Massive open online courses in higher education: A data analysis of the MOOC supply

Massive open online courses in higher education: A data analysis of the MOOC supply

Julieth E. Ospina-Delgado1, Ana Zorio-Grima2, María A. García-Benau2

1Pontificia Universidad Javeriana Cali (Colombia)

2Universidad de Valencia (Spain)

Received May, 2016

Accepted August, 2016

Versión en español

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study is to analyze the factors influencing the MOOC supply level. Specifically, this paper analyzes certain internal and strategic factors associated with universities, such as prestige, public or private status, age, size (measured by the number of faculty members or students) and region.

Design/methodology: We apply a descriptive methodology and then use multivariate analysis to test five hypotheses related to the institutional profile of 151 universities in 29 countries. Empirical evidence is provided from universities offering MOOCs through the four of the most commonly used private global platforms that emerged as part of the booming MOOC movement (Udacity, Coursera, edX and MiríadaX).

Findings: The findings show some differences when prestige is measured according to the Shanghai ranking (model 1) and the Webometrics ranking (model 2). In both cases, the private nature of the university and the region (North America) are factors that have a significant influence on the MOOC university supply. Depending on both rankings, size and age are influential factors. It is important to emphasize that prestige is a significant factor according to model 2.

Research limitations/implications: MOOCs are a phenomenon with a growing trend, and for which the supply data change frequently. Therefore, the results of our empirical research are limited to a specific period.

Practical implications: This paper provides new empirical evidence for use in future studies to analyze and compare the behavior of the MOOC supply by different universities.

Social implications: This study contributes to the comprehension of the factors that influence the extent to which universities participate in the MOOC supply. It also suggests relevant aspects for innovation policies in university education, since universities must make strategic decisions in a competitive environment that affects their institutional philosophy.

Originality/value: This paper makes an empirical contribution to the existing international literature on MOOC supply. It analyzes the relevance of the factor of prestige, as measured by two university rankings, Webometrics, the emphasis of which is focused on visibility on the Internet, and Shanghai, in which emphasis is placed on the impact on scientific research.

Keywords: Massive Open Online Courses, Higher education, MOOC platforms, Universities, Prestige, MOOC supply

Jel Codes: A22, I23

1. Introduction

The University, as a social institution called upon to respond to the challenges of modernization and globalization, has incorporated many forms of information and communications technologies (ICT). As a result, new virtual educational settings have been generated, which have meant important transformations, ranging from the way knowledge is accessed to the very structure of the educational institutions (European Commission, 2013; UNESCO/COL, 2011).

The effects and trends of ICTs in higher education have been analyzed for more than a decade (Kirkup & Kirkwood, 2005; Alba Pastor, 2005). Taylor and Osorio (2005) predicted for this decade that North American university education would be firmly established as an export product to the world, based on the use of ICTs. This prediction seems to have become true with Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC). In fact, it is believed that the technological advances in higher education were not overly visible until the emergence of these courses (EUA, 2015), the rise of which since 2012 has been the subject of great debate in today's educational and pedagogical field (Ng'ambi & Bozalek, 2015; Sangrà, González & Anderson, 2015). Their importance lies in the proposal of a barrier-free education for anyone who has an Internet connection, thanks to their free and open characteristics, which are aspects that promote another of their main features: their massive access.

While they are a phenomenon originating in North American universities (Rodriguez, 2012; Waldrop, 2013), MOOCs do not form part of the formal university course offering and are taught via virtual education platforms that have, for the most part, been created as consortia for this purpose (e.g., Coursera, Udacity, edX, MiríadaX), which are offered by different non- and for-profit entities (Ong & Grigoryan, 2015; Pang, Tong & Na, 2014; Yuan & Powell, 2013). Some studies (Daniel, Vásquez & Gisbert, 2015; Yuan & Powell, 2013) consider the participation of the universities in the MOOC phenomenon to be the result of the technology-media convergence process and the consequence of the massification of higher education in the context of the cultural homogenization that is associated with globalization. Others consider MOOCs to be an opportunity for public universities with smaller budgets, and not the threat that was originally imagined, pointing out their benefits in terms of reaching social groups such as retirees or employees who wish to improve their technical performance, for whom these courses would be an intellectual challenge (Ong & Grigoryan, 2015). They are also seen as an opportunity to advance in lifelong learning (De Freitas, Morgan & Gibson, 2015), a view that is shared by official European bodies, which consider them to be a change agent in higher education (European Parliament, 2015; European Commission, 2013).

Two characteristics have set the MOOCs apart from the already well-established e-learning industry: their massiveness and openness (Atenas, 2015), mostly in the sense of their free cost rather than in the original sense of “open educational resources” (OER). However, these basic principles of openness, reuse and recombination (OECD, 2015) have been obscured by the fact that MOOCs might be initially free-of-charge, but the suppliers could sometimes add charges for additional services, such as accreditation and certification (Daniel et al., 2015; Atenas, 2015). This has resulted in the criticism that associates the boom of the MOOCs with economic and commercial gain.

Most of the research on MOOCs has focused more on aspects related to their demand, and less on their offering (Ospina & Zorio, 2016; Gašević, Kovanović, Joksimović & Siemens, 2014). In general, it is taken for granted that the educational institutions offer this type of courses mainly to expand their scope and institutional visibility, to attract more students and to build and maintain their brand (Sangrà et al., 2015; Daniel et al., 2015). These reasons have been identified in North American studies, and works have also recently been published based on questionnaires in Europe, which have added to the references on the offering and the development perspectives of MOOCs. According to the data from the European University Association, MOOCs represent one of the activities with the greatest growth potential in European universities (EUA, 2015). The Conference of Presidents of Spanish Universities (CRUE, 2015), in turn, indicates that the reasons why universities offer these courses are, first of all, innovation in learning, and secondly, visibility and the presence of university teaching on the Internet.

The novelty and timeliness of our study is highlighted by the recent research presented above, as we aim to analyze the MOOC supply through the four most popular platforms. Our findings identify the characteristics of the universities that are actively taking part in this educational trend. To begin with, five hypotheses are tested that are associated with the prestige, type (public or private), age, size and region of the university, and then a multivariate analysis is carried out to identify whether any of these characteristics of the universities has an influence on the MOOC offering. This work thus contributes new evidence of the empirical relationships that exist among variables associated with the profile of the universities and their level of MOOC offering, and in particular, shows the relevance of prestige as a strategic factor.

Following this introduction, the next section presents a review of the international literature on MOOCs and the formulation of the study hypotheses. The third section describes the data obtained, as well as the variables and the methodology used. Next, in the fourth section, an analysis of the results is presented, followed by a final section with the main conclusions derived from the work.

 

2. Theoretical framework and hypotheses development

The acronym MOOC is used generically to refer to two types of courses with different educational foundations (Sangrà et al., 2015; Clow, 2013). C-MOOCs are based on the educational principles of the “connectivism” proposed by Siemens (2004) as a theory of learning for the digital age, emphasizing the power of social interactions to autogenerate knowledge. Meanwhile, x-MOOCs are based on contents and the traditional concept of knowledge transmission and are more commonly found on the earliest and largest educational platforms that supply MOOCs such as Coursera, Udacity, edX and MiríadaX (Atenas, 2015; Rodriguez, 2013), on which this present work is focused.

From the perspective of the theory of disruptive innovations by Bower and Christensen (1995), MOOCs are described as an innovative practice involving an educational disruption (Yuan & Powell, 2013; Anderson & McGreal, 2012), and more precisely, a disruptive innovation of the market, by becoming an interesting product that combines a technological development with a new business market that promotes a more flexible type of low-cost training (Vásquez, López & Sarasola, 2013).

In spite of the novelty of the topic, the body of literature is continuously expanding (Sangrà et al., 2015; Gašević et al., 2014; Liyanagunawardena, Adams & Williams, 2013a), especially in terms of research on the MOOC demand-side. Christensen, Steinmetz, Alcorn, Bennett, Woods and Emanuel (2013) report that most of the participants in these courses are young people with higher education and employees from developed countries, who are both looking to satisfy their curiosity and improve their career profile. Yousef, Chatti, Wosnitza and Schroeder (2015) have grouped the reasons why students participate in MOOCs into eight clusters: mixed learning, flexibility, high-quality content, instructional design and learning methodologies, life-long learning, on-line learning, openness and student-focused learning.

Taking the perspective of the supply side, Hollands and Tirthali (2014) look into why institutions offer MOOCs, with a qualitative study of 83 interviews with leaders of 29 US institutions. They identify six main objectives: expanding the institutional scope and attracting a larger number of students (size), building and maintaining their brand (prestige), improving their finances by reducing costs or increasing income, improving their educational results, innovating in teaching-learning and conducting research on teaching and learning processes. Meanwhile, the study by Jansen, Schuwer, Teixeira and Aydin (2015), based on online surveys of 67 institutions of higher education in 22 European countries that offer MOOCs or that plan to do so indicates that, unlike in the United States, the most important objective is to create new opportunities for flexible learning. It also finds that the number of European universities offering MOOCs or that plan to do so increased from 58% in 2013 to 71.7% in 2014, while in the USA, according to the data from Allen and Seaman (2015), it decreased from 14.3% to 13.6%. Thus, Jansen et al. (2015) have concluded that the European universities seem to be more committed to the MOOC phenomenon than their US counterparts, to the point of becoming a major trend in Europe.

In Spain, a study sponsored by Telefónica, (Oliver, Hernández, Daza, Martin & Albó, 2014) with data prior to December 2013 indicates that 35% of the universities have at least one MOOC and that the phenomenon involves both universities with a tradition of distance learning as well as traditionally on-site universities. It also identified public universities as having a more extensive offering and Spain as the leader in MOOC offerings in Europe, a fact that has also been acknowledged by the CRUE (2015).

In this framework, this paper focuses on studying whether certain characteristic factors of an institution (prestige, type of university [public or private], age, size and region of origin) explain the level of university offering of MOOCs.

 

2.1. Prestige

Within the current dynamics of the internationalization of higher education, one of the most important common objectives among universities is to increase their reputation and prestige; as part of this, their position in the rankings plays a key role (European Parliament, 2015). As a matter of fact, in a competitive environment, reputation and institutional prestige are one of the factors that determine, among other things, the selection of a university and degree program by students (Sierra, 2012; Aguillo, Bar-Ilan, Levene & Ortega, 2010; Docampo, 2008). It has even been confirmed that prestige does not necessarily derive exclusively from strictly research activities (Horstschräer, 2012; Maringe, 2006).

For this reason, prestige has been analyzed as a strategic factor of universities (Hollands & Tirthali, 2014; Jordan, 2014; Ospina & Zorio, 2016), and is a term frequently used by MOOC platforms, which declare that their offering comes from the world's most prestigious universities (Ong & Grigoryan, 2015; Schuwer et al., 2015; Pang et al., 2014; Yuan & Powell, 2013). Reinforcing their own prestige is also one of the objectives sought by MOOC participants, according to Yousef et al. (2015). Therefore, it could be considered that the universities with the greatest prestige lead the offering with a larger number of MOOCs, as a clear sign of their commitment to educational innovation. Therefore, the first hypothesis proposed is:

H1: There is a significant positive relationship between the prestige of a university and its MOOC offering.

 

2.2. Public or private status

While it is true that MOOCs are a phenomenon in which both public and private universities participate, the existing literature associates it primarily with the interest of private agents, with substantial levels of investment (Yuan & Powell, 2013; Belleflamme & Jacqmin, 2014), due to a large extent to the growth trend in private education (UNESCO, 2009). With regard to US institutions, Hollands and Tirthali (2014) and Allen and Seaman (2014) indicate statistical differences between the types of institutions offering MOOCs, in which private institutions predominate. Likewise, Shrivastava and Guiney (2014) emphasize in their study a greater trend towards these courses in private universities. This is not the case in Spain, where there is a greater offering by public universities, which have benefited from the impulse of one of the most commonly used platforms, “MiríadaX”, which is the product of private alliances (Oliver et al., 2014). To validate this trend, the following hypothesis is proposed:

H2: Private universities have a greater offer of MOOCs than public universities.

