbers. Retrieved from: http://cawp.rutgers.edu/current-numbers. (Last access date: December, 2016).

Cooper, C.L., & Lewis, S. (1999). Gender and the changing nature of work. In G.N. Powell, Handbook of gender and work. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781452231365.n3

Cox, T., & Smolinski, C. (1994). Managing diversity and glass ceiling initiatives as national economic imperatives. Washington, D.C.: Glass Ceiling Commission, U.S. Department of Labor. Retrieved from: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/key_workplace/117. (Last access date: September, 2016).

Cuadrado, I. (2004). Valores y rasgos estereotípicos de género de mujeres líderes. Psicothema, 16(2), 270275.

Davia, M., & Legazpe, N. (2014). The Role of Education in Fertility and Female Employment in Spain: A Simultaneous Approach. Journal of Family Issues, 35(14), 1898-1925.   https://doi.org/10.1177/0192513X13490932

De la Rica, S., & Ferrero, M.D. (2003). The effect of fertility on labour force participation: The Spanish evidence. Spanish Economic Review, 5(2), 153-172.

De Luis Carnicer, M.P., Martínez Sánchez, A., & Pérez Pérez, M. (2003). Género y nueva economía: ¿Se romperá el “techo de cristal”?. Acciones e Investigaciones Sociales, 17, 155-182.

Dodd, F. (2012). Women leaders in the creative industries: a baseline study. International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, 4(2), 153-178. https://doi.org/10.1108/17566261211234652

Eagly, A.H. (1987). Sex differences in social behavior: A social-role interpretation. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Eagly, A.H., & Carli, L.L. (2003). The female leadership advantage: An evaluation of the evidence. The Leadership Quarterly, 14(6), 807-834. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.leaqua.2003.09.004

Eagly, A.H., & Carli, L.L. (2004). Women and men as leaders. In J. Antonakis, A.T. Cianciolo & R.J. Sternberg, The nature of leadership. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781412952392.n378

Eagly, A.H., & Carli, L.L. (2007). Through the labyrinth: The truth about how women become leaders. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.

Eagly, A.H., & Johannesen-Schmidt, M.C. (2001). The leadership styles of women and men. Journal of Social Issues, 57(4), 781-797. https://doi.org/10.1111/0022-4537.00241

Eagly, A.H., Johannesen-Schmidt, M.C. & Van Engen, M.L. (2003). Transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership styles: A meta-analysis comparing women and men. Psychological Bulletin, 129(4), 569-591. https://doi.org/10.1037/0033-2909.129.4.569

Eagly, A.H., & Johnson, B.T. (1990). Gender and leadership style: A meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 108(2), 233-256. https://doi.org/10.1037/0033-2909.108.2.233

Eagly, A.H., & Karau, S.J. (1991). Gender and the emergence of leaders: A meta-analysis. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 60(5), 685-710. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.60.5.685

Eagly, A.H., & Karau, S.J. (2002). Role congruity theory of prejudice toward female leaders. Psychological Review, 109(3), 573-598. https://doi.org/10.1037/0033-295X.109.3.573

Ehrlich, E. (1989). The mommy track: Juggling kids and careers in corporate America takes a controversial turn. Business Week, March 20, 126-134.

European Commission (2011). The Gender Balance in Business Leadership. Commission staff working paper. Retrieved from: http://ec.europa.eu/justice/gender-equality/gender-decision-making/index_en.htm. (Last access date: September, 2016).

European Commission (2012). Women in economic decision-making in the EU: Progress report. Retrieved from: http://ec.europa.eu/justice/gender-equality/document/index_en.htm. (Last access date: September, 2016).

European Commission (2013). Women and men in leadership positions in the European Union, 2013. Retrieved from: http://ec.europa.eu/justice/gender-equality/document/index_en.htm. (Last access date: September, 2016).

European Commission (2016). Database on women and men in decision-making. Retrieved from: http://ec.europa.eu/justice/gender-equality/gender-decision-making/database/index_en.htm. (Last access date: September, 2016).

Eurostat (2016). Labour Force Survey series. Retrieved from: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/data/database. (Last access date: December, 2016).

Evans, D. (2010). Aspiring to leadership … a woman’s world? An example of developments in France. Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, 17(4), 347-367. https://doi.org/10.1108/13527601011086577

Fernández Palacín, F., López Fernández, M., Maeztu Herrera, I., & Martín Prius, A. (2010). El techo de cristal en las pequeñas y medianas empresas. Revista de Estudios Empresariales, 1, 231-247.

Fletcher, J.K. (2001). Disappearing acts: Gender, power and relational practice at work. Boston: MIT Press.

Forsyth, D.R. (2010). Group dynamics. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Fridell, M., Newcom Belcher, R., & Messner, P.E. (2009). Discriminate analysis gender public school principal servant leadership differences. Leadership & Organization Development Journal, 30(8), 722-736. https://doi.org/10.1108/01437730911003894

García-Ael, C., Cuadrado, I., & Molero, F. (2012). Think-manager - Think-male vs. Teoría del Rol Social: ¿Cómo percibimos a hombres y mujeres en el mundo laboral?. Estudios de Psicología, 33(3), 347-357. https://doi.org/10.1174/021093912803758183

García-Leiva, P. (2005). Identidad de género: Modelos explicativos. Escritos de psicología, 7, 71-81.

García-Retamero, R., & López-Zafra, E. (2006). Congruencia de rol de género y liderazgo: El papel de las atribuciones causales sobre el éxito y el fracaso. Revista Latinoamericana de Psicología, 38(2), 245-257.

Gartzia, L., & Van Engen, M. (2012). Are (male) leaders “feminine” enough? Gendered traits of identity as mediators of sex differences in leadership styles. Gender in Management: An International Journal, 27(5), 292-310. https://doi.org/10.1108/17542411211252624

González Serrano, M.H., Valantine, I., Pérez Campos, C., Aguado Berenguer, S., Calabuig Moreno, F., & Crespo Hervás, J.J. (2016). La influencia del género y de la formación académica en la intención de emprender de los estudiantes de ciencias de la actividad física y el deporte. Intangible Capital, 12(3), 759-788. https://doi.org/10.3926/ic.783

Hamilton, D.L., Stroessner, S.J., & Driscoll, D.M. (1994). Social cognition and the study of stereotyping. In P.G. Devine, D.L. Hamilton & T.M. Ostrom, Social cognition: Impact on social psychology. New York: Academic Press.

Heilman, M.E. (1997). Sex discrimination and the affirmative action remedy: The role of sex stereotypes. Journal of Business Ethics, 16(9), 877-889. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1017927002761

Heilman, M.E. (2001). Description and prescription: How gender stereotypes prevent women’s ascent up the organizational ladder. Journal of Social Issues, 57(4), 657-674. https://doi.org/10.1111/0022-4537.00234

Helgesen, S. (1990). The female advantage: Women´s ways of leadership. New York: Doubleday.

Hoyt, C.L. (2010). Women, Men, and Leadership: Exploring the Gender Gap at the Top. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 4(7), 484-498. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-9004.2010.00274.x

Hoyt, C.L. (2012). Women and leadership. In P.G. Northouse, Leadership: theory and practice. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Hoyt, C.L., & Blascovich, J. (2007). Leadership efficacy and women leaders’ responses to stereotype activation. Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, 10(4), 595-616. https://doi.org/10.1177/1368430207084718

Institute of Women and Equal Opportunities (2016). Mujeres en Cifras - Poder y Toma de Decisiones - Poder Judicial, Órganos constitucionales y Organizaciones Internacionales.  Retrieved from: http://www.inmujer.gob.es/MujerCifras/PoderDecisiones/PoderTomaDecisiones.htm. (Last access date: December, 2016).

Jacobs, S. (1999). Trends in women’s career patterns and in gender occupational mobility in Britain. Gender, work and organization, 6(1), 32-46. https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-0432.00067

Junquera Cimadevilla, B. (2004). ¿Tienen menos éxito las empresas propiedad de mujeres? Una revisión de la literatura sobre la cuestión. Tribuna de Economía, 818, 245-269.

Kaufman, G., & Uhlenberg, P. (2000). The influence of parenthood on the work effort of married men and women. Social Forces, 78(3), 931-947. https://doi.org/10.2307/3005936

Keith, K., & McWilliams, A. (1999). The returns to mobility and job search by gender. Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 52(3), 460-477. https://doi.org/10.1177/001979399905200306

Kent, T.W. (2005). Leading and managing: It takes two to tango. Management Decision, 43(7/8), 10101017. https://doi.org/10.1108/00251740510610008

Kotter, J.P. (1990). A Force for Change: How Leadership Differs from Management. New York: Free Press.

Kray, L.J., Thompson, L., & Galinsky, A. (2001). Battle of the sexes: Gender stereotype confirmation and reactance in negotiations. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 80(6), 942-958. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.80.6.942

Ley Orgánica 3/2007, de 22 de marzo, para la igualdad efectiva de mujeres y hombres (BOE 23 March 2007).

Martínez Tola, E. (2009). Segregación vertical, discriminación indirecta por razón de género y cuotas de participación. III Congreso de Economía Feminista, Baeza.

Martínez Tola, E., Goñi Mendizabal, I., & Guenaga Garai, G. (2006). Beneficios de la incorporación de las mujeres en los puestos de gestión y dirección de empresas del sector privado: Una revisión bibliográfica. Defensoría para la Igualdad de Mujeres y Hombres.

Matsa, D.A., & Miller, A.R. (2013). A Female Style in Corporate Leadership? Evidence from Quotas. American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 5(3), 136-169. https://doi.org/10.1257/app.5.3.136

Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports (2016). Estadística de Estudiantes Universitarios, curso 2014-2015. Retrieved from:

http://www.mecd.gob.es/educacion-mecd/areas-educacion/universidades/estadisticas-informes/estadisticas/alumnado.html. (Last access date: September, 2016).

Minniti, M., & Nardone, C. (2007). Being in someone else’s shoes: The role of gender in nascent entrepreneurship. Small Business Economics, 28(2-3), 223-238. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11187-006-9017-y

Nielsen, S., & Huse, M. (2010). The contribution of women on boards of directors: Going beyond the surface. Corporate Governance: An International Review, 18(2), 136-148. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8683.2010.00784.x

Nieva, V.F., & Gutek, B.A. (1981). Women and work: A psychological perspective. New York: Praeger.

Northouse, P.G. (2012). Leadership: Theory and practice. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Northouse, P.G. (2014). Introduction to Leadership: Concepts and Practice. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Oakley, J.G. (2000). Gender-based Barriers to Senior Management Positions: Understanding the Scarcity of Female CEOs. Journal of Business Ethics, 27(4), 321-334. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1006226129868

Pons Peregort, O., Calvet Puig, M.D., Tura Solvas, M., & Muñoz Illescas, C. (2013). Análisis de la Igualdad de Oportunidades de Género en la Ciencia y la Tecnología: Las carreras profesionales de las mujeres científicas y tecnólogas. Intangible Capital, 9(1), 65-90.

Post, C. (2015). When is female leadership an advantage? Coordination requirements, team cohesion, andteam interaction norms. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 36(8), 1153-1175. https://doi.org/10.1002/job.2031

Post, C., & Byron, K. (2015). Women on boards and firm financial performance: A meta-analysis. Academy of Management Journal, 58(5), 1546-1571. https://doi.org/10.5465/amj.2013.0319

Powell, G.N. (1990). One more time: Do female and male managers differ?. The Executive, 4(3), 68-75. https://doi.org/10.5465/AME.1990.4274684

Powell, G.N. (2011). Women and men in management. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Powell, G.N., Butterfield, D.A., & Parent, J.D. (2002). Gender and managerial stereotypes: Have the times changed?. Journal of Management, 28(2), 177-193. https://doi.org/10.1177/014920630202800203

Powell, G.N., & Graves, L.M. (2003). Women and men in management. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Prentice, D.A., & Carranza, E. (2002). What women and men should be, shouldn’t be, are allowed to be, and don’t have to be: the contents of prescriptive gender stereotypes. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 26(4), 269-281. https://doi.org/10.1111/1471-6402.t01-1-00066

Psychogios, G.A. (2007). Towards the transformational leader: Addressing women’s leadership style in modern business management. Journal of Business and Society, 20(1/2), 169-180.

Ramos, A. (2005). Mujeres directivas: Un valor en alza para las organizaciones laborales. Cuadernos de Geografía, 78, 191-214.

Ramos, A., Barberá, E., & Sarrió, M. (2003). Mujeres directivas, espacio de poder y relaciones de género. Anuario de Psicología, 34(2), 267-278.