 

2.3. Age

The age of the university has been analyzed in different studies on higher education strategies (Luque-Martínez, 2013; Guzmán, del Moral, González & Gil, 2013; Gallego-Álvarez, Rodríguez & García-Sánchez, 2011), which have found, for example, a significant negative relationship between the age of the university and the use of ICT (Iniesta, Sánchez & Schlesinger, 2013). The oldest universities, which have built their know-how over many years, tend to safeguard their corporate image more than younger institutions (Gallego-Álvarez et al., 2011) and as a result, they may be less enthusiastic about models whose effectiveness is still in the early stages, such as MOOCs. Based on this, the following hypothesis has been developed:

H3: There is a negative relationship between the age of a university and its MOOC offering.

 

2.4. Size

The size of the institution, measured in terms of the number of students or faculty members, is another factor analyzed in higher education literature (UNESCO, 2009; Luque-Martínez, 2013; Guzmán et al., 2013; Gallego-Álvarez et al., 2011). According to the study by Allen and Seaman (2014), larger US institutions, with more than 15,000 students, are more likely to offer MOOCs. Other studies (Hollands & Tirthali, 2014; SCOPEO, 2013) indicate that, in many cases, the initiative is a response to alleviate the pressure of the high-demand for "bottleneck" courses, a factor associated with the size in terms of the number of students. According to Ospina and Zorio (2016), a small size, measured in terms of the number of faculty members, is one the only condition present in one of the two solutions leading to non MOOC-intensiveness. Hence, we put forward that larger universities are the ones that have a greater level of resources to deal with this type of innovation, and thus the following hypothesis is proposed:

H4: There is a positive relationship between the size of a university and its MOOC offering.

 

2.5. Region

A study by Aguillo, Ortega and Fernández (2008) has led us to consider the importance of this factor, by suggesting a trend on the part of US universities to make better, more in-depth use of the Internet. Furthermore, even though it has been acknowledged that the first MOOC was launched in Canada in 2008, and the literature indicates the preponderance of the phenomenon in the USA (Schuwer et al., 2015; Yousef et al., 2015; Shrivastava & Guiney, 2014; Liyanagunawardena et al., 2013a; SCOPEO, 2013), new participants in other regions are joining the offering, indicating even a greater, growing trend related to this phenomenon in Europe (Jansen et al., 2015). As a result, it would be interesting to validate this aspect through the following hypothesis:

H5: US universities have a greater offer of MOOCs than the universities from the rest of the world.

 

3. Study design: Methodology, sample and variable definitions

The methodology consists, firstly, of a descriptive statistical analysis for an initial approximation to the study variables, followed by a bivariate analysis that makes it possible to explore the importance of each of the variables available in relation to the MOOC offering. Secondly, a multiple regression analysis enables us to corroborate which of the variables included in the model have some degree of effect on the level of MOOC offering.

 

3.1. Sample

There are several universities that offer MOOCs through either their own virtual e-learning platforms or pre-existing Learning Management Systems (LMS), such as Blackboard or Moodle (Ong & Gregorian, 2015), but for the purposes of this study, we are interested in those that have decided to offer them through one of four external platforms. Our sample includes 151 universities from 29 countries, organized into four large regions, and with a total offering of 904 courses (see Table 1). The universities correspond to those that on June 30, 2014 offered at least one MOOC on one of the first global platforms created by private initiative, and which have had the greatest visibility and distribution during the boom of the MOOC movement: Udacity, Coursera, edX and MiríadaX (Sangrà et al., 2015; Jordan, 2014; Clow, 2013; Anderson & McGreal, 2012; Daniel, 2012). MOOCs offered by providers other than universities were excluded (Raposo, Martínez & Sarmiento, 2015).

 

Region

North America

Central and South America

Europe

Asia and Oceania

Total

 

Countries

Canada USA

Argentina Colombia Mexico Peru Puerto Rico Dominican Rep.

Germany Belgium Denmark Spain France Holland U. Kingdom Italy Russia Sweden Switzerland

Australia China South Korea Hong Kong India Israel Japan Singapore Taiwan Turkey

Coursera

Univ.

42

2

25

14

83

MOOC

345

12

97

55

509

Countries

2

1

10

9

22

edX

Univ.

16

0

8

10

34

MOOC

146

0

31

46

223

Countries

2

0

6

6

14

Udacity

Univ.

2

0

0

0

2

MOOC

21

0

0

0

21

Countries

1

0

0

0

1

Miríada X

Univ.

0

10

22

0

32

MOOC

0

16

135

0

151

Countries

0

5

1

0

6

Total

Univ.

60

12

55

24

151

MOOC

512

28

263

101

904

Countries

2

6

11

10

29

Table 1. Description of the sample

 

3.2. Variables

To measure prestige (H1),  we use two rankings that are widely recognized around the world, but that have substantial methodological differences between them: Shanghai (ARWU, 2014), whose classification prioritizes research activity (Aguillo et al., 2010; Aguillo et al., 2008; Docampo, 2008) and Webometrics (Cybermetrics Lab, 2014), which classifies the universities according to their visibility on the Internet (Chen, Tang, Wang & Hsiang, 2015; Garde-Sánchez, Rodríguez & López, 2013; Aguillo et al., 2008). Using a qualitative approach (fsQCA), Ospina and Zorio (2016) demonstrate that the absence of prestige, measured through the Webometrics ranking, is a sufficient condition to lead to a non-intensive MOOC profile by universities. The Shanghai ranking is also included in the present study to check whether, like Webometrics, it is related to the MOOC offering.

The SHANGHAI variable has thus been assigned the value of 0 when the university is not present in the ranking, and the value of 1 if it is included. The WEBOMETRICS variable has been assigned its value according to four intervals, depending on each university's classification in the ranking, with 1 meaning that the university holds one of the last positions (above one thousand) and 4 when it holds one of the top positions (in the first one hundred positions). For H2, the variable TYPE has been given a value of 0 when the university is public and a value of 1 when it is private. The hypothesis concerning the age of the university (H3) is measured by the variable LNAGE, which constitutes the Napierian logarithm of the age of the institution in years since it was founded. To measure the size of the university (H4), in line with previous studies (Allen & Seaman, 2014; Guzmán et al., 2013; Gallego-Álvarez et al., 2011), two variables have been used, LNFACULTY and LNSTUD, which represent the natural logarithm of the number of faculty members associated with the institution and the number of students registered at the university, respectively; the bivariate analysis makes it possible to select the variable between the two that offers closest relationship and the highest level of significance with the dependent variable. The variable REGION (H5) groups the country of origin of each university (Guzmán et al., 2013) into four large regions: North America, Central and South America, Europe and Asia, and Oceania.

Furthermore, following existing literature (Ospina & Zorio, 2016; Daniel et al., 2015; Bartolomé & Steffens, 2015; Hollands & Tirthali, 2014; Liyanagunawardena, Adams & Williams, 2013b; SCOPEO, 2013) we use two control variables which are the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita and the level of penetration of the Internet. Data for these variables was gathered from the World Bank (2014). The GDP variable is assigned the value of 0 when the GDP per capita of the university's country is less than the mean of the 29 countries in the sample, which in this case is USD $50.000, and the value of 1 when if greater. The variable INTERNET takes the value of 0 when the Internet penetration (% of the population with access) in the country of the university is less than the mean of the countries in the sample, which in this case is 70%, and the value of 1 if larger.

To analyze the relationship of the MOOC offering according to the described variables, two models of multiple regression are proposed:

  • incorporating the SHANGHAI variable as a measure of prestige more focused on the impact of scientific production, and on the other hand,

  • incorporating the WEBOMETRICS variable, which is focused mainly on the overall impact of the university on the Web.

In both cases, only one of the variables associated with size is considered:

MOOCi = β0  + β1 (SHANGHAI) + β2 (TYPE) + β3 (LNAGE) + β4 (LNFACULTY) + β5 (REGION) + β6 (GDP) + β7 (INTERNET)  + ε i

(1)

 

MOOCi = β0  + β1 (WEBOMETRICS) + β2 (TYPE) + β3 (LNAGE) + β4 (LNFACULTY) + β5 (REGION) + β6 (GDP) + β7 (INTERNET)  + ε i

(2)

 

where MOOC is the dependent variable that represents the number of MOOCs offered by the University; “i” represents each university included in the sample; β0 is the constant term parameter; and each of the coefficients of the variables is represented by β1,… β7. The error term, ε, accounts for the factors not observed in the model. The program Stata v.12 was used for the statistical processing of the data.

 

4. Analysis of the results

Below is an analysis of the descriptive statistics, followed by the bivariate analysis, and finally the multiple regression analysis.

 

4.1. Descriptive analysis

Tables 2 and 3 present the descriptive statistics for all of the variables obtained. The first relevant aspect shown by Table 2 is the high level of dispersion of the dependent variable MOOC (S.D.=6.3), which is due to the presence of many universities offering few courses. The minimum value 1 corresponds to 30 universities (20%) that as of the study date only had one MOOC (the lowest offer), while very few universities had a high offer of Moocs, with only one university reaching the maximum value of 32 courses (the greatest offering; 0.7%). Among those with the least offering, 70% are public, 47% are European and 20% are North American; the university with the maximum offering is private and North American. In the 25th percentile, with two MOOCs, are 47 universities (30%) and in the 50th percentile, with 4, are 90 universities (58%), which demonstrates an important distance between the universities with the least and greatest offering.

 

Variable/(Hypothesis)

Mean

S.D.

Min.

25th p.

50th p.

75th p.

Max.

MOOC

5.99

6.326

1

2

4

7

32

LNAGE (H3)

4.67

0.924

2.398

3.97

4.859

5.198

6.679

AGE*

156.6

142.9

11

53

129

181

796

LNFACULTY (H4)

7.57

1.007

4.682

6.908

7.727

8.266

10.535

FACULTY*

3,123.8

4,346.4

108

1,000

2,269

3,888

37,610

LNSTUD (H4)

9.78

1.075

5.112

9.236

9.965

10.435

13.038

STUD*

30,406.5

49,833.4

166

10,264

21,260

34,046

459,550

* Original values of the variable before logarithmic transformation

Table 2. Descriptive statistics of continuous variables

 

The mean age of the universities is 156 years; 81% of the total are less than 200 years old and only 10% have an age of between 300 and 600 years, with two European (specifically, Spanish) universities having the minimum and maximum values. Of the North American institutions (60), 57% are below the mean, with the youngest being 49 and the oldest 378 years old.

With regard to size, the minimum value for both faculty (108) and students (166) is held by the same private North American university, while the maximum value for faculty (37,610) corresponds to a public Central American university and the maximum number of students (459,550) is held by a public North American university.

 

Variable/(Hypothesis)

Values

Frequency - Universities

%

Frequency - MOOC

%

SHANGHAI

(H1)

0: Not in ranking

51

33.8

204

22.6

1: In ranking

100

66.2

700

77.4

Total

151

100.0

904

100.0

WEBOMETRICS

(H1)

1 (>1001)

28

18.6

76

8.4

2 (501-1000)

15

9.9

78

8.6

3 (101-500)

45

29.8

203

22.5

4 (1-100)

63

41.7

547

60.5

Total

151

100.0

904

100.0

TYPE

(H2)

0: Public

105

69.5

566

62.6

1: Private

46

30.5

338

37.4

Total

151

100.0

904

100.0

REGION

(H5)

1 North America

60

39.8

512

56.6

2 Central & South Am.

12

7.9

28

3.1

3 Europe

55

36.4

263

29.1

4 Asia & Oceania

24

15.9

101

11.2

Total

151

100.0

904

100.0

Control variables 

GDP

0: <USD $50,000

64

42.4

291

32.2

1: >USD $50,000

87

57.6

613

67.8

Total

151

100.0

904

100.0

INTERNET

0: <70%

24

15.9

91

10.1

1: >70%

127

84.1

813

89.9

Total

151

100.0

904

100.0

Table 3. Frequencies of the categorical variables

 

In terms of prestige, 66.2% of the universities in our sample are in the Shanghai ranking, and they provide most of the MOOC offering (77.4%); likewise, 71.5% of the universities fall within the first 500 positions on the Webometrics ranking (categories 3 and 4 of the variable), accounting for 83% of the courses.