Ridgeway, C.L. (2001). Gender, Status, and Leadership. Journal of Social Issues, 57(4), 637-655. https://doi.org/10.1111/0022-4537.00233

Rosener, J.B. (1990). Ways Women Lead. Harvard Business Review, 68, 119-125.

Rosener, J.B. (1995). America´s competitive secret: Utilizing women as a management strategy. New York: Oxford University Press.

Rudman, L.A. (1998). Self-promotion as a risk factor for women: The costs and benefits of counter-stereotypical impression management. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 74(3), 629-645. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.74.3.629

Rudman, L.A., & Glick, P. (2001). Prescriptive gender stereotypes and backlash toward agentic women. Journal of Social Issues, 57(4), 743-762. https://doi.org/10.1111/0022-4537.00239

Rudman, L.A., Moss-Racusin, C.A., Phelan, J.E., & Nauts, S. (2012). Status incongruity and backlash effects: Defending the gender hierarchy motivates prejudice against female leaders. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48(1), 165-179. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2011.10.008

Ruizalba Robledo, J.L., Vallespín Arán, M., Martin-Sanchez, V., & Rodríguez Molina, M.A. (2015). The moderating role of gender on entrepreneurial intentions: A TPB perspective. Intangible Capital, 11(1), 92-101. https://doi.org/10.3926/ic.557

Sánchez Sellero, M.C., & Sánchez Sellero, P. (2013). El modelo de salarización en el mercado laboral gallego: Influencia del género. Intangible Capital, 9(3), 678-707. https://doi.org/10.3926/ic.422

Schein, V.E. (2001). A global look at psychological barriers to women’s progress in management. Journal of Social Issues, 57(4), 675-688. https://doi.org/10.1111/0022-4537.00235

Sekaquaptewa, D., & Thompson, M. (2003). Solo status, stereotype threat, and performance expectancies: Their effects on women’s performance. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 39(1), 68-74. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-1031(02)00508-5

Simonet, D.V., & Tett, R.P. (2012). Five Perspectives on the Leadership-Management Relationship: A Competency-Based Evaluation and Integration. Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, 20(2), 199-213. https://doi.org/10.1177/1548051812467205

Small, D.A., Gelfand, M., Babcock, L., & Gettman, H. (2007). Who goes to the bargaining table? The influence of gender and framing on the initiation of negotiation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 93(4), 600-613. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.93.4.600

Soler i Blanch, G., & Moreno Pérez, C.M. (2013). Inversión en la retribución no tangible para la conciliación laboral. Intangible Capital, 9(4), 1021-1041.

Spanish National Statistics Institute (2016a). Economically Active Population Survey. Annual Results. Retrieved from: http://www.ine.es/jaxiT3/Tabla.htm?t=4768&L=0. (Last access date: September, 2016).

Spanish National Statistics Institute (2016b). Economically Active Population Survey. Quarterly Results. Retrieved from: http://www.ine.es/jaxiT3/Tabla.htm?t=4492&L=0. (Last access date: December, 2016).

Steele, C.M., Spencer, S.J., & Aronson, J. (2002). Contending with group image: The psychology of stereotype threat and social identity threat. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 34, 379-440. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0065-2601(02)80009-0

Thoits, P.A. (1992). Identity structures and psychological well-being: Gender and marital status comparisons. Social Psychology Quarterly, 55(3), 236-256. https://doi.org/10.2307/2786794

Torres Martos, M.J., & Román Onsalo, M. (2012). Impacto de la ley de igualdad en el contenido de la negociación colectiva del sector andaluz de la construcción. Intangible Capital, 8(2), 447-471.

Trinidad, C., & Normore, A.H. (2005). Leadership and gender: a dangerous liaison?. Leadership & Organization Development Journal, 26(7), 574-590. https://doi.org/10.1108/01437730510624601

Tuuk, E. (2012). Transformational leadership in the coming decade: A response to three major workplace trends. Cornell HR Review, May 5, 1-6.

U.S. Department of Labor (1991). A Report on the Glass Ceiling Initiative. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Labor.

U.S. Glass Ceiling Commission (1995). Good for Business: Making Full Use of the Nation’s HumanCapital. Retrieved from: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/key_workplace/116/. (Last access date: September, 2016).

Van Engen, M.L., & Willemsen, T.M. (2004). Sex and leadership styles: A meta-analysis of research published in the 1990s. Psychological Reports, 94(1), 3-18. https://doi.org/10.2466/pr0.94.1.3-18

Vecchio, R.P (2002). Leadership and gender advantage. The Leadership Quarterly, 13, 643-671. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1048-9843(02)00156-X

Ventura Fernández, R., & Quero Gervilla, M.J. (2013). Factores explicativos de la intención de emprender en la mujer. Aspectos diferenciales en la población universitaria según la variable género. Cuadernos de Gestión, 13(1), 127-149. https://doi.org/10.5295/cdg.100271rv

Wadman, M.K. (1992). Mothers who take extended time off find their careers pay a heavy price. Wall Street Journal, July 16.

Wirth, L. (2001). Breaking through the glass ceiling: Women in management. Geneva: International Labour Office.

Wittenberg-Cox, A., & Maitland, A. (2009). Why women mean business: Understanding the emergence of our next economic revolution. Chichester: Wiley.

Yukl, G., & Lepsinger, R. (2005). Why integrating the leading and managing roles is essential for organizational effectiveness. Organizational Dynamics, 34(4), 361-375. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.orgdyn.2005.08.004

 






Versión en español

tulo: Mujer y liderazgo: Barreras de género en el acceso a la alta dirección

Resumen

Objeto: El objetivo de esta investigación es reflejar la representación femenina actual en los puestos de liderazgo empresarial. Además, pretende identificar los principales factores que determinan una menor presencia de mujeres en la alta dirección así como las políticas para alcanzar el equilibrio de género en los ámbitos de decisión.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque: Con el fin de mostrar la participación femenina en los puestos de nivel superior se ha analizado la información contenida en la base de datos Women and men in decision-making de la Comisión Europea. Esta base de datos recoge información sobre la presencia de mujeres en órganos de poder de las principales empresas europeas que cotizan en bolsa. El análisis se ha completado con datos de la Encuesta de Población Activa del Instituto Nacional de Estadística y con datos del censo de empresas de la lista Fortune 500 elaborado por Catalyst. Posteriormente, se ha realizado una revisión bibliográfica en profundidad orientada a plantear los factores que pueden explicar la situación actual de las mujeres en los ámbitos de decisión y las estrategias que promuevan una mayor presencia femenina en la alta dirección. La revisión de la literatura la hemos realizado mediante la búsqueda en Google Académico y en las bases de datos ABI/INFORM Global, Emerald e International Bibliography of the Social Sciences que posibilita el análisis de diversas revistas.

Aportaciones y resultados: Este trabajo pone de relieve la situación de desequilibrio de género en los espacios de decisión empresarial. La mayor parte de las barreras para acceder a la alta dirección están relacionadas con los estereotipos de género. Por lo tanto, se plantea la necesidad de combinar medidas orientadas a proporcionar el apoyo necesario a las mujeres en el acceso a cargos directivos con otras a largo plazo que impulsen un proceso de análisis y aprendizaje en toda la sociedad.

Originalidad / Valor añadido: La investigación permite valorar la magnitud del desequilibrio de género todavía presente en los puestos de liderazgo. También plantea la necesidad de desarrollar medidas tanto a corto plazo como a largo plazo.

Palabras clave: Liderazgo, Equilibrio de género, Alta dirección, Desarrollo profesional

Códigos JEL: J24, J71, M12

 

1. Introducción

Tanto las diferencias de género como el liderazgo son temas sobre los que existe abundante literatura. Sin embargo, el análisis conjunto de ambos fenómenos no ha sido tan frecuente. Puede decirse que los estudios e investigaciones científicas serias, en relación a este tema, se desarrollan a comienzos de 1970. En el presente trabajo pretendemos analizar la asociación de estos dos fenómenos, centrando nuestro interés en el “liderazgo femenino”, tanto en si existe un estilo especial de liderar femenino, como en las posibles barreras que las mujeres deben sortear para alcanzar puestos de máxima responsabilidad en las organizaciones.

Resulta curioso observar cómo en cualquier auditorio, si se pregunta tanto a mujeres como a hombres el nombre de un líder, en general, la mayoría de las personas contestan el nombre de un líder varón. Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela, Winston Churchill o Barack Obama, entre otros, son nombres que se asocian con la palabra liderazgo y todos ellos son masculinos. Aunque a lo largo de la historia algunas mujeres como Juana de Arco, Marie Curie, Simone de Beauvoir o Teresa de Calcuta se han convertido en personas y lideres importantes, en general, las mujeres han carecido de libertad suficiente para poder desarrollar sus creencias e ideas. Esa falta de libertad ha obstaculizado la aparición de mujeres con las mismas cualidades y potencial que muchos hombres líderes. El “poder” pertenecía a los hombres y teniendo poder y libertad éstos lo aprovechaban para llevar a cabo sus ideas y pensamientos, tanto política como económicamente.

El liderazgo es un concepto estrechamente relacionado con la gestión o dirección de las organizaciones. De acuerdo con Northouse (2012) tanto el liderazgo como la dirección implican trabajar con personas y están relacionados con la influencia sobre grupos de individuos y con la consecución de objetivos. Sin embargo, diversos autores coinciden en mencionar la importancia de distinguir entre ambas ideas (Kent, 2005; Kotter, 1990; Northouse, 2014; Simonet & Tett, 2012; Yukl & Lepsinger, 2005). En general, mientras la gestión y la dirección se relacionan con la disciplina, el orden y la estabilidad, el liderazgo se asocia con el pensamiento creativo, la tolerancia a la ambigüedad y el impulso de cambios constructivos. En este trabajo, nos centraremos en el estudio de la participación femenina en los puestos directivos de las organizaciones, en los que se requiere una gran capacidad de liderazgo, y emplearemos ambos términos de forma prácticamente equivalente sin insistir en las diferencias que presentan.

En la actualidad, es un hecho que las mujeres aparecen escasamente representadas en puestos de alta dirección de empresas privadas y de organismos públicos del mundo occidental, aunque también se puede afirmar que en los niveles intermedios de la escala laboral y en puestos de responsabilidad media existe un mayor equilibrio entre hombres y mujeres. En este trabajo, siguiendo los planteamientos de Hoyt (2012), intentaremos identificar los factores que pueden influir en la escasa presencia femenina en los niveles directivos más altos. Mediante una profunda revisión bibliográfica trataremos de explicar algunas razones que pueden determinar esta situación.

En el transcurso de la historia una argumentación que se ha planteado para explicar la escasa presencia de mujeres líderes es que los objetivos o fines del estilo de vida masculino y femenino han sido distintos. De acuerdo con esta idea, los varones han orientado, en general, su forma de liderar centrándose en la tarea, mientras que las mujeres lo han hecho centrándose en las personas o en la relación. El liderazgo masculino, centrado en la tarea, ha sido más visible, más formal y oficial y el liderazgo femenino, centrado en las personas, en cambio, ha sido considerado un liderazgo de apoyo. Sin embargo, resulta fundamental analizar si las mujeres tienden universalmente a “centrarse en la relación” en su estilo de liderar y si los varones tienden a “centrarse en la tarea” (Eagly & Johnson 1990; Hoyt, 2010).

En este sentido, diversas investigaciones sostienen que existen diferencias de género en los estilos de liderazgo y que el liderazgo de la mujer es más efectivo en la sociedad contemporánea (Book, 2000; Helgesen, 1990; Rosener, 1995; Vecchio, 2002). Algunos estudios afirman que las mujeres dirigen y lideran con formas más democráticas y participativas que los varones (Eagly & Carli, 2007; Van Engen & Willemsen, 2004). Igualmente, varios autores han planteado la idea de que las mujeres utilizan de manera más frecuente y efectiva que los líderes varones el estilo de liderazgo transformacional (Ayman, Korabik & Morris, 2009; Eagly, Johannesen-Schmidt & Van Engen., 2003).

En el ámbito del emprendimiento, también se han desarrollado investigaciones que estudian la influencia de la variable género sobre la actividad emprendedora (Brush, 1992; González Serrano, Valantine, Pérez Campos, Aguado Berenguer, Calabuig Moreno & Crespo Hervás, 2016; Minniti & Nardone, 2007; Ruizalba Robledo, Vallespín Arán, Martin-Sanchez & Rodríguez Molina, 2015; Ventura Fernández & Quero Gervilla, 2013). Estos trabajos reflejan igualmente la existencia de diferencias en los patrones de comportamiento de emprendimiento en función del género.

En este primer punto introductorio queremos proponer algunos importantes interrogantes que surgen al analizar el liderazgo femenino y que deberían encontrar respuesta o explicación en nuestro mundo occidental. En concreto, nos preguntamos si es posible universalizar la idea de que las mujeres poseen una manera de liderar distinta o diferenciada de los varones y si puede hablarse, por lo tanto, de un estilo masculino de liderar y un estilo femenino de liderar. A lo largo del trabajo trataremos de dar respuesta y reflexionar en torno a dichas cuestiones.

Los objetivos de esta investigación, por lo tanto, son los siguientes:

  • Reflejar la evolución de la representación femenina en los altos puestos directivos de las organizaciones.

  • Plantear las barreras que deben superar las mujeres en el acceso a la alta dirección así como la relevancia de un posible estilo de liderazgo femenino.

  • Sugerir posibles cambios y políticas orientadas a aumentar la presencia femenina en los puestos directivos de las organizaciones.

El trabajo está dividido en seis apartados. En el siguiente apartado describimos la situación actual de las mujeres en la alta dirección de las organizaciones del mundo occidental. Posteriormente, mencionamos algunos factores que pueden estar condicionando dicha situación. En el cuarto apartado, presentamos algunas medidas que podrían favorecer el equilibrio de género en los distintos ámbitos de decisión. También dedicamos un apartado al debate originado por las cuotas de género en los órganos de poder. El último apartado recoge las principales conclusiones del trabajo.

 

2. Evolución de la representación femenina en los altos cargos directivos

La presencia de mujeres, tanto en el campo educativo como en ámbito laboral, ha registrado un cambio sustancial en las últimas décadas. Actualmente, la mayoría de las mujeres no encuentran obstáculos en el acceso a una educación superior y el incremento en su nivel de estudios ha sido notable en los últimos años. No obstante, es preciso matizar que las preferencias de hombres y mujeres todavía difieren a la hora de elegir los estudios superiores.

Como indican Pons Peregort, Calvet Puig, Tura Solvas y Muñoz Illescas (2013), aunque la presencia de mujeres en la universidad es superior a la de los hombres, en algunos estudios del ámbito científico y tecnológico el porcentaje de hombres sigue siendo superior al de mujeres. Igualmente, en la Estadística de Estudiantes Universitarios del Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte para el curso académico 2014-2015 se puede comprobar que para el conjunto de los estudios de grado el porcentaje de mujeres es superior al de hombres y que, sin embargo, dicha tendencia se invierte en el caso de las ingenierías y de los estudios de ciencias. En este sentido, en el mundo de la dirección empresarial, es habitual encontrar empresarios que han completado sus estudios técnicos, mientras que la educación de las empresarias suele ser más económica, administrativa o comercial (Junquera Cimadevilla, 2004).

La presencia de las mujeres no se ha incrementado solamente en el campo de la educación, también ha aumentado su participación en la fuerza laboral, tanto en puestos inferiores como en puestos de responsabilidad media, pero sigue existiendo poca representación femenina en los puestos más elevados. El estudio realizado por Martínez Tola, Goñi Mendizabal y Guenaga Garai (2006) pone de manifiesto la escasa presencia de las mujeres en los puestos de liderazgo y refleja las diferencias existentes entre distintos países. En los siguientes párrafos trataremos de actualizar dicha información y comprobar en qué medida el “gap de género” o la brecha que separa a hombres y mujeres en cuanto a oportunidades y acceso a puestos directivos se mantiene en la actualidad. Nos centraremos en algunos datos recogidos para Europa y Estados Unidos.

 

2.1. Europa

La Comisión Europea elabora una base de datos que recoge información acerca de la participación de las mujeres en los espacios de decisión de distintos ámbitos como la política o la economía. El objetivo es proporcionar estadísticas fiables acerca de la evolución y de la situación actual de las mujeres en distintos contextos. En la sección empresarial de la base de datos se proporciona información acerca del equilibrio de género en los ámbitos de decisión de las grandes compañías de distintos países. Las empresas consideradas son las mayores empresas que cotizan en bolsa de cada país. La siguiente figura refleja la presencia de mujeres en los altos cargos de las compañías más importantes de algunos países europeos para el año 2016.

 

 

Figura 1. Mujeres en puestos de dirección de las principales empresas de países europeos, 2006-2016 (European Commission, 2016)

 

Los datos presentados para los distintos países muestran que en la última década se ha producido una mejora sustancial en la presencia femenina en los altos cargos de muchos países europeos. No obstante, en la mayoría de los países las mujeres aún no representan ni un tercio de los altos cargos de gestión. También cabe destacar que las cifras varían considerablemente en función del país. En los países nórdicos, en general, la situación de las mujeres en los cargos de decisión es mejor que en el resto de países europeos. Noruega destaca especialmente con un 41% de mujeres en altos cargos directivos y puede considerarse que estaría en una zona de equilibrio de género razonable en los ámbitos de decisión de las grandes compañías. Igualmente, nos parece importante señalar el impulso hacia un mayor equilibrio de género en algunos países como Francia e Italia.

El informe realizado por la Comisión Europea sobre la participación de mujeres y hombres en cargos de liderazgo (European Commission, 2013) reconoce la importancia de las iniciativas tanto políticas como legislativas para impulsar el cambio hacia un equilibrio de género. De acuerdo con este informe, los avances más importantes en cuanto a la presencia femenina en los puestos de liderazgo empresarial se han producido en los países en los que se ha adoptado legislación vinculante al respecto como Francia, Holanda o Italia. En la misma línea, el informe elaborado por la Comisión Europea sobre la situación de las mujeres en los espacios de decisión económicos (European Commission, 2012) hace referencia a los cambios legislativos adoptados en Francia y a la evolución positiva de este país.

En general, las cifras sobre representación femenina en los cargos directivos de las grandes compañías europeas reflejan que las medidas adoptadas en los distintos países han tenido resultados positivos. Sin embargo, aunque el avance ha sido considerable, el porcentaje medio de mujeres directivas en las empresas más importantes de la Unión Europea todavía está alejado de una situación de equilibrio de género. Igualmente, de acuerdo con la encuesta de población activa elaborada por Eurostat, en el año 2015, del total de personas de la Unión Europea en ocupaciones directivas, las mujeres representaban un 33%, cifra que ha permanecido prácticamente constante desde el año 2006 (Eurostat, 2016).

En la base de datos mencionada, sobre participación de las mujeres en distintos ámbitos de decisión, la Comisión Europea también ofrece información acerca de la presencia de mujeres en los cargos de máxima responsabilidad de una organización. En el año 2016 solamente el 5% de los cargos de director ejecutivo o consejero delegado de las grandes compañías de la Unión Europea estaban ocupados por mujeres. En el documento de trabajo sobre equilibrio de género en el liderazgo empresarial elaborado por la Comisión Europea (European Commission, 2011) se pone de manifiesto la importancia de aumentar la presencia de las mujeres en estos cargos para fortalecer así la cadena de liderazgo y facilitar el acceso de otras mujeres a puestos de alta dirección. En dicho informe se menciona igualmente la necesidad de desarrollar un enfoque de abajo hacia arriba que asegure que las mujeres tienen las mismas oportunidades que los hombres en todas las etapas del proceso de promoción ejecutiva.

En los ámbitos de decisión de la política, la participación de las mujeres también es inferior a la de los hombres. La representación femenina en los parlamentos de los países de la Unión Europea es de un 28% y el porcentaje de mujeres en los gobiernos de dichos países de un 27% (European Commission, 2016). La base de datos de la Comisión Europea sobre participación femenina en los espacios de decisión también hace referencia al equilibrio de género en el poder judicial así como en los puestos de funcionarios de alto nivel. De acuerdo con la citada base de datos las mujeres representan un 40% de los miembros en los órganos judiciales supremos de los países de la Unión Europea. En los ministerios o departamentos gubernamentales el 34% de los puestos de funcionarios de más alto nivel y el 40% de los puestos de funcionarios del segundo nivel más alto los ocupan mujeres.

 

2.2. España

En el caso de España aunque puede apreciarse un importante avance en la última década en cuanto a la presencia de mujeres en puestos de liderazgo empresarial la situación actual todavía está alejada de una situación de equilibrio de género. En la siguiente figura presentamos la evolución de la presencia femenina en altos cargos directivos de las mayores empresas españolas durante los últimos diez años. Como mayores empresas se han tomado aquellas incluidas en el índice IBEX 35.

 

 

Figura 2. Mujeres en puestos de dirección de las principales empresas españolas, 2006-2016 (European Commission, 2016)

 

Los datos reflejan un aumento de la representación femenina en los puestos directivos de las grandes compañías españolas durante la última década. No obstante, este avance se ha producido de forma relativamente lenta y la presencia de mujeres en los puestos de liderazgo empresarial en España se sitúa todavía por debajo de la media europea. Esta situación no se ajusta al objetivo planteado por la legislación para la igualdad entre mujeres y hombres aprobada en 2007 (Ley Orgánica 3/2007) que sugería a las empresas españolas incrementar la representación femenina en los consejos de administración para poder alcanzar una presencia equilibrada de mujeres y hombres en un plazo de ocho años. En este sentido, aunque en el ámbito de la negociación colectiva, las autoras Torres Martos y Román Onsalo (2012) también expresan el insuficiente impacto de la normativa para la igualdad entre mujeres y hombres.

Por otro lado, si consideramos la población total ocupada en España, la representación de las mujeres en puestos de directores y gerentes es superior a la observada para los altos cargos en las grandes compañías. La siguiente tabla refleja la evolución de la participación de las mujeres en el mercado laboral español durante los últimos cinco años así como el porcentaje de mujeres en la categoría de directores y gerentes.

 

 

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

TOTAL OCUPADOS

45.37%

45.56%

45.65%

45.51%

44.89%

DIRECTORES Y GERENTES

31.37%

30.88%

30.76%

30.21%

29.95%

Miembros del poder ejecutivo y de los cuerpos legislativos; directivos de la Administración Pública y organizaciones de interés social; directores ejecutivos

32.26%

29.05%

25.94%

29.13%

28.83%

Directores de departamentos administrativos y comerciales

36.73%

32.19%

33.64%

33.67%

33.65%

Directores de producción y operaciones

25.75%

27.35%

26.82%

25.04%

23.58%

Directores y gerentes de empresas de alojamiento, restauración y comercio

34.11%

32.44%

32.69%

31.06%

31.87%

Directores y gerentes de otras empresas de servicios no clasificados bajo otros epígrafes

30.95%

35.61%

34.16%

35.93%

37.24%

Tabla 1. Presencia de mujeres en la población ocupada y en la categoría de Directores y Gerentes, 2011-2015 (Spanish National Statistics Institute, 2016a)

 

En términos cuantitativos se puede decir que prácticamente no existen diferencias entre hombres y mujeres en cuanto a la participación en el mercado laboral, con más de un 45% de mujeres entre la población ocupada española. Este elevado porcentaje no se ve reflejado, en cambio, en los puestos de dirección en los que las mujeres representan algo más de un tercio. Aunque es cierto que la presencia femenina en esta categoría es superior que la observada para los puestos de alta dirección en las grandes empresas españolas, se puede apreciar que tampoco se ajusta a los datos sobre participación de las mujeres en el mercado laboral.

Los trabajos desarrollados por Martínez Tola et al. (2006) y Martínez Tola (2009) reflejan que la presencia de mujeres en puestos directivos aumenta a medida que disminuye el tamaño de la empresa y hacen especial referencia a la presencia de mujeres directivas en las empresas sin personal asalariado. Del mismo modo, Junquera Cimadevilla (2004) menciona un menor porcentaje de mujeres empresarias en las empresas con personal asalariado. De acuerdo con estas autoras, las diferencias de género en puestos de liderazgo son más notables conforme aumenta el tamaño de las empresas y por lo tanto el tamaño empresarial es una variable fundamental a la hora de analizar la presencia de mujeres en cargos directivos.

Respecto al ámbito político, de acuerdo con la información que recoge la base de datos de la Comisión Europea sobre participación femenina en los espacios de decisión, actualmente el porcentaje de mujeres en el parlamento español es de un 39% y el porcentaje de mujeres en el gobierno de un 25%. En la esfera del poder judicial, aunque la representación femenina en el Tribunal Supremo es de un 13%, el 52% de los miembros de la carrera judicial y el 43% de los miembros del Consejo General del Poder Judicial son mujeres (Institute of Women and Equal Opportunities, 2016). Además, en los puestos de funcionarios de más alto nivel de la Administración General del Estado las mujeres representan un 35% (European Commission, 2016). Igualmente, el porcentaje de mujeres directivas y gerentes en el sector público es de un 41% frente a un 30% en el sector privado (Spanish National Statistics Institute, 2016b).