Most of the universities (69.5%) are public and provide 62.6% of the offering, however, of them, 71% have an offering that is below the mean, i.e., they offer fewer than six courses.

With regard to geographic region, 39.8% of the universities are in North America and account for 56.6% of the offering; 36.4% are located in Europe and offer 29% of the courses; 15.9% belong to the regions of Asia and Oceania, with 11% of the MOOCs; and the Central and South American region provides 7.9% of the universities and 3% of the offer.

Furthermore, 57% of the universities analyzed, which participate with an offering of 68% of the MOOCs, belong to countries whose GDP per capita is greater than USD $50,000, while 85% of the universities, representing 90% of the MOOC offering, are form countries with an Internet penetration greater than 70%.

 

4.2. Bivariate analysis

Table 4 shows the correlations between the continuous independent variables and the MOOC offering variable. Even though the correlation coefficients of the two size variables (LNFACULTY and LNSTUD) with the dependent variable are not high, they show a 5% level of significance. This first analysis suggests that the age of the university is not related to its MOOC offering, however, considering the approach of our hypothesis, H3, it must not be ruled out for the following analysis.

 

 

MOOC

LNAGE

LNFACULTY

LNSTUD

MOOC

1

 

 

 

LNAGE

0.169

1

 

 

LNFACULTY

0.251*

0.366*

1

 

LNSTUD

0.203*

0.285**

0.710**

1

(**) p<0.01 (*) p<0.05 (Spearman's correlation coefficient)

Table 4. Correlations between continuous variables

 

The contrast tests for the categorical variables, shown in Table 5, reveal a high level of statistical significance (1% and 5%) for all variables, except TYPE. This includes the control variables, which suggests the importance of these variables in the analysis of the level of university MOOC offering.

 

Variable

Kruskal-Wallis test

Chi-square

Mann-Whitney test

Z

Asympt. sign. (bilateral)

WEBOMETRICS

28.072

 

0.000**

REGION

23.225

 

0.000**

SHANGHAI

 

-3.284

0.001**

TYPE

 

-0.424

n.s.

GDP

 

-3.012

0.003**

INTERNET

 

-2.360

0.018**

Contrast variable: MOOC.  n.s. = not significant

(**) p<0.01 (*) p<0.05

Table 5. Contrast tests for categorical variables

 

4.3. Multivariate analysis

In order to avoid autocorrelation among the variables referring to size, the variable LNSTUD, which presented the lowest correlation with the dependent variable, was excluded from the regression analysis. The absence of multicolinearity problems is confirmed by the variance inflation factor, which was lower than 10 (VIF=2.44 and 2.41) in the two models. For the variable REGION, the results are shown according to the top level in the category, i.e., Asia and Oceania. Both models (Table 6) reached overall significance (heteroscedasticity-robust F statistic=0.000) and a moderate level of predictive power, which was lower in the model (1) estimated with the SHANGHAI variable (R2=0.192) than in that estimated with WEBOMETRICS (R2=0.267). Although it is not evident in the table, the inclusion of the control variables resulted in better results in terms of significance in both models.

 

Independent Variables

Model (1)

Model (2) 

Coeff.

t

p-value

Coeff.

t

p-value

SHANGHAI

2.1171

1.44

 0.153

 

 

 

WEBOMETRICS

 

2.6325

4.51

0.000***

TYPE

3.0657

1.85

0.067*

4.2499

2.48

0.014**

LNAGE

-0.5235

-0.84

0.404

-1.0215

-1.79

0.076*

LNFACULTY

1.4419

2.40

0.018**

0.7985

1.48

0.140

REGION (Ref: Asia and Oceania)

  North America

4.6443

3.15

0.002***

4.4570

3.48

0.001***

  Europe

1.9554

1.41

0.162

2.8730

2.37

0.019**

  Central & South Am.

-2.4824

-1.32

0.188

-0.8908

-0.57

0.569

Control variables 

 

GDP

-1.5203

-1.30

0.197

-1.8341

-1.79

0.076*

INTERNET

-0.3409

-0.20

0.839

-0.5033

-0.34

0.738

Num. of observations

151

151

F Statistic   

4.05

4.95

Probability

0.000

0.000

R square

0.192

0.267

(***) p<0.01 (**) p<0.05 (*) p<0.10 

Table 6. Multiple regression for factors that influence the MOOC offering

 

The results of the regression for the model (1), with the SHANGHAI variable, indicate that the variables which influence the MOOC offering are TYPE (p<0.10), for which the coefficient indicates a three course advantage for private universities over public universities; LNFACULTY (p<0.05), which indicates that as this variable increases, so does the unit representing the level of offering; and REGION, specifically, North American with a p-value<0.01.

Model (2), which uses the variable WEBOMETRICS to measure prestige, indicates that the variables which influence the MOOC offering are: WEBOMETRICS (p<0.01), as a university's position in the ranking moves up one level according to our categories, its offering increases by 2 courses; the variable TYPE (p<0.05), which reflects a higher level of significance and a larger coefficient than in model (1), but also indicates the influence of private university status as compared to public status in terms of MOOC offering; LNAGE, which shows a significant negative relationship (p<0.10) between the age of the universities and their MOOC offering; and the variable REGION, in which, in addition to North America (p<0.01) as in model (1), Europe also presents a significant p-value<0.05, which demonstrates that North American universities have a 4 course advantage over the Asia and Oceania region, while in the case of European universities, the positive difference is 2 courses as compared to the reference region.

In both models, the common variables that reveal a significant positive influence on MOOC offering are TYPE and REGION (North America), which would suggest that H2 and H5 should be accepted. The variable LNFACULTY reveals an influence only in model (1), and thus H4 could be partially accepted. Likewise, judging from the results of model (2), the hypotheses related to prestige (H1) and age (H3) could also be partially accepted. In general terms, model (2) produces better results to explain the MOOC offering by universities.



5. Conclusions

The literature analyzed provides a broad perspective that reflects, among the most important aspects, the concern by researchers for the way in which universities must face the challenges posed by the new educational models. MOOCs constitute a new scenario in virtual education that has a key place in the academic debate on the present and future of universities. While far from being a solution to the weaknesses and barriers of the educational system, they present important challenges for educational communities in terms of rethinking, in all disciplines of knowledge, the teaching-learning processes within a context of a society that is undergoing permanent change and is shaped by the tension of the dynamics of globalization and the mass media.

This article provides empirical evidence of the relationships between the variables associated with the institutional profile of universities in different regions and their level of massive open course offerings, through the four most commonly used global platforms during the MOOC boom. Five hypotheses were tested, one associated with a strategic factor, the prestige of the university, and four associated with internal factors, namely the public or private nature of the university, the size, the age and the geographic region. Two external factors were considered as control variables in the analysis: GDP per capita and the Internet penetration in the university's country of origin. Given the importance the strategic factor "prestige" had in this study, it was estimated by two models, one using presence in the SHANGHAI ranking and the other using 4 categories according to the WEBOMETRICS ranking.

The results obtained in the regression analysis for both models suggest interesting data for the interpretation of the level of MOOC offer in relation to the ranking variables that measure the prestige of a university. When prestige is measured by the Shanghai ranking, this variable does not prove significant in order to explain the level of MOOC offering. However, prestige is a significantly influential variable when measured by the Webometrics ranking, in line with Ospina and Zorio (2016). In the light of the results obtained, it must be kept in mind that the Webometrics ranking is based mainly on the web impact of the universities, in other words, their visibility, and not as much on the impact of their scientific activity, as in the Shanghai ranking (Aguillo et al., 2010; Aguillo et al., 2008; Docampo, 2008). It is therefore interesting to consider that those universities which have not necessarily earned their prestige only through mostly research work, but rather by building their visibility on the Web, are those that lead the MOOC offering, even though, as Daniel (2012) claims, they are not necessarily leaders in online instruction. This could be indicative of a trend in universities that are not precisely engaged intensively in research to excel by means of their MOOC offering, presenting themselves as the most innovative, an aspect also highlighted by the approach of prior research (see for instance Ospina & Zorio, 2016; Hollands & Tirthali, 2014).

Our study also reveals that private universities are the ones that have the most significant weight in the MOOC offering, in line with the studies by Hollands and Tirthali (2014) and Allen and Seaman (2014) based on North America. Our sample consists mainly of public universities (70%). However, it is the private universities that participate the most in the MOOC offer, as described by Shrivastava and Guiney (2014), who see greater resistance to this learning phenomenon in public institutions, not only due to the financial costs, but also the political costs that tend to be greater in public as opposed to private institutions (Gallego-Álvarez et al., 2011) and that arise particularly in relation to the teaching staff when the institution decides upon the financial model to support this type of innovation (Hollands & Tirthali, 2014).

In terms of the region, in spite of the fact that increasingly more and more European universities participate in the offer (Jansen et al., 2015) (in fact, the analyzed sample includes 55 European as compared to 60 North American institutions), the study shows, to a high level of statistical significance, that the North American universities have the most intensive MOOC offering. References to the magnitude of risk capital investments and donations by private organizations to support this innovation in the USA, in relation to both universities and other suppliers (Belleflamme & Jacqmin, 2014; Hollands & Tirthali, 2014), can explain this result, as could the results of Aguillo et al. (2008), whose analysis of the Web ranking revealed a digital academic gap between North American universities and their European counterparts. However, the results obtained when measuring prestige with the WEBOMETRICS variable also reflect the importance of Europe in this trend, which leads to the speculation that this region is increasingly accessing mechanisms available on the Web to improve their indicators of international visibility.

Moreover, the result from model (2), which measures prestige with the WEBOMETRICS variable, support the hypothesis that the newest universities participate more intensively in the MOOC offering, which suggests that there is a more cautious attitude on the part of the oldest universities towards this type of innovation, participating with one or only a few courses, which is more in line with the "wait and see" approach described by Hollands and Tirthali (2014).

Likewise, the results of measuring prestige with the SHANGHAI variable support the hypothesis related to size, as measured by the number of faculty members at the university. However, in the presence of the WEBOMETRICS variable, the number of faculty members cannot be identified as a significant factor of the number of MOOC offered. The explanation for this could lie in the fact that both in North America (e.g., University of Maryland, 2013; University of Illinois, 2014; West Virginia University, 2015) and in Europe (Jansen et al., 2015; EUA, 2015), many of the efforts related to this phenomenon are promoted by one-off institutional projects and not as an activity forming part of the teaching mission, which implies an increase in staff.  

The results obtained suggest implications in the field of education, as they permit an empirical approach to the understanding of factors that have an influence on whether universities decide to participate more or less intensively in an initiative that in many ways is signaling new trends in how we conceive education. Likewise, it indicates relevant aspects for university policy on educational innovation, as universities must make strategic decisions related to their institutional philosophy, for example, whether or not to build their prestige based on greater international visibility, participating in the massiveness trend associated with x-MOOC-type platforms. Along these lines, there are still many challenges left to overcome, among which the financial aspect is one of the most significant. In relation to costs, a complex debate has arisen in relation to teaching staff, such as that described by Hollands and Tirthali (2014), that the first edition of a course is taught by associate professors and subsequent editions by non-tenured or outsourced instructors. Others consider the recognition of MOOCs within the European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) to be an opportunity (Schuwer et al., 2015). This possibility aside, it would be interesting to know whether the assessment of these courses by MOOC students’ prospective employers depends on the prestige of the platform or of the university offering them (Rodriguez, 2012). In any case, the opportunity should be taken to develop a distinctive MOOC mission for the university or use it to improve its different missions, which as Daniel (2012) states, "would mean a true revolution in MOOCs" (pp. 14).

Finally, one limitation of our study should be acknowledged. As MOOC offering is a growing trend that receives increasingly more financial backing from different organizations and agents, such as in the recent case of Europe (Jansen et al., 2015), the data are constantly changing. Nonetheless, future research may incorporate new variables , analyzing maybe the changes in the MOOC offering over time and understanding how universities around the world become involved in this global trend. It will be very interesting to find out how universities respond to the innovation needs of online instruction and whether they adopt different specialization strategies.



Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank the University of Valencia for its financial support (UV-SFPIE_GER16-415408). They would also like to express their appreciation for the comments and contributions received at the II Workshop on Business, Economics and e-Learning (BEeL 2014) in Barcelona, where a preliminary version of this work was presented.