Por lo tanto, en el ámbito de la política y de las administraciones públicas, en comparación con el de las grandes empresas españolas, se aprecia en general una representación más equilibrada de hombres y mujeres en los puestos de liderazgo. Esto puede vincularse con la normativa sobre cuotas electorales y con el hecho de que la carrera profesional y el acceso a determinados cargos en la administración pública están regulados mediante el desarrollo de pruebas objetivas (Ramos, 2005).

 

2.3. Estados Unidos

La situación es similar en otros países del mundo occidental como Estados Unidos donde las mujeres representan el 16.9% de los puestos directivos de las mayores empresas del país y el 4% de los cargos de máxima responsabilidad en dichas empresas (Catalyst Knowledge Center, 2016a, 2016b).

En el caso de Estados Unidos la organización sin ánimo de lucro Catalyst realiza un censo anual con el fin de reflejar la representación de las mujeres en puestos de alta dirección de las principales empresas del país. La población de dicho censo la componen las compañías incluidas en la lista Fortune 500 ya que además de ser las empresas más grandes por nivel de ingresos en Estados Unidos son ampliamente reconocidas como las empresas más poderosas e influyentes. Aunque la información recogida en el citado censo no es completamente comparable con la presentada anteriormente para los países europeos, ofrece una idea sobre la situación de las mujeres en los puestos de liderazgo empresarial en Estados Unidos. En la siguiente figura se presentan datos sobre participación femenina en los puestos de dirección de las principales empresas estadounidenses durante los últimos diez años.

 

Figura 3. Mujeres en puestos de dirección de las principales empresas estadounidenses, 2003-2013 (Catalyst Knowledge Center, 2016a)

 

De acuerdo con los datos presentados, se puede decir que el avance en cuanto a la presencia de mujeres directivas en las grandes empresas estadounidenses se produce a un ritmo muy lento. La participación de las mujeres en cargos directivos en las más importantes compañías de Estados Unidos durante el año 2013 fue de un 16.9% sin apenas mejora respecto al año anterior en el que el porcentaje de mujeres en altos cargos fue de un 16.6%.

Igual que ocurría en el caso de España, las cifras de representación femenina en la alta dirección de las empresas más importantes de Estados Unidos no se corresponden con los datos sobre participación femenina en el mercado laboral, ni tampoco con el porcentaje de mujeres en la categoría de directivos. Las estadísticas del mercado laboral estadounidense reflejan que durante el año 2015 las mujeres representaban un 46.8% de la población total ocupada y que el porcentaje de mujeres en la categoría de directivos y profesionales era de un 51.5% (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2016).

En los altos cargos de la política estadounidense la representación de las mujeres también es inferior que la de los hombres. Durante el año 2016 las mujeres ocuparon el 19.6% de los escaños en el Congreso de los Estados Unidos y el 30.4% de los cargos en el gobierno federal y a nivel estatal las mujeres representaban el 24.4% de los miembros del poder legislativo y el 24% de los cargos ejecutivos del conjunto de estados (Center for American Women and Politics, 2016).

En Estados Unidos, igual que en la Unión Europea, la representación femenina es superior en los puestos de liderazgo del ámbito político que en los altos cargos del ámbito económico. No obstante, en comparación con España y otros países de la Unión Europea, el incremento de la participación femenina en los puestos directivos de las grandes compañías de Estados Unidos se ha producido de una forma muy lenta. Durante los últimos años, el aumento de mujeres directivas en las principales empresas estadounidenses ha sido moderado, mientras que el porcentaje de mujeres en la alta dirección de las compañías más importantes de la Unión Europea se ha duplicado. En este sentido, cabe destacar el nivel de compromiso que han mostrado algunos países de la Unión Europea para lograr un mayor equilibrio de género en los espacios de decisión así como la efectividad de las medidas adoptadas.

 

3. Barreras de género en la alta dirección

Los datos presentados ponen de manifiesto una escasa presencia de mujeres en los puestos directivos de las principales empresas europeas y estadounidenses. La participación femenina en los altos cargos de las grandes empresas está muy por debajo de la participación masculina y se puede decir que en el ámbito empresarial aún queda un largo camino que recorrer para alcanzar el equilibrio de género. En el presente apartado realizamos una revisión bibliográfica y planteamos algunos factores que pueden estar condicionando esta situación de desequilibrio de género en las más altas esferas de la gestión y dirección de empresas.

La revisión de la literatura la realizamos principalmente mediante la búsqueda en Google Académico y en las bases de datos ABI/INFORM Global, Emerald e International Bibliography of the Social Sciences que posibilita la exploración de diversas revistas. En la búsqueda empleamos términos como leadership, management, leadership theory, leadership styles, transformational leadership, women, gender, female, discrimination, gender gap y glass ceiling, tanto en el idioma inglés como en castellano. Entre las distintas investigaciones obtenidas seleccionamos las que contribuyen en mayor medida a alcanzar los objetivos planteados en este trabajo. En este sentido, analizamos estudios relacionados con los estilos de liderazgo de hombres y mujeres, con los estereotipos de género o con los obstáculos que afrontan las mujeres para alcanzar puestos de liderazgo. Completamos la recopilación mediante la revisión de la bibliografía incluida en los estudios seleccionados.

Una de las expresiones más empleadas para explicar las causas de la baja representación femenina en puestos directivos es la metáfora del techo de cristal. Este término fue popularizado en 1986 con un artículo publicado en Wall Street Journal sobre mujeres ejecutivas (U.S. Glass Ceiling Commission, 1995). De acuerdo con este concepto las mujeres se enfrentan a un conjunto de barreras invisibles e impenetrables en la medida que se acercan a los altos cargos de la jerarquía empresarial.

En 1991 el Departamento de Trabajo de Estados Unidos definía el techo de cristal como un conjunto de obstáculos artificiales basados en la arbitrariedad que impiden que individuos cualificados asciendan en su organización a los puestos de gestión (U.S. Department of Labor, 1991). El informe desarrollado en 1995 por la Comisión encargada de identificar dichos obstáculos mencionaba tres niveles de barreras: las barreras sociales, como los prejuicios o estereotipos de género, las barreras de la organización, como las relacionadas con los procesos de selección o la cultura empresarial y las barreras gubernamentales, como una falta de seguimiento firme en el cumplimiento de la ley (U.S. Glass Ceiling Commission, 1995). El citado informe subraya que estas barreras contradicen una de las creencias más importantes de la nación estadounidense, la que hace referencia a que la educación, la dedicación y el trabajo duro dan lugar a una vida mejor. En términos de competitividad empresarial, también reconoce que la diversidad en la alta dirección y la eliminación del techo de cristal beneficiarían a las empresas.

Aunque la metáfora del techo de cristal permite enunciar de forma clara el problema de desequilibrio de género en los altos cargos de las organizaciones, consideramos que puede tener algunas limitaciones. Este concepto parte de la hipótesis de que tanto mujeres como hombres tienen las mismas posibilidades de acceso a determinadas posiciones hasta que las mujeres encuentran una barrera invisible difícil de sobrepasar y que los hombres no encuentran a lo largo de su camino profesional. Actualmente, aunque algunas mujeres acceden a puestos de alta responsabilidad en las organizaciones, el recorrido que deben realizar para alcanzar dichos puestos es complejo e implica la superación de multitud de dificultades. La idea del techo de cristal plantea una única barrera homogénea en los niveles profesionales más altos e ignora la complejidad y diversidad de los obstáculos que deben afrontar las mujeres que ocupan altos cargos (Carli & Eagly, 2016; Eagly & Carli, 2007). La metáfora del laberinto del liderazgo, en cambio, muestra que el acceso a puestos de liderazgo, sobre todo para las mujeres, supone una sucesión de obstáculos que forman parte de un proceso y que son la causa de la poca representación femenina en altos cargos empresariales y organizativos.

Hoyt (2012) hace referencia al laberinto del liderazgo y plantea una clasificación de los distintos tipos de barreras que dificultan el acceso de las mujeres a los puestos de nivel superior. De acuerdo con esta autora, los factores que explican una menor representación femenina en los altos cargos pueden clasificarse en tres grandes grupos: los relacionados con el capital humano, los que tienen que ver con las diferencias de género y los vinculados con los prejuicios. Esta clasificación permite presentar de una forma estructurada el conjunto de obstáculos a los que deben enfrentarse las mujeres que acceden a la alta dirección. Teniendo en cuenta dicha agrupación, en los siguientes párrafos, trataremos de plantear las razones o barreras que pueden explicar una menor presencia de mujeres en los puestos de liderazgo.

 

3.1. Capital Humano

El eje central de la teoría del capital humano es que los individuos mediante la inversión en sí mismos consiguen incrementar sus capacidades productivas. Las principales fuentes de inversión en capital humano son la educación, la formación y la experiencia laboral. De acuerdo con esta teoría, uno de los factores que dificultan la promoción profesional de las mujeres es su menor inversión en capital humano (Barberá Heredia, Ramos, Sarrió & Candela, 2002; Jacobs, 1999). Este planteamiento sugiere que muchas mujeres al no disponer de tiempo fuera de su horario laboral para invertirlo en su formación quedan excluidas de la promoción profesional. Del mismo modo, habitualmente son las mujeres las que interrumpen sus carreras profesionales o trabajan a tiempo parcial para el cuidado de la familia, por lo que tienen menos años de experiencia laboral y más interrupciones que desaceleran su progreso profesional (Eagly & Carli, 2004; 2007; Hoyt, 2010; Keith & McWilliams, 1999; Pons Peregort et al., 2013).

Diversos estudios señalan que existe una relación negativa entre las decisiones de fecundidad y la participación femenina en el mercado laboral (Alonso Antón, Fernández Sainz & Rincón Diez, 2015; Álvarez-Llorente, 2002; Álvarez Llorente & Otero Giráldez, 2006; Ariza & Ugidos, 2007; Carrasco, 2001; Davia & Legazpe, 2014; De la Rica & Ferrero, 2003). La investigación realizada por Kaufman y Uhlenberg (2000) pone de manifiesto la influencia de los roles tradicionales de género sobre la participación de hombres y mujeres en el mercado de trabajo. De acuerdo con este estudio, las mujeres con hijos muestran una menor propensión a participar en el mercado laboral que las mujeres sin hijos y las que participan lo hacen durante menos horas. Los hombres con hijos, por el contrario, muestran una mayor tendencia a participar en el mercado laboral y a trabajar más horas que los hombres sin hijos. En la misma línea, Sánchez Sellero y Sánchez Sellero (2013) afirman que al aumentar el tamaño familiar la probabilidad de trabajar por cuenta ajena disminuye en el caso de las mujeres, mientras que esta probabilidad se mantiene invariable en el caso de los hombres.

En un análisis sobre el reparto de responsabilidades domésticas y del cuidado de los hijos Biernat y Wortman (1991) estudian la presencia de los roles tradicionales de género en algunas esferas de la vida de las mujeres profesionales. De acuerdo con estas autoras, a pesar de la tradicional desigualdad en el reparto de las tareas, las mujeres presentan una actitud más autocrítica que los hombres.

En muchas ocasiones, las mujeres ante la dificultad de combinar la vida laboral y la personal deciden reducir sus compromisos profesionales e interrumpen su carrera profesional o eligen trabajos a tiempo parcial (Bowles & McGinn, 2005). Sin embargo, las mujeres que deciden reincorporarse, a menudo, encuentran dificultades para volver a su puesto y a veces entran en un puesto inferior al que tenían, lo que dificulta en gran medida su promoción profesional (Belkin, 2003; Ehrlich, 1989; Nieva & Gutek, 1981; Wadman, 1992).

Soler i Blanch y Moreno Pérez (2013) plantean que las empresas que implementan medidas orientadas a potenciar el equilibrio entre el tiempo personal y profesional obtienen resultados positivos tanto para los trabajadores como para la organización. Este tipo de medidas posibilitan tanto a hombres como a mujeres compatibilizar la vida laboral con otras actividades de la vida personal como el cuidado de los hijos o la realización de tareas domésticas.

Por otro lado, las mujeres, posiblemente debido a los prejuicios sobre su experiencia en situaciones laborales, suelen tener menos oportunidades de desarrollo que los hombres y menos estímulos a nivel organizacional, cuya importancia también es fundamental en términos de autopromoción (Fernández Palacín, López Fernández, Maeztu Herrera & Martín Prius, 2010; Hoyt, 2010; Powell & Graves, 2003; Ramos, Barberá & Sarrió, 2003).

Respecto a la inversión en educación, se puede decir que la situación está equilibrada en todos los niveles educativos y en el caso de la educación superior, más relacionada con los altos cargos de decisión, en muchos países, las mujeres aventajan a los hombres (Barberá Ribera, Estellés Miguel & Dema Pérez, 2009). Actualmente, en España, en términos cuantitativos no se aprecian diferencias en el nivel educativo de hombres y mujeres, sin embargo, la proporción de mujeres en los altos cargos de gestión sigue siendo menor (European Commission, 2016; Spanish National Statistics Institute, 2016a; Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports, 2016).

Teniendo en cuenta todo lo anterior, se puede afirmar que las diferencias en los comportamientos laborales tienen su origen en el mantenimiento de los roles y funciones estereotipadas de género (Barberá Heredia et al., 2002). El enfoque tradicional de la división del trabajo según el cual la responsabilidad del cuidado de la familia recae sobre las mujeres supone una barrera importante en su progreso profesional. Estos roles de género, presentes en la cultura empresarial de muchas compañías, establecen que las mujeres deberían asumir la responsabilidad principal de cuidar a la familia y plantean dudas, especialmente en la alta dirección, acerca de la posibilidad de desarrollar ese papel junto con el de una carrera profesional. En consecuencia, las mujeres obtienen menos ofertas para los puestos directivos y reciben una menor preparación para dichos puestos (De Luis Carnicer, Martínez Sánchez & Pérez Pérez, 2003; European Commission, 2011).

 

3.2. Diferencias de género

El enfoque basado en las diferencias de género plantea que las mujeres y los hombres tienen diferentes rasgos relacionados con el liderazgo que pueden explicar una menor presencia de las mujeres en los altos cargos de decisión. De acuerdo con esta idea las mujeres no están representadas en los altos cargos debido a las diferencias en los estilos de liderazgo de hombres y mujeres. En general, los rasgos asociados a los hombres han sido mejor valorados para los puestos de liderazgo. Sin embargo, diversos autores señalan que el liderazgo efectivo requiere de una combinación de características asociadas tanto a hombres como a mujeres, como la inteligencia emocional, la asunción de riesgos, la empatía, la integridad o la capacidad de persuadir, motivar e inspirar a los demás, entre otras (Eagly & Carli, 2003; 2007; Fernández Palacín et al., 2010; Hoyt, 2010; Powell, 1990; Vecchio, 2002).

Teniendo en cuenta las diferencias de género en el reparto de responsabilidades domésticas, también se ha planteado una menor motivación hacia los puestos de liderazgo por parte de las mujeres para explicar su escasa presencia en los altos cargos. Sin embargo, varios autores afirman que las mujeres y los hombres presentan el mismo nivel de compromiso hacia sus empleos y muestran la misma motivación hacia las posiciones de liderazgo (Bielby & Bielby, 1988; Eagly & Carli, 2007; Hoyt, 2010; Thoits, 1992).

De acuerdo con Bowles y McGinn (2005) las principales diferencias de género en relación con el liderazgo se producen en la demanda que hacen hombres y mujeres en puestos de dirección. En general, los hombres reclaman y mantienen un mayor número de puestos de liderazgo que las mujeres. Las mujeres muestran una menor propensión a iniciar negociaciones para alcanzar los puestos y oportunidades deseados y generalmente se encuentran con mayores costes sociales que los hombres cuando lo hacen (Babcock & Laschever, 2003; Bowles, Babcock & Lai, 2007; Small, Gelfand, Babcock & Gettman, 2007).

En los procesos de selección y promoción de recursos humanos los hombres obtienen mejores valoraciones que las mujeres para puestos directivos, ya que por regla general el liderazgo se vincula con rasgos asociados a la masculinidad (Fernández Palacín et al., 2010; Northouse, 2012; Powell, Butterfield & Parent, 2002). Cuando las mujeres desafían las normas sociales y tratan de acceder a puestos de liderazgo se produce una incoherencia entre los roles tradicionales de líder y de género y a menudo deben enfrentarse al rechazo social (Bowles & McGinn, 2005; Eagly & Karau, 2002; García-Retamero & López-Zafra, 2006; Hoyt & Blascovich, 2007; Rudman, 1998; Rudman & Glick, 2001).

Además, la efectividad del liderazgo depende de la actitud de los seguidores hacia el líder y en el caso de las mujeres líderes los seguidores suelen mostrarse reacios a aceptar la influencia de una persona que no encaja con la imagen ideal de líder (Hoyt, 2010). En consecuencia, los hombres muestran una mayor propensión a asumir una posición oficial de líder y las mujeres, en cambio, suelen adoptar roles informales de liderazgo como el de facilitador, organizador o coordinador (Andrews, 1992; Bowles & McGinn, 2005; Eagly & Karau, 1991; Fletcher, 2001).

La investigación sobre estilos de liderazgo femenino y masculino refleja que las mujeres no son menos efectivas que los hombres a la hora de desarrollar tareas de liderazgo (Hoyt, 2012). Tampoco se observa que estén menos motivadas para ejercer funciones de liderazgo o menos comprometidas con su trabajo que los hombres. Sin embargo, cuando tratan de acceder a cargos superiores a menudo deben hacer frente a estereotipos de género y asumir el desacuerdo social que ello implica.

 

3.3. Prejuicios

En línea con lo anterior, se puede afirmar que las barreras que más dificultan la promoción profesional de las mujeres son las relacionadas con los prejuicios y las expectativas estereotipadas de género. Un estereotipo es un conjunto de creencias acerca de las características de un grupo de personas independientemente de la diversidad real en los rasgos de dichas personas (Hamilton, Stroessner & Driscoll, 1994; Heilman, 1997; Powell, 2011). Los estereotipos de género además de influir sobre las percepciones acerca de las características generales que hombres y mujeres poseen también indican los rasgos y comportamientos adecuados que deberían tener (Burgess & Borgida, 1999; Eagly, 1987; Eagly & Karau, 2002; García-Ael, Cuadrado & Molero, 2012; Heilman, 2001; Prentice & Carranza, 2002; Rudman, Moss-Racusin, Phelan & Nauts, 2012). Respecto a las características vinculadas con el liderazgo, persisten todavía los estereotipos que establecen que las mujeres cuidan y atienden a las personas y los hombres asumen el control y se centran en la tarea (Heilman, 1997; Hoyt, 2012).

La teoría del rol social de género atribuye las diferencias en la conducta de hombres y mujeres a las distintas funciones sociales que tradicionalmente han desempeñado (Eagly, 1987). De acuerdo con esta teoría, en una determinada estructura social productiva, las personas asumen distintos roles de género y son coherentes con los requerimientos de dichos roles. De esta forma, los hombres tendrían valores individualistas y rasgos agéntico-instrumentales, vinculados con la asertividad y la dominación, debido a la práctica de los roles tradicionales que han desarrollado en la sociedad y las mujeres, en cambio, poseerían valores colectivistas y rasgos expresivo-comunales, relacionados con la preocupación por otras personas, derivados de las funciones asociadas usualmente a mujeres (Cuadrado, 2004; García-Ael, et al., 2012; Martínez Tola et al., 2006). Mediante la asignación de roles, las habilidades y motivaciones de hombres y mujeres se orientan en la dirección de los estereotipos (García-Leiva, 2005).

Teniendo en cuenta los estereotipos de género es posible relacionar distintos estilos de liderazgo con hombres y mujeres. Los rasgos estereotípicamente masculinos se vinculan con un estilo de liderazgo autoritario, directivo y centrado en la tarea y los rasgos estereotípicamente femeninos con un estilo de liderazgo democrático, participativo y centrado en las relaciones interpersonales (Eagly & Johnson, 1990; Fridell, Newcom Belcher & Messner, 2009; Gartzia & Van Engen, 2012; Oakley, 2000; Post, 2015; Powell, 2011; Van Engen & Willemsen, 2004). En la misma línea, el estilo de liderazgo transformacional basado en aspectos como la motivación, orientación, estimulación o capacitación de los seguidores se relaciona con la forma de liderar de las mujeres (Barberá Heredia & Ramos López, 2004; Dodd, 2012; Evans, 2010; Hoyt, 2010; Trinidad & Normore, 2005).

Diversos autores han asociado el estilo de liderazgo transformacional, frecuentemente empleado por las mujeres, con una mayor efectividad en el liderazgo (Brandt & Edinger, 2015; Burke & Collins, 2001; Eagly et al., 2003; Van Engen & Willemsen, 2004). Además, el actual contexto económico globalizado y en constante cambio parece demandar un estilo de liderazgo transformacional. En este sentido, varios autores mencionan su idoneidad en el entorno de alta competitividad e incertidumbre en el que operan las organizaciones que exige estructuras participativas y flexibles capaces de innovar y adaptarse a los cambios con rapidez (Powell, 2011; Psychogios, 2007; Ramos et al., 2003; Rosener, 1990; Tuuk, 2012).

Sin embargo, los datos actuales sobre participación femenina en la alta dirección continúan reflejando un considerable desequilibrio de género. Las mujeres siguen enfrentándose a prejuicios y expectativas negativas sobre su capacidad de liderazgo (Hoyt, 2010). Algunas autoras asocian un estilo de liderazgo femenino más participativo y democrático con los problemas de credibilidad a los que deben hacer frente las mujeres cuando tratan de emplear un estilo de liderazgo jerárquico y autoritario (Carli, 2001; Eagly & Johannesen-Schmidt, 2001; Ridgeway, 2001). En general, las mujeres se enfrentan a una mayor resistencia que los hombres cuando tratan de ejercer el liderazgo, especialmente cuando emplean estilos contrarios a los roles tradicionales de género. La investigación desarrollada por Schein (2001) refleja que, en distintos países analizados, las cualidades necesarias para ocupar puestos directivos se vinculan con los hombres, independientemente de cuáles sean los rasgos percibidos como masculinos o femeninos en las distintas culturas. Es decir, aunque las características requeridas para el éxito empresarial varíen de un país a otro, se sigue considerando que dichas características las poseen fundamentalmente los hombres.

Las diferencias culturales no parecen afectar a la percepción de las mujeres como menos propensas a tener los rasgos exigidos para el liderazgo empresarial y esto supone un obstáculo importante para su desarrollo profesional en puestos directivos. Entre otros aspectos, desde un enfoque psicosociológico, los estereotipos pueden afectar profundamente sobre el comportamiento de las personas a las que afecta (Steele, Spencer & Aronson, 2002). Es decir, la mera interpretación acerca de las capacidades o comportamiento de las personas puede influir de forma significativa sobre su forma de actuar (Kray, Thompson & Galinsky, 2001; Sekaquaptewa & Thompson, 2003). En el caso del liderazgo femenino, los estereotipos tradicionales de género que sugieren que las mujeres no poseen las características requeridas para el liderazgo, además de influir sobre la actitud de los seguidores, como se ha indicado anteriormente, también puede afectar negativamente sobre la conducta y el desarrollo profesional de las mujeres líderes.

De acuerdo con Rudman et al. (2012) los estereotipos de género sirven para reforzar la jerarquía de género que asigna un mayor estatus a los hombres así como un mayor acceso al poder y a los recursos. Estas autoras plantean que los comportamientos que desafían dicha jerarquía de género son censurados y las mujeres que presentan rasgos estereotípicamente masculinos, requeridos para la promoción en la mayor parte de las profesiones de alto estatus, corren el riesgo de ser sancionadas económica y socialmente.

En la misma línea, Heilman (2001) propone que los prejuicios y los estereotipos de género explican la escasez de mujeres en los puestos superiores de las organizaciones. De acuerdo con los planteamientos de esta autora, las dimensiones descriptiva y prescriptiva de los estereotipos producen distinto tipo de prejuicios. Los aspectos descriptivos, que indican cómo son las mujeres, y su discrepancia con lo que implica un puesto directivo de nivel superior fomentan la idea de que las mujeres no pueden desempeñar este tipo de trabajos de manera efectiva. Las cuestiones prescriptivas, que dictan como deberían comportarse las mujeres, pueden dar lugar al rechazo social cuando éstas prueban que son competentes. En definitiva, los estereotipos de género pueden frenar u obstaculizar en gran medida el desarrollo profesional de las mujeres en la alta dirección, dado que cuando existe alguna ambigüedad acerca de su competencia es probable que sean juzgadas como incompetentes y cuando su competencia es incuestionable corren el riesgo de ser penalizadas socialmente.

 

4. Estrategias orientadas al equilibrio de género en puestos de liderazgo

En línea con los planteamientos de Pons Peregort et al. (2013), entendemos que las barreras que impiden a las mujeres acceder a cargos de alta responsabilidad en las organizaciones tanto públicas como privadas suponen un coste considerable para toda la sociedad que ha invertido en la formación y preparación de estas personas. El desequilibrio entre el elevado nivel educativo de las mujeres y su desarrollo profesional implica un desperdicio de habilidades y recursos humanos en una economía global donde el capital humano constituye un factor clave de competitividad (European Commission, 2011).