 

References

Academic Ranking of World Universities – ARWU (2014). Available online in:  http://www.shanghairanking.com/es/ARWU2014.html

Aguillo, I., Bar-Ilan, J., Levene, M., & Ortega, J. (2010). Comparing university rankings. Scientometrics, 85, 243-256. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11192-010-0190-z

Aguillo, I., Ortega, J., & Fernández, M. (2008). Webometric Ranking of World Universities: Introduction, Methodology, and Future Developments. Higher Education in Europe, 33, 233-244. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03797720802254031

Alba Pastor, C. (2005). El profesorado y las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación en el proceso de convergencia al Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior. Revista de Educación, 337, 13-36.

Allen, E., & Seaman, J. (2014). Grade Change-Tracking Online Education in the United States. Babson Survey Research Group; Pearson; Sloan-C. Available online in:  http://onlinelearningconsortium.org/publications/survey/grade-change-2013

Allen, E., & Seaman, J. (2015). Grade Level: Tracking Online Education in the United States. Babson Survey Research Group; Pearson; Sloan-C. Available online in:  http://www.onlinelearningsurvey.com/reports/gradelevel.pdf

Anderson, T., & McGreal, R. (2012). Disruptive Pedagogies and Technologies in Universities. Educational Technology & Society, 15(4), 380-389.

Atenas, J. (2015). Modelo de democratización de los contenidos albergados en los MOOC. Universities and Knowledge Society Journal, 12(1), 3-14. http://dx.doi.org/10.7238/rusc.v12i1.2031

Bartolomé, A., & Steffens, K. (2015). ¿Son los MOOC una alternativa de aprendizaje?. Comunicar, 44, 91-99. http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C44-2015-10

Belleflamme, P., & Jacqmin, J. (2014). An Economic Appraisal of MOOC Platforms: Business Models and Impacts on Higher Education. SSRN-id2537270. http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2537270

Bower, J.L., & Christensen, C.M. (1995). Disruptive technologies: Catching the wave. Harvard Business Review, January-February, 43-53. Available online in:http://www.immagic.com/eLibrary/ARCHIVES/GENERAL/JOURNALS/H950130C.pdf

Chen, K.H., Tang, M.C., Wang, C.M., & Hsiang, J. (2015). Exploring alternative metrics of scholarly performance in the social sciences and humanities in Taiwan. Scientometrics, 102(1), 97-112. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11192-014-1420-6

Christensen, G., Steinmetz, A., Alcorn, B., Bennett, A., Woods, D., & Emanuel, E.J. (2013). The MOOC phenomenon: Who takes massive open online courses and why? (University of Pennsylvania, November 6). SSRN-id2350964. http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2350964

Clow, D. (2013). MOOC and the funnel of participation. In: Third Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge (LAK 2013), Leuven, Belgium, April 8-12. Disponible online en:        http://oro.open.ac.uk/36657/1/DougClow-LAK13-revised-submitted.pdf http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2460296.2460332

Conferencia de Rectores de las Universidades Españolas (CRUE). (2015). Informe MOOC y Criterios de Calidad. Versión 1.0. Toledo: Jornadas CRUE-TIC. Disponible online en: http://www.crue.org/TIC/Documents/InformeMOOC_CRUETIC_ver1%200.pdf

Cybermetrics Lab (2014). Webometrics ranking of world universities. Available online in: http://www.webometrics.info

Daniel, J. (2012). Making sense of MOOCs: Musings in a maze of myth, paradox and possibility. Journal of Interactive Media in Education, 3. Available online in: http://jime.open.ac.uk/article/view/259 http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/2012-18

Daniel, J., Vázquez, E., & Gisbert, M. (2015). El futuro de los MOOC: ¿Aprendizaje adaptativo o modelo de negocio?. Revista de Universidad y Sociedad del Conocimiento, 12, 64-74. http://dx.doi.org/10.7238/rusc.v12i1.2475

De Freitas, S.I., Morgan, J., & Gibson, D. (2015). Will MOOCs transform learning and teaching in higher education? Engagement and course retention in online learning provision. British Journal of Educational Technology, 46(3), 455-471. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjet.12268

Docampo, D. (2008). Rankings internacionales y calidad de los sistemas universitarios. Revista de Educación, número extraordinario, 149-176.

European Commission (2013). Opening up Education: Innovative teaching and learning for all through new Technologies and Open Educational Resources. Available online in: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:52013DC0654&from=EN

European University Association (EUA). (2015). Trends 2015: Learning and Teaching in European Universities, by Sursock, A. (Brussels, EUA). Available online in: http://www.eua.be/Libraries/publications-homepage-list/EUA_Trends_2015_web

European Parliament (2015). Internationalisation of Higher Education. Available online in: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2015/540370/IPOL_STU(2015)540370_EN.pdf

Gallego-Álvarez, I., Rodríguez, L., & García-Sánchez, I. (2011). Information disclosed online by Spanish universities: Content and explanatory factors. Online Information Review, 35(3), 360-385. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/14684521111151423

Garde-Sánchez, R., Rodríguez, M., & López, A. (2013). Divulgación online de información de responsabilidad social en las universidades españolas. Revista de Educación, número extraordinario, 177-209.

Gašević, D., Kovanović, V., Joksimović, S., & Siemens, G. (2014). Where is Research on Massive Open Online Courses Headed? A Data Analysis of the MOOC Research Initiative. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 15(5), 134-176. http://dx.doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v15i5.1954

Guzmán, A., del Moral, M., González, F., & Gil, H. (2013). Impacto de Twitter en la comunicación y promoción institucional de las universidades. Píxel-Bit. Revista de Medios y Educación, 43, 139-153. http://dx.doi.org/10.12795/pixelbit.2013.i43.10

Hollands, F.M., & Tirthali, D. (2014). Why Do Institutions Offer MOOCs?. Online Learning: Official Journal of the Online Learning Consortium, 18(3), 1-20.

Horstschräer, J. (2012). University rankings in action? The importance of rankings and an excellence competition for university choice of high-ability students. Economics of Education Review, 31, 1162‑1176. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.econedurev.2012.07.018

Iniesta, M.A., Sánchez, R., & Schlesinger, W. (2013). Investigating factors that influence on ICT usage in higher education: A descriptive analysis. International Review Public Nonprofit Marketing, 10, 163-174. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12208-013-0095-7

Jansen, D., Schuwer, R., Teixeira, A., & Aydin, H. (2015). Comparing MOOC adoption strategies in Europe: Results from the HOME project survey. International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 16(6), 116-136. http://dx.doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v16i6.2154

Jordan, K. (2014). Initial Trends in Enrolment and Completion of Massive Open Online Courses. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 15(1), 133-160.http://dx.doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v15i1.1651

Kirkup, G., & Kirkwood, A. (2005). Information and communications technologies (ICT) in higher education teaching—a tale of gradualism rather than revolution. Learning, Media and Technology, 30(2), 185-199. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17439880500093810

Liyanagunawardena, T.R., Adams, A. & Williams, S. (2013a). MOOC: A Systematic Study of the Published Literature 2008-2012. International review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 14(3), 202-227.

Liyanagunawardena, T.R., Adams, A., & Williams, S. (2013b). The Impact and Reach of MOOC: A Developing Countries’ Perspective. eLearning Papers No. 33. Available online in:  www.elearningpapers.eu

Luque-Martínez, T. (2013). La actividad investigadora de la universidad española en la primera década del siglo XXI: La importancia del tamaño de la universidad. Revista Española de Documentación Científica, 36(4): e026. http://dx.doi.org/10.3989/redc.2013.4.1046

Maringe, F. (2006). University and course choice. International Journal of Educational Management, 20(6), 466-479. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/09513540610683711

Ng'ambi, D., & Bozalek, V. (2015). Editorial: Massive open online courses (MOOCs): Disrupting teaching and learning practices in higher education. British Journal of Educational Technology, 46(3), 451-454. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjet.12281

OECD (2015). Fostering new forms of learning for the 21st century. En D. Orr, M. Rimini & D. van Damme (Eds.). Open Educational Resources: A Catalyst for Innovation. Paris: OECD Publishing. http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264247543-en

Oliver, M., Hernández-Leo, D., Daza, V., Martin, C., & Albó, L. (2014). MOOC en España: Panorama de los Cursos Masivos Abiertos en Línea en las universidades españolas. Cátedra Telefónica – UPF Social Innovation in Education. Barcelona: Universitat Pompeu Fabra.

Ong, B.S., & Grigoryan, A. (2015). MOOCs and Universities: Competitors or Partners?    International Journal of Information and Education Technology, 5(5), 373-376. http://dx.doi.org/10.7763/IJIET.2015.V5.533

Ospina-Delgado, J., & Zorio-Grima, A. (2016). Innovation at universities: A fuzzy-set approach for MOOC-intensiveness. Journal of Business Research, 69(4), 1325-1328. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2015.10.100

Pang, Y., Tong, W., & Na, W. (2014). MOOC Data from Providers. En Enterprise Systems Conference (ES), 2014 (2-3 Aug). IEEE Computer Society, 87-90. http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ES.2014.45

Raposo, M., Martínez, E., & Sarmiento, J. (2015). Un estudio sobre los componentes pedagógicos de los cursos online masivos. Comunicar, 44(22), 27-35. http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C44-2015-03

Rodriguez, O. (2012). MOOCs and the AI-Stanford like Courses: two successful and distinct course formats for massive open online courses. European Journal of Open, Distance, and E-Learning, 2012(II). Available online in: http://www.eurodl.org/?p=archives&year=2012&halfyear=2&abstract=516

Rodriguez, O. (2013). The Concept of Openness behind c and x-MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses). Open Praxis, 5(1), 67-73. http://dx.doi.org/10.5944/openpraxis.5.1.42

Sangrà, A., González Sanmamed, M., & Anderson, T. (2015). Metaanálisis de la investigación sobre MOOC en el período 2013-2014. Educación XXI, 18(2), 21-49. http://dx.doi.org/10.5944/educxx1.13463

SCOPEO (2013). Informe Nº2. MOOCs: Estado de la situación actual, posibilidades, retos y futuro. Salamanca: Universidad de Salamanca. Available online in:http://scopeo.usal.es/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/scopeoi002.pdf

Shrivastava, A., & Guiney, P. (2014). Technological developments and tertiary education delivery models. The arrival of MOOC. New Zealand: Ministry of Education, Tertiary Education Comission.

Schuwer, R., Gil-Jaurena, I., Aydin, C.H., Costello, E., Dalsgaard, C., Brown, M. et al. (2015). Opportunities and Threats of the MOOC Movement for Higher Education: The European Perspective. International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 16(6), 20-38. http://dx.doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v16i6.2153

Siemens, G. (2004). Connectivism. A Learning Theory for the Digital Age. Elearnspace, December, 12. Available online in: http://www.elearnspace.org/Articles/connectivism.htm

Sierra, J. (2012). Factors influencing a student’s decision to pursue a communications degree in Spain. Intangible Capital, 8(1), 43-60. http://dx.doi.org/10.3926/ic.277

Taylor, R., & Osorio, J. (2005). Economías de e-learning en la enseñanza superior: Estrategias de implantación. Revista de Universidad y Sociedad del Conocimiento, 2(1), 87-100.

UNESCO. (2009). A New Dynamic: Private Higher Education. World Conference on Higher Education. By Bjarnason, S., Cheng, K-M., Fielden, J., Lemaitre, M-J., Levy, D. y Varghese, N.V. Available online in:  http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0018/001831/183174e.pdf

UNESCO/COL. (2011). Guidelines for Open Educational Resources (OER) in Higher Education. Unesco and Commonwealth of Learning. Available online in: http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0021/002136/213605e.pdf

University of Maryland (2013). Call for proposals for MOOCs. Available online in: http://www.provost.umd.edu/announcements/Coursera_call_for_proposals.cfm

University of Illinois (2014). Call for proposals for MOOCs. Available online in: http://mooc.illinois.edu/faculty/

Vásquez, E., López, E., & Sarasola, J.L. (2013). La expansión del conocimiento en abierto: Los MOOC. Barcelona: Octaedro-ICE.