Desde una perspectiva empresarial, varios estudios afirman que las organizaciones que aprovechan la diversidad en los puestos directivos de nivel superior pueden obtener un mejor rendimiento (Cox & Smolinski, 1994; European Commission, 2011; Nielsen & Huse, 2010; Post & Byron, 2015; U.S. Glass Ceiling Commission, 1995; Wittenberg-Cox & Maitland, 2009). Nielsen y Huse (2010) analizan un conjunto de compañías noruegas y afirman que existe una relación positiva entre la proporción de mujeres directoras de una empresa y su efectividad. Cox y Smolinski (1994) presentan la diversidad en los grupos de trabajo como una importante oportunidad económica ya que permite obtener ventajas competitivas en el ámbito del marketing, la creatividad o la resolución de problemas y favorece un mejor rendimiento de las organizaciones. En este sentido, Forsyth (2010) plantea la variedad de experiencias, conocimientos, perspectivas e ideas que aporta la diversidad a los grupos de trabajo y menciona una mayor capacidad para identificar nuevas estrategias y soluciones en los grupos heterogéneos. De acuerdo con Wittenberg-Cox y Maitland (2009), dada la complejidad y diversidad del mercado global actual, las compañías que reconocen el potencial de las mujeres en la alta dirección pueden obtener una ventaja frente al resto.

Por lo tanto, parece que desde un punto de vista estrictamente económico resulta beneficioso, tanto para las empresas como para el conjunto de la sociedad, fomentar la igualdad de oportunidades para el desarrollo profesional de todas las personas. En esta línea, son múltiples las medidas que pueden contribuir a eliminar las barreras de género y a lograr una representación equilibrada de hombres y mujeres en los puestos de liderazgo.

Las empresas que son conscientes de los beneficios que puede aportar la participación de las mujeres en los altos cargos directivos tratan de implementar políticas orientadas a alcanzar un equilibrio de género en dichos puestos. En este sentido, algunos cambios como la flexibilización de horarios o calendarios laborales que permitan una mayor compatibilidad entre la vida laboral y personal pueden favorecer el acceso de las mujeres a puestos de liderazgo (Cooper & Lewis, 1999). Al plantear un modelo de compatibilidad y flexibilidad es importante evitar que estas políticas se perciban como exclusivamente orientadas a las mujeres. Se trata de que mediante la mejora en las condiciones laborales tanto hombres como mujeres puedan desarrollar otras actividades en su vida personal sin tener que sacrificar sus carreras.

Igualmente, las acciones enfocadas a proporcionar el apoyo necesario a las mujeres en el acceso a puestos directivos, especialmente en aquellos aspectos en los que actualmente las organizaciones presentan más carencias, como la construcción de redes profesionales o la orientación en el desarrollo profesional, pueden favorecer el equilibrio de género en los altos cargos empresariales. Resulta fundamental ofrecer la preparación adecuada a las mujeres para los puestos de liderazgo mediante formación y experiencia práctica. Este tipo de acciones contribuye a hacer visibles e incluir a las mujeres en los canales de promoción y favorece el aprovechamiento de sus capacidades y talento. De esta forma, las empresas comprometidas con la diversidad emiten un mensaje positivo tanto dentro como fuera de la organización, especialmente a las mujeres con una alta cualificación que pueden acceder a los puestos directivos. También es importante que los planes de acción o cambio implementados sean evaluados. Entre otros aspectos, es conveniente medir la percepción de las mujeres sobre la utilidad de los planes de formación o acerca de las mejoras en las posibilidades de desarrollo.

Consideramos que las administraciones públicas juegan un papel importante en la sensibilización de las empresas acerca de los beneficios que puede aportar la diversidad de género en los equipos directivos. Resulta fundamental que los gobiernos establezcan políticas para persuadir al sector empresarial sobre la importancia de mejorar las oportunidades de desarrollo profesional de las mujeres. En este sentido, durante los últimos años las administraciones públicas han desarrollado diversas iniciativas orientadas al apoyo de las mujeres en el acceso a los cargos directivos (European Commission, 2011). Además de campañas para la introducción de la perspectiva de género en la gestión de recursos humanos, la construcción de redes profesionales o la orientación en el desarrollo profesional, es importante destacar los códigos de buen gobierno empresarial o incluso en el caso de algunos países la legislación que establece un porcentaje mínimo de mujeres en los ámbitos de decisión de las organizaciones. Igualmente, todas las medidas orientadas al emprendimiento empresarial de las mujeres suponen un avance importante en la participación femenina en puestos de liderazgo (Wirth, 2001).

Las políticas adoptadas por algunos países de la Unión Europea para impulsar el equilibrio de género, como reflejan los datos presentados en el segundo apartado, han tenido un impacto considerable. El caso de Noruega que establece por ley una representación mínima de mujeres de un 40% en los consejos de administración de las compañías es especialmente destacable (European Commission, 2011; Matsa & Miller, 2013). Esta normativa de cuotas afecta tanto a las empresas del sector público como del privado y su incumplimiento puede dar lugar a sanciones e incluso a la disolución de las empresas afectadas (European Commission, 2012). Siguiendo el modelo noruego algunos países como Francia, Italia y Bélgica también aplican leyes de cuotas que conllevan sanciones en caso de incumplimiento. En España la normativa para alcanzar el equilibrio de género en los puestos directivos tiene un carácter menos estricto y no incluye sanciones (Ley Orgánica 3/2007).

Sin embargo, aunque se han extendido las políticas de igualdad de género para fomentar el acceso de las mujeres a las posiciones de poder, las mejoras en este ámbito se han producido a un ritmo muy lento. En este sentido, es importante destacar que gran parte de los obstáculos mencionados en el presente trabajo están estrechamente relacionados con los estereotipos de género y con las expectativas que estos generan acerca de cómo son las mujeres y de cómo deben comportarse. En concreto, se ha indicado que los roles estereotipados de género producen distintos comportamientos laborales y en algunos casos una cultura empresarial menos orientada al desarrollo profesional de las mujeres. Igualmente, las mujeres deben enfrentarse a prejuicios acerca de su capacidad de liderazgo y en muchas ocasiones cuando acceden a puestos superiores corren el riesgo de ser sancionadas económica y socialmente. Como se ha señalado, se trata de creencias y actitudes instaladas en la sociedad que pueden constituir unos de los obstáculos más firmes y sólidos en el desarrollo personal y profesional de las personas y cuya transformación no se produce de manera rápida.

La eliminación de los prejuicios que impiden el acceso de las mujeres a los puestos de liderazgo requiere la adopción de medidas estructurales cuyo impacto se aprecia en el medio o largo plazo. Resulta fundamental fomentar una reflexión que profundice en los procesos que provocan situaciones de desequilibrio y que plantee nuevas formas para afrontarlas. La transformación de los estereotipos de género implica también un proceso de aprendizaje de toda la sociedad que puede ser impulsado, entre otros aspectos, por la incorporación de la perspectiva de género tanto en los distintos niveles del sistema educativo, como en los medios de comunicación o en el ámbito laboral.

Por lo tanto, con el fin de acelerar el cambio de una situación de desequilibrio que afecta a toda la sociedad, planteamos la necesidad de intensificar todas las acciones orientadas a incorporar el enfoque de género en los espacios de poder en el corto plazo. Simultáneamente, es importante impulsar un proceso de reflexión y aprendizaje más profundo que permita avanzar en la eliminación de las barreras relacionadas con los estereotipos de género que dificultan el desarrollo profesional de las mujeres. La investigación, especialmente en el área de humanidades y ciencias sociales, puede favorecer dicho proceso de análisis y aportar soluciones que permitan alcanzar un mayor bienestar social. Consideramos que una mejor comprensión de los factores que obstaculizan el equilibrio de género supone un acercamiento a las posibles soluciones para lograrlo (Eagly & Carli, 2007; Hoyt, 2010). En el mismo sentido, una educación que incluya la perspectiva de género puede ser un factor determinante para transformar las percepciones de la sociedad y avanzar en la construcción de un modelo social más justo.

 

5. Controversia sobre las cuotas de género en los órganos de poder

Entre las medidas orientadas a conseguir una representación equilibrada en los ámbitos de decisión en el corto plazo, unas de las más controvertidas son las que establecen una cuota o porcentaje mínimo de mujeres en los órganos de poder de las organizaciones. Generalmente, la legislación sobre cuotas de género está dirigida a las empresas de mayor tamaño y se implementa junto a otras medidas de carácter voluntario encaminadas a estimular el desarrollo profesional de las mujeres. Los países que han adoptado legislación vinculante en este sentido presentan avances considerables en cuestiones de equilibrio de género (European Commission, 2013).

Sin embargo, existe una postura contraria a este sistema que argumenta que este tipo de medidas contradicen el principio de igualdad de oportunidades y que priorizan la diversidad frente a los conocimientos y la experiencia. De acuerdo con esta idea, las cuotas de género son innecesarias dado que las mujeres cualificadas pueden acceder a los cargos de poder en función de sus méritos. Por el contrario, la postura que defiende un sistema de cuotas de género plantea la necesidad de transformar una realidad en la que el nivel de cualificación de las mujeres y su presencia en los puestos de liderazgo no están en absoluto equilibrados.

Como se ha mencionado a lo largo de este trabajo, las mujeres que tratan de acceder a puestos de liderazgo deben superar un conjunto de barreras que dificultan en gran medida el equilibrio de género en los ámbitos de poder. Esta situación impide el aprovechamiento de las capacidades y talento de las mujeres cuyo nivel de cualificación en la actualidad es equivalente al de los hombres. Muchos de los obstáculos de género a los que se enfrentan las mujeres no son fáciles de identificar y algunos de ellos requieren medidas a largo plazo y tiempo para poder ser superados definitivamente. El sistema de cuotas, aunque evidentemente no elimina las barreras de género, puede servir para compensar en el corto plazo una situación de partida desequilibrada y que supone un coste importante para toda la sociedad. Además, aunque el efecto de estas medidas se aprecia fundamentalmente en el corto plazo, una mayor presencia de mujeres en puestos de liderazgo también puede contribuir a generar modelos de referencia para otras mujeres más jóvenes y a transformar los estereotipos tradicionales de género (European Commission, 2011; Pons Peregort et al., 2013).

 

6. Conclusiones

El presente trabajo muestra la situación de desequilibrio de género en los puestos de liderazgo empresarial en los países occidentales. Actualmente, aunque el nivel de preparación de las mujeres es equivalente al de los hombres, la presencia de mujeres en los puestos directivos de nivel superior sigue siendo menor. La escasa representación femenina en los altos cargos de decisión de las grandes compañías de distintos países refleja que la situación actual todavía está alejada de una situación de equilibrio de género.

Entre las barreras que obstaculizan la participación femenina en la alta dirección hemos destacado las relacionadas con los estereotipos género y con los prejuicios que estos generan. En este sentido, hemos mencionado que los roles estereotipados de género producen diferencias en los comportamientos laborales de hombres y mujeres y pueden dar lugar a una cultura empresarial menos orientada al desarrollo profesional de las mujeres. En consecuencia, en muchas ocasiones, las mujeres cuentan con menos oportunidades y estímulos de promoción a nivel organizacional que los hombres. Igualmente, las expectativas acerca de cómo son las mujeres y de cómo deben actuar, a menudo, cuestionan su capacidad de liderazgo y pueden penalizar social y económicamente a las mujeres que acceden a puestos de nivel superior.

Gran parte de la investigación sobre estilos de liderazgo vincula a las mujeres con un estilo de liderazgo democrático, participativo y centrado en las relaciones con las personas. Igualmente, varios estudios mencionan la tendencia de las mujeres a emplear un estilo de liderazgo transformacional relacionado frecuentemente con un liderazgo más efectivo. Sin embargo, algunas autoras defienden que este tipo de liderazgo femenino responde a las reacciones negativas y al rechazo social al que deben hacer frente las mujeres cuando emplean un estilo de liderazgo directivo y autoritario asociado habitualmente con los hombres. En cualquier caso, los datos actuales sobre equilibrio de género en puestos directivos reflejan que la efectividad de un supuesto liderazgo femenino no parece ser suficientemente relevante como para vencer los obstáculos que dificultan el acceso de las mujeres a los puestos de responsabilidad.

Esta escasa presencia de mujeres en los altos cargos directivos supone un coste importante para el conjunto de la sociedad. El desequilibrio entre el nivel educativo de las mujeres y su desarrollo profesional implica un desperdicio de recursos humanos que impide aprovechar el talento y las capacidades de personas altamente cualificadas. Además, en términos de competitividad empresarial, las organizaciones con una baja representación femenina en los puestos superiores están renunciando a los beneficios que puede aportar la diversidad de género en los equipos directivos.