Waldrop, M. (2013). Campus 2.0 Massive open online courses are transforming higher education and providing fodder for scientific research. Nature, 495, 160-163. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/495160a

West Virginia University (2015). Call for proposals for MOOCs Round 2. Available online in: http://academicinnovation.wvu.edu/MOOC/CallForProposals.php

World Bank (2014). Available online in: http://datos.bancomundial.org/indicador/NY.GDP.PCAP.CD/countries

Yousef, A.M.F., Chatti, M.A., Wosnitza, M., & Schroeder, U. (2015). Análisis de clúster de perspectivas de participantes en MOOC. Universities and Knowledge Society Journal, 12(1), 74-91. http://dx.doi.org/10.7238/rusc.v12i1.2253

Yuan, L., & Powell, S. (2013). MOOCs and Open Education: Implications for Higher Education. eLearning Papers, In-depth, 33(2), 1-7. Available online in:http://www.openeducationeuropa.eu/sites/default/files/asset/In-depth_33_2_0.pdf






Versión en español

tulo: Cursos en línea masivos y abiertos en educación superior. Un análisis desde su oferta

Resumen

Objeto: Los MOOCs se han difundido como una práctica innovadora en cuya oferta participan diversos proveedores entre ellos las universidades. El propósito del estudio es analizar si algunos factores internos y estratégicos de las universidades como el prestigio, su carácter público o privado, la antigüedad, el tamaño (medido en número de profesores o número de estudiantes) y la región de origen, influyen en la oferta universitaria MOOC.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque: Con un enfoque cuantitativo y usando técnicas de análisis multivariante, se contrastan cinco hipótesis asociadas al perfil institucional de 151 universidades originarias de 29 países, con oferta de MOOCs a través de cuatro de las plataformas globales privadas más difundidas en la etapa de auge de los MOOCs (Udacity, Coursera, edX y MiríadaX).

Aportaciones y resultados: El trabajo pone de manifiesto, a través de dos modelos, algunas diferencias cuando el prestigio de la universidad es medido con el ranking de Shanghai (modelo 1) y cuando lo es con el ranking de Webometrics (modelo 2). En ambos modelos, el tipo de universidad (privada) y la región (Norteamérica) son factores que influyen de manera significativa en la oferta MOOC. También resultan ser factores significativos el tamaño y la edad, dependiendo del ranking. El prestigio es un factor significativo en la oferta sólo en el modelo 2.

Limitaciones: Por tratarse de un fenómeno con una tendencia creciente, los datos de la oferta cambian de manera constante, por lo cual los resultados se enmarcan a un período específico del tiempo.

Implicaciones prácticas: El estudio aporta nuevos elementos empíricos para desarrollar estudios a futuro que permitan analizar y comparar los cambios en la oferta universitaria de MOOCs.

Implicaciones sociales: El estudio aporta a la comprensión de factores que influyen en que las universidades participen de manera más o menos intensiva en una iniciativa que señala nuevas tendencias en la educación. Asimismo, sugiere aspectos relevantes para la política universitaria de innovación educativa ya que las universidades deben afrontar decisiones estratégicas en un entorno competitivo que afecta su filosofía institucional.

Originalidad / Valor añadido: Este trabajo constituye un aporte empírico a la literatura existente sobre la oferta MOOC, al analizar la relevancia del factor prestigio medido a través de dos rankings universitarios, el de Webometrics, cuyo énfasis es hacia la visibilidad en Internet y el de Shanghai, cuyo énfasis está en el impacto de la investigación científica.

Palabras clave: Cursos en línea masivos y abiertos, Educación superior, Plataformas MOOC, Universidades, Prestigio, Oferta MOOC

Códigos JEL: A22, I23

 

1. Introducción

La Universidad, como institución social llamada a responder a los desafíos de la modernización y la globalización, ha incorporado de múltiples formas las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC). Como consecuencia, se han generado nuevos escenarios educativos virtuales con importantes transformaciones que van desde la forma de acceder al conocimiento, hasta las estructuras mismas de las instituciones educativas (European Commission, 2013; UNESCO/COL, 2011).

Los efectos y tendencias de las TIC en la educación superior se analizan desde hace más de una década (Kirkup & Kirkwood, 2005; Alba Pastor, 2005). Taylor y Osorio (2005), pronosticaban para la presente década el afianzamiento de la formación universitaria norteamericana como producto de exportación al mundo basado en las TIC. Hoy la sentencia se hace evidente con los Cursos en Línea Masivos y Abiertos (MOOC, por sus siglas en inglés). De hecho, se considera que los avances tecnológicos en educación superior no han sido tan visibles hasta la llegada de estos cursos (EUA, 2015) cuyo auge, desde el 2012, ocupa gran parte del debate actual en el ámbito educativo y pedagógico (Ng'ambi & Bozalek, 2015; Sangrà, González & Anderson, 2015). Su importancia radica en la propuesta de una educación sin barreras para cualquier persona que disponga de conexión a Internet, gracias a su condición de apertura y gratuidad, aspectos que promueven otra de sus características principales, su acceso masivo.

Si bien se trata de un fenómeno nacido en la universidad norteamericana (Rodriguez, 2012; Waldrop, 2013), los MOOCs no forman parte de la oferta reglada de las universidades y son impartidos a través de plataformas proveedoras de educación virtual creadas, en su mayoría, como consorcios para tal fin (p.ej. Coursera, Udacity, edX, MiríadaX), en cuya oferta participan diversos tipos de entidades con y sin ánimo de lucro (Ong & Grigoryan, 2015; Pang, Tong & Na, 2014; Yuan & Powell, 2013). Algunos estudios (Daniel, Vásquez & Gisbert, 2015; Yuan & Powell, 2013) consideran la participación de las universidades en el fenómeno MOOC como resultado del proceso de convergencia tecno-mediática y como consecuencia de la masificación de la educación superior en el contexto de la homogenización cultural que conlleva la globalización. Otros consideran los MOOCs como una oportunidad para las universidades públicas, con menor presupuesto, y no como una amenaza como se creía inicialmente, señalando sus beneficios para llegar a grupos sociales como los retirados o empleados que desean mejorar su desempeño técnico, para quienes estos cursos serían un desafío intelectual (Ong & Grigoryan, 2015). También son vistos como una oportunidad para avanzar en el aprendizaje permanente (lifelong learning) (De Freitas, Morgan & Gibson, 2015), aspectos compartidos por organismos oficiales europeos, que los consideran como un agente de cambio en la educación superior (European Parliament, 2015; European Commission, 2013).

Dos características diferencian los MOOCs del ya reconocido e-Learning, su masividad y apertura (Atenas, 2015); este último más en el sentido de la gratuidad que en el sentido original de los recursos educativos abiertos (REA) cuyos principios básicos de apertura, reutilización y remezcla (OECD, 2015) han sido velado por el mensaje de gratuidad inicial al que luego los proveedores añaden cobros por servicios adicionales, tales como la acreditación y la certificación (Daniel et al., 2015; Atenas, 2015), aspecto que ha dado lugar a la crítica a asociar el auge de los MOOCs con razones de tipo económico y comercial.

La mayor parte de la investigación sobre MOOC se ha orientado más hacia los aspectos relacionados con su demanda y menos a la oferta (Ospina & Zorio, 2016; Gašević, Kovanović, Joksimović & Siemens, 2014). En general, se da por sentado que las instituciones educativas ofrecen este tipo de cursos principalmente para ampliar su alcance y visibilidad institucional, atrayendo más estudiantes, así como para construir y mantener su marca (Sangrà et al., 2015; Daniel et al., 2015). Estas razones han sido identificadas en estudios norteamericanos y recientemente se han publicado estudios basados en cuestionarios en Europa que permiten ampliar los referentes sobre la oferta y las perspectivas de desarrollo de los MOOCs. Según datos de la Asociación Europea de Universidades, los MOOCs representan una de las actividades con mayor potencial de crecimiento en las universidades europeas (EUA, 2015). Por su parte, la Conferencia de Rectores de las Universidades Españolas (CRUE, 2015) señala como razones de las universidades para ofrecer estos cursos, en primer lugar, la innovación en el aprendizaje y en segundo lugar, la visibilidad y la presencia de la docencia universitaria en la red.

Este panorama permite resaltar la oportunidad de esta investigación cuyo objetivo es analizar la oferta universitaria de MOOCs, a través de las cuatro primeras plataformas más reconocidas en su ámbito, para conocer las características de las universidades que están respondiendo a esta tendencia educativa. Se contrastan, en primer lugar, cinco hipótesis asociadas al prestigio, el tipo de universidad -pública o privada-, la antigüedad, el tamaño y la región de la universidad, y en segundo lugar, se realiza un análisis multivariante para identificar si algunos de estos factores característicos de las universidades influyen en la oferta de MOOCs. Así, este trabajo aporta nuevas evidencias de las relaciones empíricas entre variables asociadas al perfil de las universidades y su nivel de oferta MOOC, mostrando sobre todo, la relevancia del prestigio como factor estratégico.

Tras esta introducción, el siguiente apartado presenta una revisión de la literatura internacional sobre los MOOCs y se formulan las hipótesis del estudio. La tercera sección describe los datos obtenidos, las variables y la metodología utilizada. A continuación, en el cuarto apartado, se presenta el análisis de los resultados obtenidos, seguido por una sección final con las principales conclusiones derivadas del trabajo.

 

2. Antecedentes teóricos y formulación de hipótesis

El término MOOC es usado de manera genérica, para referirse a dos tipos de cursos con fundamentos pedagógicos diferentes (Sangrà et al., 2015; Clow, 2013). Los c-MOOC, basados en los principios pedagógicos del “conectivismo” propuesto por Siemens (2004) como teoría del aprendizaje para la era digital, subrayando el poder de las interacciones sociales para autogenerar conocimiento; y los del tipo x-MOOC, basados en contenidos y en la concepción tradicional de transmisión del conocimiento y con mayor difusión en las primeras y más grandes plataformas educativas proveedoras de MOOCs, como Coursera, Udacity, edX y MiríadaX (Atenas, 2015; Rodriguez, 2013), en las cuales se centra el presente trabajo.

Desde el punto de vista de la teoría de las innovaciones disruptivas de Bower y Christensen (1995), los MOOCs son descritos como una práctica innovadora que implica una disrupción educativa (Yuan & Powell, 2013; Anderson & McGreal, 2012) y más exactamente como una innovación disruptiva de mercado, al convertirse en un interesante producto que combina un desarrollo tecnológico con un nuevo mercado de negocio que promueve un tipo de formación más flexible y de bajo costo (Vásquez, López & Sarasola, 2013).

No obstante la novedad del tema, se observa un ascenso permanente en la literatura (Sangrà et al., 2015; Gašević et ál. 2014; Liyanagunawardena, Adams & Williams, 2013a), especialmente desde el punto de vista de la demanda. Christensen, Steinmetz, Alcorn, Bennett, Woods y Emanuel (2013) sostienen que la mayoría de los participantes en estos cursos son jóvenes con estudios superiores y empleados, provenientes de países desarrollados, que buscan, además de satisfacer su curiosidad, mejorar su perfil laboral. Yousef, Chatti, Wosnitza y Schroeder (2015) agrupan en ocho clústeres los motivos de los participantes en MOOC: aprendizaje mezclado, flexibilidad, contenido de alta calidad, diseño instruccional y metodologías de aprendizaje, aprendizaje permanente, aprendizaje en red, apertura y aprendizaje centrado en el estudiante.

Desde el punto de vista de la oferta, Hollands y Tirthali (2014), abordan la cuestión de ¿Por qué las instituciones ofrecen MOOCs? en un estudio cualitativo con 83 entrevistas a líderes de 29 instituciones estadounidenses, en el cual identifican seis objetivos principales: extender el alcance institucional y captar mayor número de estudiantes (tamaño), construir y mantener la marca (prestigio), mejorar su economía mediante la reducción de costos o el aumento de los ingresos, mejorar los resultados educativos, innovar en la enseñanza-aprendizaje y desarrollar investigación en procesos de enseñanza aprendizaje. Entre tanto, el estudio de Jansen, Schuwer, Teixeira y Aydin (2015), basado en encuestas online entre 67 instituciones de educación superior de 22 países europeos que ofrecen MOOC o que planean hacerlo, indica que el objetivo más importante, a diferencia de EEUU, es crear nuevas oportunidades de aprendizaje flexible. También señala que el número de universidades de Europa que ofrece MOOC o que planea hacerlo se ha incrementado del 58% en 2013 al 71.7% en 2014, mientras que en EEUU, según datos de Allen y Seaman (2015), pasó de un 14.3% a un 13.6%. Así, concluyen Jansen et al. (2015), que las universidades europeas parecen estar más implicadas en el fenómeno MOOC que las estadounidenses, al punto de convertirse en una tendencia principal en Europa.