Por todo lo anterior, consideramos que es fundamental sensibilizar al sector empresarial acerca de las ventajas de aumentar la participación femenina en los altos cargos directivos. La intensificación de las medidas orientadas a mejorar las oportunidades de desarrollo profesional de las mujeres puede acelerar el cambio hacia una situación de equilibrio de género que beneficiaría a toda la sociedad. Todas las acciones dirigidas a favorecer la compatibilidad entre la vida personal y profesional de las personas así como las enfocadas a proporcionar el apoyo necesario a las mujeres para los puestos de liderazgo pueden producir resultados positivos.

Igualmente, nos parece importante combinar estas medidas con otras a más largo plazo encaminadas a eliminar los prejuicios que obstaculizan el acceso de las mujeres a los espacios de decisión. En este sentido, proponemos aumentar los esfuerzos dedicados a alcanzar un mayor conocimiento de todos los procesos que provocan situaciones de desequilibrio de género. También planteamos la necesidad de incorporar la perspectiva de género en distintos contextos, como el educativo o el laboral, con el fin de poder transformar las percepciones sociales que impiden a las mujeres acceder a cargos superiores. En definitiva, se trata de impulsar, tanto desde el ámbito de la investigación, como de la educación, un proceso de reflexión y aprendizaje de toda la sociedad que permita avanzar en la construcción de un modelo social más justo y por lo tanto conseguir un mayor bienestar social.

Por último, como futuras líneas de investigación, planteamos un análisis sobre la efectividad de las distintas medidas orientadas a aumentar la presencia femenina en los cargos directivos. Asimismo, en relación con las recomendaciones planteadas, nos parece fundamental ahondar en los procesos sociales y culturales que impiden una transformación definitiva hacia la igualdad de género en nuestra sociedad. Además de estudiar el modo en que se construyen los estereotipos de género que dificultan la promoción profesional de las mujeres, resulta esencial identificar la lógica discursiva a la que responden así como las posibles causas que determinan la persistencia de dichos prejuicios y normas sociales.



Referencias

Alonso Antón, A., Fernández Sainz, A., & Rincón Diez, V. (2015). Análisis de la actividad femenina y la fecundidad en España mediante modelos de elección discreta. Lecturas de Economía, 82, 127-157.

Álvarez-Llorente, G. (2002). Decisiones de fecundidad y participación laboral de la mujer en España. Investigaciones Económicas, 26(1), 187-218.

Álvarez Llorente, G., & Otero Giráldez, M.S. (2006). Abandono de la actividad empresarial en España: Un enfoque de género. Revista Europea de Dirección y Economía de la Empresa, 15(4), 69-86.

Andrews, P.H. (1992). Sex and gender differences in group communication: Impact on the facilitation process. Small Group Research, 23(1), 74-94. https://doi.org/10.1177/1046496492231005

Ariza, A., & Ugidos, A. (2007). Entrada a la maternidad: Efecto de los salarios y la renta sobre la fecundidad. Revista actualidad, 16, 1-30.

Ayman, R., Korabik, K., & Morris, S. (2009). Is transformational leadership always perceived as effective? Male subordinates’ devaluation of female transformational leaders. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 39(4), 852-879. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-1816.2009.00463.x

Babcock, L., & Laschever, S. (2003). Women don’t ask: Negotiation and the gender divide. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Barberá Heredia, E., & Ramos López, A. (2004). Liderazgo y discriminación de género. Revista de Psicología General y Aplicada, 57(2), 147-160.

Barberá Heredia, E., Ramos, A., Sarrió, M., & Candela, C. (2002). Más allá del techo de cristal. Revista del Ministerio de Trabajo y Asuntos Sociales, 40, 55-68.

Barberá Ribera, T., Estellés Miguel, S., & Dema Pérez, C.M. (2009). Obstáculos en la promoción profesional de las mujeres: El “techo de cristal”. 3rd International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Industrial Management, XIII Congreso de Ingeniería de Organización, Barcelona-Terrassa.

Belkin, L. (2003). The opt-out revolution. New York Times Magazine, October 26.

Bielby, D.D., & Bielby, W.T. (1988). She works hard for the money: Household responsibilities and the allocation of work effort. American Journal of Sociology, 93(5), 1031-1059. https://doi.org/10.1086/228863

Biernat, M., & Wortman, C.B. (1991). Sharing of home responsibilities between professionally employed women and their husbands. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 60(6), 844-860. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.60.6.844

Book, E.W. (2000). Why the Best Man for the Job is a Woman. New York: HarperCollins.

Bowles, H.R., Babcock, L,. & Lai, L. (2007). Social incentives for gender differences in the propensity to initiate negotiations: Sometimes it does hurt to ask. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 103, 84-103. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.obhdp.2006.09.001

Bowles, H.R., & McGinn, K.L. (2005). Claiming authority: Negotiating challenges for women leaders. In D.M. Messick & R.M. Kramer, The psychology of leadership: New perspectives and research. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Brandt, T.M., & Edinger, P. (2015). Transformational leadership in teams - the effects of a team leader’s sex and personality. Gender in Management: An International Journal, 30(1), 44-68. https://doi.org/10.1108/GM-08-2013-0100

Brush, C.G. (1992). Research on women business owners: Past trends, a new perspective and future directions. Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 16(4), 5-30.

Bureau of Labor Statistics (2016). Current Population Survey, 2015. Disponible online en: http://www.bls.gov/cps/tables.htm. (Fecha del último acceso: Septiembre, 2016).

Burgess, D., & Borgida, E. (1999). Who women are, who women should be: Descriptive and prescriptive gender stereotyping in sex discrimination. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 5(3), 665-692. https://doi.org/10.1037/1076-8971.5.3.665

Burke, S., & Collins, K.M. (2001). Gender differences in leadership styles and management skills. Women in Management Review, 16(5), 244-256. https://doi.org/10.1108/09649420110395728

Carli, L.L. (2001). Gender and Social Influence. Journal of Social Issues, 57(4), 625-641. https://doi.org/10.1111/0022-4537.00238

Carli, L.L., & Eagly, A.H. (2016). Women face a labyrinth: An examination of metaphors for women leaders. Gender in Management: An International Journal, 31(8), 514-527. https://doi.org/10.1108/GM-02-2015-0007

Carrasco, R. (2001). Binary choice with binary endogenous regressors in panel data: Estimating the effect of fertility on female labor participation. Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, 19(4), 385394. https://doi.org/10.1198/07350010152596637

Catalyst Knowledge Center (2016a). Fortune 500 Board Seats Held by Women (Percent). Disponible online en: http://www.catalyst.org/knowledge/fortune-500-board-seats-held-women. (Fecha del último acceso: Septiembre, 2016).

Catalyst Knowledge Center (2016b). Fortune 500 CEO Positions Held By Women. Disponible online en: http://www.catalyst.org/knowledge/fortune-500-ceo-positions-held-women. (Fecha del último acceso: Septiembre, 2016).

Center for American Women and Politics (2016). Current Numbers. Disponible online en: http://cawp.rutgers.edu/current-numbers. (Fecha del último acceso: Diciembre, 2016).

Cooper, C.L., & Lewis, S. (1999). Gender and the changing nature of work. In G.N. Powell, Handbook of gender and work. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781452231365.n3

Cox, T., & Smolinski, C. (1994). Managing diversity and glass ceiling initiatives as national economic imperatives. Washington, D.C.: Glass Ceiling Commission, U.S. Department of Labor. Disponible online en: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/key_workplace/117. (Fecha del último acceso: Septiembre, 2016).

Cuadrado, I. (2004). Valores y rasgos estereotípicos de género de mujeres líderes. Psicothema, 16(2), 270275.

Davia, M., & Legazpe, N. (2014). The Role of Education in Fertility and Female Employment in Spain: A Simultaneous Approach. Journal of Family Issues, 35(14), 1898-1925. https://doi.org/10.1177/0192513X13490932

De la Rica, S., & Ferrero, M.D. (2003). The effect of fertility on labour force participation: The Spanish evidence. Spanish Economic Review, 5(2), 153-172.

De Luis Carnicer, M.P., Martínez Sánchez, A., & Pérez Pérez, M. (2003). Género y nueva economía: ¿Se romperá el “techo de cristal”?. Acciones e Investigaciones Sociales, 17, 155-182.

Dodd, F. (2012). Women leaders in the creative industries: a baseline study. International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, 4(2), 153-178. https://doi.org/10.1108/17566261211234652

Eagly, A.H. (1987). Sex differences in social behavior: A social-role interpretation. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Eagly, A.H., & Carli, L.L. (2003). The female leadership advantage: An evaluation of the evidence. The Leadership Quarterly, 14(6), 807-834. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.leaqua.2003.09.004

Eagly, A.H., & Carli, L.L. (2004). Women and men as leaders. In J. Antonakis, A.T. Cianciolo & R.J. Sternberg, The nature of leadership. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781412952392.n378

Eagly, A.H., & Carli, L.L. (2007). Through the labyrinth: The truth about how women become leaders. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.

Eagly, A.H., & Johannesen-Schmidt, M.C. (2001). The leadership styles of women and men. Journal of Social Issues, 57(4), 781-797. https://doi.org/10.1111/0022-4537.00241

Eagly, A.H., Johannesen-Schmidt, M.C. & Van Engen, M.L. (2003). Transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership styles: A meta-analysis comparing women and men. Psychological Bulletin, 129(4), 569-591. https://doi.org/10.1037/0033-2909.129.4.569

Eagly, A.H., & Johnson, B.T. (1990). Gender and leadership style: A meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 108(2), 233-256. https://doi.org/10.1037/0033-2909.108.2.233

Eagly, A.H., & Karau, S.J. (1991). Gender and the emergence of leaders: A meta-analysis. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 60(5), 685-710. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.60.5.685

Eagly, A.H., & Karau, S.J. (2002). Role congruity theory of prejudice toward female leaders. Psychological Review, 109(3), 573-598. https://doi.org/10.1037/0033-295X.109.3.573

Ehrlich, E. (1989). The mommy track: Juggling kids and careers in corporate America takes a controversial turn. Business Week, March 20, 126-134.

European Commission (2011). The Gender Balance in Business Leadership. Commission staff working paper. Disponible online en: http://ec.europa.eu/justice/gender-equality/gender-decision-making/index_en.htm. (Fecha del último acceso: Septiembre, 2016).

European Commission (2012). Women in economic decision-making in the EU: Progress report. Disponible online en: http://ec.europa.eu/justice/gender-equality/document/index_en.htm. (Fecha del último acceso: Septiembre, 2016).

European Commission (2013). Women and men in leadership positions in the European Union, 2013. Disponible online en: http://ec.europa.eu/justice/gender-equality/document/index_en.htm. (Fecha del último acceso: Septiembre, 2016).

European Commission (2016). Database on women and men in decision-making. Disponible online en: http://ec.europa.eu/justice/gender-equality/gender-decision-making/database/index_en.htm. (Fecha del último acceso: Septiembre, 2016).

Eurostat (2016). Labour Force Survey series. Disponible online en: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/data/database. (Fecha del último acceso: Diciembre, 2016).

Evans, D. (2010). Aspiring to leadership … a woman’s world? An example of developments in France. Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, 17(4), 347-367. https://doi.org/10.1108/13527601011086577

Fernández Palacín, F., López Fernández, M., Maeztu Herrera, I., & Martín Prius, A. (2010). El techo de cristal en las pequeñas y medianas empresas. Revista de Estudios Empresariales, 1, 231-247.

Fletcher, J.K. (2001). Disappearing acts: Gender, power and relational practice at work. Boston: MIT Press.

Forsyth, D.R. (2010). Group dynamics. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Fridell, M., Newcom Belcher, R., & Messner, P.E. (2009). Discriminate analysis gender public school principal servant leadership differences. Leadership & Organization Development Journal, 30(8), 722-736. https://doi.org/10.1108/01437730911003894

García-Ael, C., Cuadrado, I., & Molero, F. (2012). Think-manager - Think-male vs. Teoría del Rol Social: ¿Cómo percibimos a hombres y mujeres en el mundo laboral?. Estudios de Psicología, 33(3), 347-357. https://doi.org/10.1174/021093912803758183

García-Leiva, P. (2005). Identidad de género: Modelos explicativos. Escritos de psicología, 7, 71-81.

García-Retamero, R., & López-Zafra, E. (2006). Congruencia de rol de género y liderazgo: El papel de las atribuciones causales sobre el éxito y el fracaso. Revista Latinoamericana de Psicología, 38(2), 245-257.