En España, el estudio auspiciado por Telefónica, (Oliver, Hernández, Daza, Martin & Albó, 2014), con datos a diciembre de 2013, indica que el 35% de las universidades tiene al menos un MOOC y que el fenómeno involucra tanto a universidades con tradición en formación a distancia como a universidades de tradición presencial, reconociendo una mayor oferta en las públicas e identificando a España como líder de la oferta de MOOCs en Europa, aspecto también reconocido por la CRUE (2015).

A partir de estos referentes, el presente trabajo se centra en estudiar si algunos factores característicos de la institución (prestigio, tipo de universidad -pública o privada, antigüedad, tamaño y región de origen) explican el nivel de oferta universitaria de MOOCs.

2.1. Prestigio

En la actual dinámica de internacionalización de la educación superior, uno de los objetivos comunes más importantes entre las universidades es incrementar su reputación y prestigio, en lo cual juega un papel clave su posicionamiento en los rankings (European Parliament, 2015). De hecho, en un ambiente competitivo, la reputación y el prestigio institucional son uno de los factores que determinan, entre otras cosas, la elección de universidad y carrera por parte de los estudiantes (Sierra, 2012; Aguillo, Bar-Ilan, Levene & Ortega, 2010; Docampo, 2008); llegando incluso a confirmarse que dicho prestigio no provenga necesariamente de actividades propias de investigación (Horstschräer, 2012; Maringe, 2006).

Por lo anterior, el prestigio ha sido analizado como factor estratégico de la universidad (Hollands & Tirthali, 2014; Jordan, 2014; Ospina & Zorio, 2016), siendo un término usado con frecuencia por las plataformas MOOC al declarar que su oferta proviene de las universidades más prestigiosas del mundo (Ong & Grigoryan, 2015; Schuwer et al., 2015; Pang et al., 2014; Yuan & Powell, 2013). También es uno de los objetivos que persiguen los participantes en MOOC, según el estudio de Yousef et al. (2015). Por lo tanto, puede plantearse que las universidades de mayor prestigio lideran la oferta con un mayor número de MOOCs, haciendo ostensible su innovación educativa. Así, la primera hipótesis que se propone es:

H1: Existe una relación significativa y positiva entre el prestigio de una universidad y su oferta de MOOCs.

 

2.2. Carácter público o privado

Si bien es cierto que se trata de un fenómeno en el que participan instituciones públicas y privadas, la literatura existente permite asociarlo mayoritariamente al interés de actores privados con importantes cuantías de inversión (Yuan & Powell, 2013; Belleflamme & Jacqmin, 2014), en gran medida por la tendencia de crecimiento de la educación privada (UNESCO, 2009). Hollands y Tirthali (2014) y Allen y Seaman (2014), con referencia a instituciones estadounidenses, señalan diferencias estadísticas entre el tipo de instituciones que ofrecen MOOC, predominando las privadas. De igual modo, Shrivastava y Guiney (2014) ponen de relieve en su estudio una mayor tendencia hacia estos cursos en las universidades privadas, debido a una mayor resistencia en las públicas. No siendo así en España donde hay mayor oferta en las universidades públicas, que han contado con el impulso de una de las plataformas más utilizadas como “MiríadaX”, fruto de alianzas privadas (Oliver et al., 2014). Para validar esta tendencia, se plantea la siguiente hipótesis:

H2: La universidad de tipo privada evidencia, con significatividad estadística, una mayor oferta de MOOCs que la universidad pública.

 

2.3. Antigüedad

De otra parte, interesa estudiar si el factor antigüedad genera diferencias significativas en la oferta universitaria de MOOCs. Este factor ha sido analizado en diversos estudios sobre educación superior (Luque-Martínez, 2013; Guzmán, del Moral, González & Gil, 2013; Gallego-Álvarez, Rodríguez & García-Sánchez, 2011), hallando por ejemplo, una relación significativa y negativa entre la edad de la universidad y el uso de TIC (Iniesta, Sánchez & Schlesinger, 2013). Considerando estos antecedentes, se admite que las universidades más antiguas, que han construido su know-how en muchos años, tienden a preservar más que las jóvenes su imagen corporativa (Gallego-Álvarez et al., 2011) y en consecuencia, podrían ser menos entusiastas frente a modelos que, respecto de su efectividad, aún se encuentran en estado incipiente como los MOOCs. Por lo anterior, se formula la siguiente hipótesis:

H3: Existe una relación significativa y negativa entre la antigüedad de la universidad y su oferta de MOOCs.

 

2.4. Tamaño

El tamaño de la institución, medido en número de estudiantes o de profesores, es otro de los factores característicos analizados en educación superior (UNESCO, 2009; Luque-Martínez, 2013; Guzmán et al., 2013; Gallego-Álvarez et al., 2011). Según el estudio de Allen y Seaman (2014), las instituciones estadounidenses de mayor tamaño -con más de 15 mil estudiantes- son las más proclives a la oferta MOOC. Otros estudios (Hollands & Tirthali, 2014; SCOPEO, 2013), indican que la iniciativa responde en muchos casos a aliviar la presión por alta demanda -cursos "cuello de botella”, factor asociado al tamaño, en número de estudiantes. De acuerdo con Ospina y Zorio (2016), un bajo tamaño, medido en número de profesores, es la única condición presente en una de las dos soluciones que llevan a un perfil universitario no-intensivo en MOOC. Estos antecedentes permiten plantear que son las universidades de mayor tamaño las que disponen de un mayor nivel de recursos para hacer frente a este tipo de innovación, por lo cual se propone la siguiente hipótesis:

H4: Existe una relación significativa y positiva entre el tamaño de la universidad y su oferta de MOOCs.

 

2.5. Región

El estudio de Aguillo, Ortega y Fernández (2008) anima a pensar en la importancia de este factor al sugerir la tendencia de las universidades norteamericanas a hacer un mejor y más profundo uso de la web. Por otro lado, aunque se reconoce que el primer MOOC se lanzó en Canadá en 2008 y la literatura señala la preponderancia del fenómeno en los EEUU (Schuwer et al., 2015; Yousef et al., 2015; Shrivastava & Guiney, 2014; Liyanagunawardena et al., 2013a; SCOPEO, 2013), nuevos participantes de otras regiones se incorporan a la oferta, señalando incluso una mayor tendencia creciente del fenómeno en Europa (Jansen et al., 2015). En consecuencia, interesa validar este aspecto planteando la siguiente hipótesis:

H5: Con una relación significativa y positiva, la universidad Norteamericana ostenta una mayor oferta de MOOCs que las del resto del mundo.

 

3. Diseño del estudio: Metodología, datos y variables

La metodología consta, en primer lugar, de un análisis estadístico descriptivo para lograr una primera aproximación a las variables del estudio, seguido de un análisis bivariado que permite explorar la importancia de cada una de las variables disponibles en relación con la oferta MOOC. Posteriormente, un análisis de regresión múltiple permite corroborar cuáles de las variables incluidas en el modelo tienen algún grado de incidencia en el nivel de oferta MOOC.

 

3.1. Muestra

Son varias las universidades que ofrecen MOOC a través de sus propias plataformas virtuales para e-Learning o los ya existentes Learning Management System (LMS) como Blackboard o Moodle (Ong & Gregorian, 2015), pero a objeto de este estudio, interesan aquellas que han decidido ofrecerlos a través de cuatro plataformas externas. La muestra incluye 151 universidades, originarias de 29 países agrupados en cuatro grandes regiones, cuya oferta total corresponde a 904 cursos (ver Tabla 1). Las universidades corresponden a aquellas que a junio 30 de 2014 ofrecían al menos un MOOC en alguna de las primeras plataformas globales creadas por iniciativas privadas, y de mayor visibilidad y difusión en la etapa de auge del movimiento MOOC: Udacity, Coursera, edX, y MiríadaX (Sangrà et al., 2015; Jordan, 2014; Clow, 2013; Anderson & McGreal, 2012; Daniel, 2012). Se descartaron los MOOCs ofrecidos por otro tipo de proveedores no universitarios (Raposo, Martínez & Sarmiento, 2015).

 

Región

Norte- américa

Centro y Suramérica

Europa

Asia y Oceanía

Total

 

Países

Canadá EE.UU.

Argentina Colombia México Perú Puerto-Rico R- Dominicana

Alemania Bélgica Dinamarca España Francia Holanda Reino-U. Italia Rusia Suecia Suiza

Australia China Corea-sur Hong-Kong India Israel Japón Singapur Taiwán Turquía

Coursera

Univ.

42

2

25

14

83

MOOC

345

12

97

55

509

Países

2

1

10

9

22

edX

Univ.

16

0

8

10

34

MOOC

146

0

31

46

223

Países

2

0

6

6

14

Udacity

Univ.

2

0

0

0

2

MOOC

21

0

0

0

21

Países

1

0

0

0

1

Miríada X

 

Univ.

0

10

22

0

32

MOOC

0

16

135

0

151

Países

0

5

1

0

6

Total

 

Univ.

60

12

55

24

151

MOOC

512

28

263

101

904

Países

2

6

11

10

29

Tabla 1. Descripción de la muestra

 

3.2. Magnitudes y variables

Para medir el prestigio (H1), se han considerado, como proxys, dos rankings de amplio reconocimiento mundial pero con diferencias metodológicas sustanciales: Shanghai, (ARWU, 2014) cuya clasificación privilegia la actividad de investigación (Aguillo et al., 2010; Aguillo et al., 2008; Docampo, 2008) y Webometrics, (Cybermetrics Lab, 2014) que clasifica a las universidades en función de su visibilidad en Internet (Chen, Tang, Wang & Hsiang, 2015; Garde-Sánchez, Rodríguez & López, 2013; Aguillo et al., 2008). Ospina y Zorio (2016), mediante un enfoque cualitativo (fsQCA), ponen en evidencia que la ausencia del prestigio, medido a través del ranking Webometrics, es una condición suficiente que lleva a un perfil universitario no-intensivo en MOOC.. En el presente estudio se ha querido incorporar, además, el ranking de Shanghai para comprobar si al igual que Webometrics, está relacionada con la oferta MOOC.

Así, la variable SHANGHAI toma el valor 0 cuando la universidad no está presente en el ranking y el valor 1 si está. La variable WEBOMETRICS se ha planteado en cuatro intervalos que ubican a cada universidad según su clasificación en el ranking, siendo 1 cuando la universidad ocupa uno de los puestos más alejados (por encima de mil) y 4 cuando ocupa alguno de los mejores (los primeros cien puestos). Para H2, La variable TIPO toma el valor 0 cuando la universidad es pública y el valor 1 cuando es privada. La hipótesis referente a la antigüedad de la universidad, H3, es medida por la variable LNEDAD, que constituye el logaritmo neperiano de la edad en años de la institución desde su fundación. Para medir el tamaño de la universidad, H4, de acuerdo con estudios previos (Allen & Seaman 2014; Guzmán et al., 2013; Gallego-Álvarez et al., 2011) se han utilizado dos variables, LNFACULTY y LNESTUD, que representan el logaritmo neperiano del número de profesores vinculados y del número de estudiantes matriculados en la universidad, respectivamente; el análisis bivariado permitirá elegir, entre estas dos, la variable que mayor nivel de relación y significatividad alcance con la dependiente. La variable REGION, H5, agrupa el país de origen de cada universidad (Guzmán et al., 2013) en cuatro grandes regiones, Norteamérica, Centro y Sur América, Europa y Asia, y Oceanía.

De otra parte, la literatura existente (Ospina & Zorio, 2016; Daniel et al., 2015; Bartolomé & Steffens, 2015; Hollands & Tirthali, 2014; Liyanagunawardena, Adams & Williams, 2013b; SCOPEO, 2013) ofrece elementos de referencia para considerar en el estudio, como variables de control, dos factores externos que pueden afectar la oferta de MOOCs, relacionados con el país de origen de las universidades: el Producto Interno Bruto (PIB) per cápita y el nivel de penetración de Internet, cuyo datos fueron tomados de los indicadores de desarrollo mundial: la sociedad de la información (World Bank, 2014). Así, la variable PIB toma el valor 0 cuando el PIB per cápita del país de la universidad es menor al de la media del conjunto de los 29 países implicados en la muestra, en este caso, US$50.000, y el valor 1 cuando es mayor. La variable INTERNET toma el valor 0 cuando la penetración de Internet (% de la población con acceso) en el país de la universidad es menor a la media del conjunto de países de la muestra, en este caso, al 70%, y el valor 1 cuando es mayor.

Para analizar la relación de la oferta MOOC en función de las variables descritas, se plantean dos modelos de regresión múltiple,

  • incorporando la variable SHANGHAI como medida del prestigio más orientado al impacto de la producción científica; y

  • incorporando a cambio, la variable WEBOMETRICS, cuya orientación principal es hacia el impacto general de la universidad en la Web.

En ambos se ha considerado solo una de las variables relacionadas con el tamaño:

 

MOOCi = β0  + β1 (SHANGHAI) + β2 (TYPE) + β3 (LNAGE) + β4 (LNFACULTY) + β5 (REGION) + β6 (GDP) + β7 (INTERNET)  + ε i

(1)

 

MOOCi = β0  + β1 (WEBOMETRICS) + β2 (TYPE) + β3 (LNAGE) + β4 (LNFACULTY) + β5 (REGION) + β6 (GDP) + β7 (INTERNET)  + ε i

(2)

 

donde MOOC es la variable dependiente que representa el número de MOOCs ofrecido por la Universidad; “i” representa a cada universidad incluida en la muestra; β0 es el parámetro del término constante; mientras que cada uno de los coeficientes de las variables se denota con β1,… β7. El término de error, ε, capta los factores no observados en el modelo. Para el tratamiento estadístico de los datos se utilizó el programa Stata v.12.

 

4. Análisis de resultados

A Continuación se presenta el análisis de la estadística descriptiva, seguido del análisis bivariado para proseguir finalmente con el análisis de regresión múltiple.

 

4.1 Análisis descriptivo

En las tablas 2 y 3 se presentan los estadísticos descriptivos de todas las variables obtenidas. Un primer aspecto relevante en la Tabla 2 es la elevada dispersión en la variable dependiente MOOC (D.E=6,3), lo cual se debe a la presencia de muchas universidades con pocos cursos, el valor mínimo 1 corresponde a 30 universidades (20%) que a la fecha del estudio tenían solo un MOOC (menor oferta), y muy pocas con alta oferta, el valor máximo de 32 cursos (mayor oferta) solo lo tiene una universidad (0,7%). Entre las de menor oferta, el 70% son públicas, el 47% europeas y el 20% norteamericanas; la universidad con máxima oferta es norteamericana y de tipo privada. En el percentil 25, con dos MOOC, hay 47 universidades (30%) y en el percentil 50, con 4, hay 90 universidades (58%), lo cual evidencia una distancia importante entre las universidades con menor y mayor oferta.

 

 

Variable/(Hipótesis)

Media

D.E.

Min.

p.25

p. 50

p. 75

Max.

MOOC

5.99

6.326

1

2

4

7

32

LNEDAD (H3)

4.67

0.924

2.398

3.97

4.859

5.198

6.679

EDAD*

156.6

142.9

11

53

129

181

796

LNFACULTY (H4)

7.57

1.007

4.682

6.908

7.727

8.266

10.535

FACULTY*

3,123.8

4,346.4

108

1,000

2,269

3,888

37,610

LNESTUD (H4)

9.78

1.075

5.112

9.236

9.965

10.435

13.038

ESTUD*

30,406.5

49,833.4

166

10,264

21,260

34,046

459,550

* Valores originales de la variable antes de su transformación logarítmica

Tabla 2. Estadísticos descriptivos de variables continuas

 

La media de antigüedad de las universidades es de 156 años y el 81% del total tiene menos de 200 años y solo un 10% tiene entre 300 y 600 años, ocupando los valores mínimo y máximo dos universidades europeas, concretamente españolas; de las norteamericanas (60), el 57% están por debajo de la media, siendo la más joven de 49 años y la más antigua de 378 años.

Respecto del tamaño, el valor mínimo tanto en profesores (108) como en estudiantes (166) lo ocupa una misma universidad privada norteamericana, mientras que el valor máximo de profesores (37,610) lo tiene una universidad pública de Centroamérica y el máximo de estudiantes (459,550) una universidad pública norteamericana.

 

 

Variable/(Hipótesis)

Valores

Frecuencia Universidades

%

Frecuencia MOOC

%

SHANGHAI

(H1)

0: No está

51

33.8

204

22.6

1: Sí está

100

66.2

700

77.4

Total

151

100.0

904

100.0

WEBOMETRICS

(H1)

1 (>1001)

28

18.6

76

8.4

2 (501-1000)

15

9.9

78

8.6

3 (101-500)

45

29.8

203

22.5

4 (1-100)

63

41.7

547

60.5

Total

151

100.0

904

100.0

TIPO

(H2)

0: Pública

105

69.5

566

62.6

1: Privada

46

30.5

338

37.4

Total

151

100.0

904

100.0

REGIÓN

(H5)

1 Norteamérica

60

39.8

512

56.6

2 Centro y Suram.

12

7.9

28

3.1

3 Europa

55

36.4

263

29.1

4 Asia y Oceanía

24

15.9

101

11.2

Total

151

100.0

904

100.0

Variables de control

PIB

 

0: <USD $50,000

64

42.4

291

32.2

1: >USD $50,000

87

57.6

613

67.8

Total

151

100.0

904

100.0

INTERNET

0: <70%

24

15.9

91

10.1

1: >70%

127

84.1

813

89.9

Total

151

100.0

904

100.0

Tabla 3. Frecuencias de variables categóricas

 

En cuanto al prestigio, el 66.2% de las universidades están en el ranking de Shanghai y aportan la mayor parte de la oferta MOOC (77.4%); asimismo, el 71.5% de las universidades se encuentra en los primeros 500 puestos del ranking Webometrics (categorías 3 y 4 de la variable), abarcando el 83% de los cursos.

La mayoría de las universidades (69.5%) son públicas y aportan el 62.6% de la oferta, sin embargo, de éstas, el 71% tienen una oferta inferior a la media, es decir, menos de seis cursos.

Respecto de la región geográfica, el 39.8% de las universidades son de Norteamérica y participan con el 56.6% de la oferta; a Europa pertenece el 36.4% y ofrece el 29% de los cursos; el 15.9% pertenece a las regiones de Asia y Oceanía con el 11% de los MOOCs; y la región Centro y Suramérica aparece con el 7.9% de las universidades y el 3% de la oferta.

De otra parte, el 57% de las universidades analizadas que participan con una oferta del 68% de los MOOCs, pertenece a países cuyo PIB per-cápita es mayor a US$50,000, en tanto que el 85% de las universidades, que representan el 90% de la oferta de MOOCs, proviene de países cuya penetración de Internet es mayor al 70%.

 

4.2 Análisis bivariado

La Tabla 4 permite observar las correlaciones entre las variables continuas independientes y la variable que recoge la oferta de MOOCs. Aunque los coeficientes de correlación de las dos variables de tamaño (LNFACULTY y LNESTUD) no son altos, excepto entre ellas dos, presentan con la variable dependiente un nivel de significatividad del 5%. Este primer análisis sugiere que la edad de la universidad no tendría relación con la oferta MOOC, sin embargo, considerando el planteamiento de nuestra hipótesis, H3, conviene no descartarla para el siguiente análisis.

 

 

MOOC

LNEDAD

LNFACULTY

LNESTUD

MOOC

1

 

 

 

LNEDAD

0.169

1

 

 

LNFACULTY

0.251*

0.366*

1

 

LNESTUD

0.203*

0.285**

0.710**

1

(**) p<0.01 (*) p<0.05 (Coeficiente de correlación de Spearman)

Tabla 4. Correlaciones entre variables continuas

 

Las pruebas de contraste para las variables categóricas, reflejadas en la Tabla 5, arrojaron para todas, excepto TIPO, una alta significatividad estadística (1% y 5%) incluyendo las variables de control, lo cual sugiere la importancia de estas variables en el análisis del nivel de oferta universitaria MOOC.

 

Variable

Test de Kruskal-Wallis

Chi-cuadrado

Test de Mann-Whitney

Z

Sig. asintót. (bilateral)

WEBOMETRICS

28.072

 

0.000**

REGIÓN

23.225

 

0.000**

SHANGHAI

 

-3.284

0.001**

TIPO

 

-0.424

n.s.

PIB

 

-3.012

0.003**

INTERNET

 

-2.360

0.018**

Variable de contraste: MOOC.  n.s. no significativo

(**) p<0.01 (*) p<0.05

Tabla 5. Pruebas de contraste para variables categóricas

 

4.3 Análisis multivariante

Con el fin de evitar la auto-correlación entre las variables referentes al tamaño, se excluyó del análisis de regresión la variable LNESTUD que presentó menor correlación con la variable dependiente. Se confirma con el factor de inflación de varianza en los dos modelos inferior a 10 (VIF=2.44 y 2.41) la ausencia de problemas de multicolinealidad. Para la variable REGION, se muestran los resultados en función del último nivel de su categoría, esto es, la región de Asia y Oceanía. Ambos modelos (Tabla 6), obtuvieron significatividad global (Estadístico F robusto a la heteroscedasticidad=0.000) y un poder predictivo moderado, siendo más bajo en el modelo (1) estimado con la variable SHANGHAI (R2=0.192) que en el estimado con WEBOMETRICS (R2=0.267); y aunque no se hace evidente en la tabla, la inclusión de las variables de control reflejó en ambos modelos mejores resultados en términos de significatividad.

 

Variables independientes

Modelo (1)

Modelo (2) 

Coef.

t

p-valor

Coef.

t

p-valor

SHANGHAI

2.1171

1.44

 0.153

 

 

 

WEBOMETRICS

 

2.6325

4.51

0.000***

TIPO

3.0657

1.85

0.067*

4.2499

2.48

0.014**

LNEDAD

-0.5235

-0.84

0.404

-1.0215

-1.79

0.076*

LNFACULTY

1.4419

2.40

0.018**

0.7985

1.48

0.140

REGIÓN (Ref: Asia y Oceanía)

  Norteamérica

4.6443

3.15

0.002***

4.4570

3.48

0.001***

  Europa

1.9554

1.41

0.162

2.8730

2.37

0.019**

  Centro y Suram.

-2.4824

-1.32

0.188

-0.8908

-0.57

0.569

Variables de control

 

PIB

-1.5203

-1.30

0.197

-1.8341

-1.79

0.076*

INTERNET

-0.3409

-0.20

0.839

-0.5033

-0.34

0.738

Observaciones

151

151

F-Estadístico   

4.05

4.95

Probabilidad

0.000

0.000

R cuadradp

0.192

0.267

(***) p<0.01 (**) p<0.05 (*) p<0.10 

Tabla 6. Regresión múltiple para factores que influencian la oferta MOOC

 

Los resultados de la regresión para el modelo (1), en presencia de la variable SHANGHAI, indica que las variables que influyen en la oferta MOOC son, TIPO (p<0.10), cuyo coeficiente señala una ventaja de tres cursos en la universidad de tipo privada frente a la universidad pública; LNFACULTY (p<0.05), señalando que ante un aumento en esta variable se produce un aumento de una unidad en el nivel de oferta; y REGION, concretamente Norteamérica con p-valor<0.01.