Gartzia, L., & Van Engen, M. (2012). Are (male) leaders “feminine” enough? Gendered traits of identity as mediators of sex differences in leadership styles. Gender in Management: An International Journal, 27(5), 292-310. https://doi.org/10.1108/17542411211252624

González Serrano, M.H., Valantine, I., Pérez Campos, C., Aguado Berenguer, S., Calabuig Moreno, F., & Crespo Hervás, J.J. (2016). La influencia del género y de la formación académica en la intención de emprender de los estudiantes de ciencias de la actividad física y el deporte. Intangible Capital, 12(3), 759-788. https://doi.org/10.3926/ic.783

Hamilton, D.L., Stroessner, S.J., & Driscoll, D.M. (1994). Social cognition and the study of stereotyping. In P.G. Devine, D.L. Hamilton & T.M. Ostrom, Social cognition: Impact on social psychology. New York: Academic Press.

Heilman, M.E. (1997). Sex discrimination and the affirmative action remedy: The role of sex stereotypes. Journal of Business Ethics, 16(9), 877-889. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1017927002761

Heilman, M.E. (2001). Description and prescription: How gender stereotypes prevent women’s ascent up the organizational ladder. Journal of Social Issues, 57(4), 657-674. https://doi.org/10.1111/0022-4537.00234

Helgesen, S. (1990). The female advantage: Women´s ways of leadership. New York: Doubleday.

Hoyt, C.L. (2010). Women, Men, and Leadership: Exploring the Gender Gap at the Top. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 4(7), 484-498. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-9004.2010.00274.x

Hoyt, C.L. (2012). Women and leadership. In P.G. Northouse, Leadership: theory and practice. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Hoyt, C.L., & Blascovich, J. (2007). Leadership efficacy and women leaders’ responses to stereotype activation. Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, 10(4), 595-616. https://doi.org/10.1177/1368430207084718

Institute of Women and Equal Opportunities (2016). Mujeres en Cifras - Poder y Toma de Decisiones - Poder Judicial, Órganos constitucionales y Organizaciones Internacionales.  Disponible online en:    http://www.inmujer.gob.es/MujerCifras/PoderDecisiones/PoderTomaDecisiones.htm. (Fecha del último acceso: Diciembre, 2016).

Jacobs, S. (1999). Trends in women’s career patterns and in gender occupational mobility in Britain. Gender, work and organization, 6(1), 32-46. https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-0432.00067

Junquera Cimadevilla, B. (2004). ¿Tienen menos éxito las empresas propiedad de mujeres? Una revisión de la literatura sobre la cuestión. Tribuna de Economía, 818, 245-269.

Kaufman, G., & Uhlenberg, P. (2000). The influence of parenthood on the work effort of married men and women. Social Forces, 78(3), 931-947. https://doi.org/10.2307/3005936

Keith, K., & McWilliams, A. (1999). The returns to mobility and job search by gender. Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 52(3), 460-477. https://doi.org/10.1177/001979399905200306

Kent, T.W. (2005). Leading and managing: It takes two to tango. Management Decision, 43(7/8), 10101017. https://doi.org/10.1108/00251740510610008

Kotter, J.P. (1990). A Force for Change: How Leadership Differs from Management. New York: Free Press.

Kray, L.J., Thompson, L., & Galinsky, A. (2001). Battle of the sexes: Gender stereotype confirmation and reactance in negotiations. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 80(6), 942-958.   https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.80.6.942

Ley Orgánica 3/2007, de 22 de marzo, para la igualdad efectiva de mujeres y hombres (BOE 23 March 2007).

Martínez Tola, E. (2009). Segregación vertical, discriminación indirecta por razón de género y cuotas de participación. III Congreso de Economía Feminista, Baeza.

Martínez Tola, E., Goñi Mendizabal, I., & Guenaga Garai, G. (2006). Beneficios de la incorporación de las mujeres en los puestos de gestión y dirección de empresas del sector privado: Una revisión bibliográfica. Defensoría para la Igualdad de Mujeres y Hombres.

Matsa, D.A., & Miller, A.R. (2013). A Female Style in Corporate Leadership? Evidence from Quotas. American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 5(3), 136-169. https://doi.org/10.1257/app.5.3.136

Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports (2016). Estadística de Estudiantes Universitarios, curso 2014-2015. Disponible online en:   http://www.mecd.gob.es/educacion-mecd/areas-educacion/universidades/estadisticas-informes/estadisticas/alumnado.html. (Fecha del último acceso: Septiembre, 2016).

Minniti, M., & Nardone, C. (2007). Being in someone else’s shoes: The role of gender in nascent entrepreneurship. Small Business Economics, 28(2-3), 223-238. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11187-006-9017-y

Nielsen, S., & Huse, M. (2010). The contribution of women on boards of directors: Going beyond the surface. Corporate Governance: An International Review, 18(2), 136-148. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8683.2010.00784.x

Nieva, V.F., & Gutek, B.A. (1981). Women and work: A psychological perspective. New York: Praeger.

Northouse, P.G. (2012). Leadership: Theory and practice. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Northouse, P.G. (2014). Introduction to Leadership: Concepts and Practice. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Oakley, J.G. (2000). Gender-based Barriers to Senior Management Positions: Understanding the Scarcity of Female CEOs. Journal of Business Ethics, 27(4), 321-334.   https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1006226129868

Pons Peregort, O., Calvet Puig, M.D., Tura Solvas, M., & Muñoz Illescas, C. (2013). Análisis de la Igualdad de Oportunidades de Género en la Ciencia y la Tecnología: Las carreras profesionales de las mujeres científicas y tecnólogas. Intangible Capital, 9(1), 65-90.

Post, C. (2015). When is female leadership an advantage? Coordination requirements, team cohesion, andteam interaction norms. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 36(8), 1153-1175.   https://doi.org/10.1002/job.2031

Post, C., & Byron, K. (2015). Women on boards and firm financial performance: A meta-analysis. Academy of Management Journal, 58(5), 1546-1571. https://doi.org/10.5465/amj.2013.0319

Powell, G.N. (1990). One more time: Do female and male managers differ?. The Executive, 4(3), 68-75. https://doi.org/10.5465/AME.1990.4274684

Powell, G.N. (2011). Women and men in management. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Powell, G.N., Butterfield, D.A., & Parent, J.D. (2002). Gender and managerial stereotypes: Have the times changed?. Journal of Management, 28(2), 177-193. https://doi.org/10.1177/014920630202800203

Powell, G.N., & Graves, L.M. (2003). Women and men in management. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Prentice, D.A., & Carranza, E. (2002). What women and men should be, shouldn’t be, are allowed to be, and don’t have to be: the contents of prescriptive gender stereotypes. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 26(4), 269-281. https://doi.org/10.1111/1471-6402.t01-1-00066

Psychogios, G.A. (2007). Towards the transformational leader: Addressing women’s leadership style in modern business management. Journal of Business and Society, 20(1/2), 169-180.

Ramos, A. (2005). Mujeres directivas: Un valor en alza para las organizaciones laborales. Cuadernos de Geografía, 78, 191-214.

Ramos, A., Barberá, E., & Sarrió, M. (2003). Mujeres directivas, espacio de poder y relaciones de género. Anuario de Psicología, 34(2), 267-278.

Ridgeway, C.L. (2001). Gender, Status, and Leadership. Journal of Social Issues, 57(4), 637-655. https://doi.org/10.1111/0022-4537.00233

Rosener, J.B. (1990). Ways Women Lead. Harvard Business Review, 68, 119-125.

Rosener, J.B. (1995). America´s competitive secret: Utilizing women as a management strategy. New York: Oxford University Press.

Rudman, L.A. (1998). Self-promotion as a risk factor for women: The costs and benefits of counter-stereotypical impression management. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 74(3), 629-645. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.74.3.629

Rudman, L.A., & Glick, P. (2001). Prescriptive gender stereotypes and backlash toward agentic women. Journal of Social Issues, 57(4), 743-762. https://doi.org/10.1111/0022-4537.00239

Rudman, L.A., Moss-Racusin, C.A., Phelan, J.E., & Nauts, S. (2012). Status incongruity and backlash effects: Defending the gender hierarchy motivates prejudice against female leaders. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48(1), 165-179. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2011.10.008

Ruizalba Robledo, J.L., Vallespín Arán, M., Martin-Sanchez, V., & Rodríguez Molina, M.A. (2015). The moderating role of gender on entrepreneurial intentions: A TPB perspective. Intangible Capital, 11(1), 92-101. https://doi.org/10.3926/ic.557

Sánchez Sellero, M.C., & Sánchez Sellero, P. (2013). El modelo de salarización en el mercado laboral gallego: Influencia del género. Intangible Capital, 9(3), 678-707. https://doi.org/10.3926/ic.422

Schein, V.E. (2001). A global look at psychological barriers to women’s progress in management. Journal of Social Issues, 57(4), 675-688. https://doi.org/10.1111/0022-4537.00235

Sekaquaptewa, D., & Thompson, M. (2003). Solo status, stereotype threat, and performance expectancies: Their effects on women’s performance. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 39(1), 68-74. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-1031(02)00508-5

Simonet, D.V., & Tett, R.P. (2012). Five Perspectives on the Leadership-Management Relationship: A Competency-Based Evaluation and Integration. Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, 20(2), 199-213. https://doi.org/10.1177/1548051812467205

Small, D.A., Gelfand, M., Babcock, L., & Gettman, H. (2007). Who goes to the bargaining table? The influence of gender and framing on the initiation of negotiation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 93(4), 600-613. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.93.4.600

Soler i Blanch, G., & Moreno Pérez, C.M. (2013). Inversión en la retribución no tangible para la conciliación laboral. Intangible Capital, 9(4), 1021-1041.

Spanish National Statistics Institute (2016a). Economically Active Population Survey. Annual Results. Disponible online en: http://www.ine.es/jaxiT3/Tabla.htm?t=4768&L=0. (Fecha del último acceso: Septiembre, 2016).

Spanish National Statistics Institute (2016b). Economically Active Population Survey. Quarterly Results. Disponible online en: http://www.ine.es/jaxiT3/Tabla.htm?t=4492&L=0. (Fecha del último acceso: Diciembre, 2016).

Steele, C.M., Spencer, S.J., & Aronson, J. (2002). Contending with group image: The psychology of stereotype threat and social identity threat. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 34, 379-440. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0065-2601(02)80009-0

Thoits, P.A. (1992). Identity structures and psychological well-being: Gender and marital status comparisons. Social Psychology Quarterly, 55(3), 236-256. https://doi.org/10.2307/2786794

Torres Martos, M.J., & Román Onsalo, M. (2012). Impacto de la ley de igualdad en el contenido de la negociación colectiva del sector andaluz de la construcción. Intangible Capital, 8(2), 447-471.

Trinidad, C., & Normore, A.H. (2005). Leadership and gender: a dangerous liaison?. Leadership & Organization Development Journal, 26(7), 574-590. https://doi.org/10.1108/01437730510624601

Tuuk, E. (2012). Transformational leadership in the coming decade: A response to three major workplace trends. Cornell HR Review, May 5, 1-6.

U.S. Department of Labor (1991). A Report on the Glass Ceiling Initiative. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Labor.

U.S. Glass Ceiling Commission (1995). Good for Business: Making Full Use of the Nation’s HumanCapital. Disponible online en: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/key_workplace/116/. (Fecha del último acceso: Septiembre, 2016).

Van Engen, M.L., & Willemsen, T.M. (2004). Sex and leadership styles: A meta-analysis of research published in the 1990s. Psychological Reports, 94(1), 3-18. https://doi.org/10.2466/pr0.94.1.3-18

Vecchio, R.P (2002). Leadership and gender advantage. The Leadership Quarterly, 13, 643-671. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1048-9843(02)00156-X

Ventura Fernández, R., & Quero Gervilla, M.J. (2013). Factores explicativos de la intención de emprender en la mujer. Aspectos diferenciales en la población universitaria según la variable género. Cuadernos de Gestión, 13(1), 127-149. https://doi.org/10.5295/cdg.100271rv

Wadman, M.K. (1992). Mothers who take extended time off find their careers pay a heavy price. Wall Street Journal, July 16.

Wirth, L. (2001). Breaking through the glass ceiling: Women in management. Geneva: International Labour Office.

Wittenberg-Cox, A., & Maitland, A. (2009). Why women mean business: Understanding the emergence of our next economic revolution. Chichester: Wiley.

Yukl, G., & Lepsinger, R. (2005). Why integrating the leading and managing roles is essential for organizational effectiveness. Organizational Dynamics, 34(4), 361-375.   https://doi.org/10.1016/j.orgdyn.2005.08.004




Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License

Intangible Capital, 2004-2017

Online ISSN: 1697-9818; Print ISSN: 2014-3214; DL: B-33375-2004

Publisher: OmniaScience