En cuanto al modelo (2), que utiliza la variable WEBOMETRICS para medir el prestigio, indica que las variables que influyen en la oferta MOOC son, WEBOMETRICS (p<0.01), en la cual se observa que al mejorar su puesto en el ranking, la universidad intensifica su oferta en 2 cursos; la variable TIPO (p<0.05), reflejando mayor nivel de significatividad y un mayor coeficiente que en el modelo (1) pero señalando igual la influencia de la universidad privada frente a la pública en la oferta MOOC; aparece aquí LNEDAD, indicando una relación significativa (p<0.10) y negativa entre la antigüedad de las universidades y la oferta MOOC; y la variable REGION, que además de Norteamérica (p<0.01) como en el modelo (1), resulta significativa Europa con p-valor<0.05, lo cual señala que las universidades de Norteamérica presentan una ventaja de 4 cursos frente a la región de Asia y Oceanía, mientras que al ser una universidad de Europa, la diferencia positiva es de 2 cursos frente a la región de referencia.

En ambos modelos, las variables comunes que revelan una influencia positiva y significativa con la oferta MOOC son TIPO y REGIÓN (Norteamérica), lo cual sugiere aceptar H2 y H5. La variable LNFACULTY revela influencia sólo en el modelo (1), con lo cual podría aceptarse H4 de manera parcial. También por los resultados del modelo (2) podría aceptarse de manera parcial, las hipótesis relacionadas con el prestigio, H1, y con la edad, H3. En términos generales, el modelo (2) arroja mejores resultados para explicar la oferta MOOC de las universidades.

 

5. Conclusiones

La literatura analizada permite observar un amplio panorama que refleja entre los asuntos más importantes, la preocupación de los investigadores por la forma en que las universidades deben responder a los retos que exigen nuevos modelos educativos. Los MOOCs constituyen un nuevo escenario de educación virtual que hace parte fundamental del debate académico acerca del presente y futuro de la Universidad; y aunque, lejos de ser la solución a las debilidades y barreras del sistema educativo, presentan importantes desafíos a las comunidades educativas para repensar, en todas las disciplinas del conocimiento, los procesos de enseñanza-aprendizaje en el contexto de una sociedad en permanente cambio y tensión por dinámicas globalizantes y mediáticas.

Este trabajo aporta evidencia empírica de las relaciones entre variables asociadas al perfil institucional de universidades de distintas regiones y su nivel de oferta de cursos masivos y abiertos, a través de las cuatro plataformas globales más difundidas en la etapa de auge de los MOOCs. Se contrastaron cinco hipótesis, una asociada a un factor estratégico como es el prestigio de la universidad y cuatro asociadas a factores internos como el carácter público o privado de la universidad, el tamaño, la antigüedad y la región geográfica. Dos factores externos fueron considerados en el análisis a modo de variables de control, el PIB per-cápita y la penetración de Internet en el país de origen de la universidad. Dada la importancia del factor estratégico «prestigio» para el estudio, se realizó la estimación en dos modelos, uno utilizando la variable SHANGHAI y el otro utilizando la variable WEBOMETRICS.

Los resultados obtenidos en la regresión para ambos modelos sugieren datos interesantes para interpretar el nivel de la oferta MOOC en relación con las variables de ranking que miden el prestigio de la universidad. Cuando el prestigio es medido por el ranking de Shanghai, no resulta significativa esta variable para explicar el nivel de oferta MOOC, a pesar de que los resultados descriptivos reflejan que la mayoría de las universidades están presentes en dicho ranking; mientras que sí resulta ser el prestigio una variable influyente de manera significativa cuando se mide con el ranking de Webometrics, acorde con los resultados de Ospina y Zorio (2016).

A la vista de los resultados, se debe tener en cuenta que el ranking de Webometrics se basa principalmente en el factor de impacto web de las universidades, es decir, su visibilidad, y no tanto en el impacto de su actividad científica como sí sucede con el ranking de Shanghai (Aguillo, et al., 2010; Aguillo, et al., 2008; Docampo, 2008); de modo que es interesante considerar que aquellas universidades que han ganado su prestigio no tanto con la actividad de investigación como fortaleciendo la visibilidad de todas sus misiones en la web, sean las que lideran la oferta de MOOCs, aunque, como afirma Daniel (2012), no necesariamente sean líderes en la docencia online. Ello podría ser indicador de una tendencia en las universidades, no precisamente intensivas en investigación, a sobresalir mediante la oferta MOOC, como las más innovadoras, aspecto que va en línea con los hallazgos de Ospina y Zorio (2016) y Hollands y Tirthali (2014).

El estudio también pone de manifiesto que son las universidades privadas las que mayor peso significativo tienen en la oferta MOOC, acorde con los estudios de Hollands y Tirthali (2014) y Allen y Seaman (2014) relativos a Norteamérica. La muestra analizada está conformada mayoritariamente por universidades públicas (70%), no obstante, son las privadas las que participan con mayor intensidad de la oferta MOOC, en línea con Shrivastava y Guiney (2014) quien plantea una mayor resistencia a esta modalidad en las públicas, no sólo por los costes económicos, sino por los costes políticos que suelen ser mayores en las instituciones públicas que en las privadas (Gallego-Álvarez et al., 2011) y que se generan, especialmente en lo relacionado con el personal docente, al momento de decidir institucionalmente el modelo económico para este tipo de innovación (Hollands & Tirthali, 2014).

En cuanto a la región, a pesar de que cada vez más universidades europeas participan de la oferta (Jansen et al., 2015), y de hecho en la muestra analizada hay 55 europeas frente a 60 norteamericanas, se constata, con alta significatividad estadística, que las universidades con oferta más intensiva de MOOCs son las norteamericanas. Las referencias a la magnitud de las inversiones de capital de riesgo y las donaciones para apoyar esta innovación en EEUU por parte de organizaciones privadas tanto universidades como otros proveedores (Belleflamme & Jacqmin, 2014; Hollands & Tirthali, 2014) podrían respaldar este resultado, así como los de Aguillo et al. (2008) al encontrar en su análisis del ranking Web una brecha digital académica entre las universidades norteamericanas y sus equivalentes europeas. No obstante, los resultados obtenidos al medir el prestigio con la variable WEBOMETRICS reflejan también la importancia de Europa en esta tendencia, lo cual permite conjeturar que cada vez más esta región accede a los mecanismos dispuestos en la red para mejorar sus indicadores de visibilidad internacional.

De otra parte, los resultados del modelo (2) que mide el prestigio con la variable WEBOMETRICS, respaldan la hipótesis de que las universidades menos antiguas participan de manera más intensiva en la oferta de MOOCs, lo cual sugiere pensar en una actitud de mayor cautela en las universidades más antiguas frente a este tipo de innovación, participando con uno o pocos cursos, más acorde con el enfoque de “esperar y ver” que describen Hollands y Tirthali (2014).

Asimismo, los resultados al medir el prestigio con la variable SHANGHAI, respaldan la hipótesis relacionada con el tamaño, medida por el número de profesores de la universidad, sin embargo, en presencia de la variable WEBOMETRICS, el número de profesores no obtiene suficiente evidencia significativa para ser aceptada como un factor determinante en el nivel de oferta MOOC, lo cual podría tener su explicación en el hecho de que, tanto en Norteamérica (e.g. University of Maryland, 2013; University of Illinois, 2014; West Virginia University, 2015) como en Europa (Jansen et al., 2015; EUA, 2015), muchas de las apuestas por este fenómeno son promovidas con proyectos institucionales puntuales y no como una actividad propia de la misión de docencia que implique un incremento en su plantilla.

Los resultados obtenidos sugieren implicaciones en el ámbito educativo, ya que permiten un acercamiento empírico a la comprensión de factores que influyen en que las universidades decidan participar de manera más o menos intensiva en una iniciativa que de muchas formas está señalando nuevas tendencias en la concepción de la educación. Asimismo, señala aspectos relevantes para la política universitaria de innovación educativa ya que las universidades deben afrontar decisiones estratégicas en relación con su filosofía institucional, por ejemplo, la conveniencia de fortalecer su prestigio apostando por una mayor visibilidad internacional, participando en la tendencia de la masividad con plataformas tipo x-MOOC. En esta vía, muchos retos hay aún por asumir, donde el aspecto económico es uno de los más significativos. En relación con los costes, se plantean debates complejos en relación con el personal docente, como el que plantean Hollands y Tirthali (2014), que la primera edición del curso sea impartida por profesores vinculados y las re-ediciones estén a cargo de instructores no contratados o externalizados. Otros consideran una oportunidad el reconocimiento de los MOOCs en el Sistema Europeo de Acumulación y Transferencia de Créditos (ECTS) (Schuwer et al., 2015). Al margen de esta posibilidad, interesará conocer si la valoración de estos cursos por parte de los empleadores dependerá del prestigio de la plataforma o de la universidad que lo oferte (Rodriguez, 2012), y en cualquier caso, asumiendo la oportunidad de desarrollar una misión distintiva para la universidad o mejorar sus distintas misiones, como lo ha planteado Daniel (2012): «lo cual constituirá la verdadera revolución de los MOOC» (pp. 14).

Por último, se debe tener en cuenta que al tratarse de un fenómeno con una tendencia creciente, y que cada vez recibe más respaldo financiero de distintos organismos y actores, como en el reciente caso de Europa (Jansen et al., 2015), los datos cambian constantemente, lo cual podría ser visto como una limitación del presente trabajo. No obstante, convendría llevar a cabo estudios comparativos a futuro, incorporando nuevas variables que permitan además de reducir la parte no explicada por el modelo, analizar los cambios de la oferta MOOC en el tiempo y comprender cómo se insertan las universidades del mundo en esta tendencia global de apertura y masividad de la educación superior; ¿Responderán por igual las universidades ante las necesidades de innovación de la docencia en red o apostarán por algún tipo de especialización?

 

Agradecimientos

Las autoras agradecen el apoyo financiero de la Universidad de Valencia (UV-SFPIE_GER16-415408). También agradecen los comentarios y aportaciones recibidas en el II Workshop in Business, Economics and e-Learning (BEeL 2014), Barcelona, donde fue presentada una versión preliminar de este trabajo.

 

Referencias

Academic Ranking of World Universities – ARWU (2014). Disponible online en:  http://www.shanghairanking.com/es/ARWU2014.html

Aguillo, I., Bar-Ilan, J., Levene, M., & Ortega, J. (2010). Comparing university rankings. Scientometrics, 85, 243-256. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11192-010-0190-z

Aguillo, I., Ortega, J., & Fernández, M. (2008). Webometric Ranking of World Universities: Introduction, Methodology, and Future Developments. Higher Education in Europe, 33, 233-244. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03797720802254031

Alba Pastor, C. (2005). El profesorado y las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación en el proceso de convergencia al Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior. Revista de Educación, 337, 13-36.

Allen, E., & Seaman, J. (2014). Grade Change-Tracking Online Education in the United States. Babson Survey Research Group; Pearson; Sloan-C. Disponible online en:  http://onlinelearningconsortium.org/publications/survey/grade-change-2013

Allen, E., & Seaman, J. (2015). Grade Level: Tracking Online Education in the United States. Babson Survey Research Group; Pearson; Sloan-C. Disponible online en:  http://www.onlinelearningsurvey.com/reports/gradelevel.pdf

Anderson, T., & McGreal, R. (2012). Disruptive Pedagogies and Technologies in Universities. Educational Technology & Society, 15(4), 380-389.

Atenas, J. (2015). Modelo de democratización de los contenidos albergados en los MOOC. Universities and Knowledge Society Journal, 12(1), 3-14. http://dx.doi.org/10.7238/rusc.v12i1.2031

Bartolomé, A., & Steffens, K. (2015). ¿Son los MOOC una alternativa de aprendizaje?. Comunicar, 44, 91-99. http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C44-2015-10

Belleflamme, P., & Jacqmin, J. (2014). An Economic Appraisal of MOOC Platforms: Business Models and Impacts on Higher Education. SSRN-id2537270. http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2537270

Bower, J.L., & Christensen, C.M. (1995). Disruptive technologies: Catching the wave. Harvard Business Review, January-February, 43-53. Disponible online en:http://www.immagic.com/eLibrary/ARCHIVES/GENERAL/JOURNALS/H950130C.pdf

Chen, K.H., Tang, M.C., Wang, C.M., & Hsiang, J. (2015). Exploring alternative metrics of scholarly performance in the social sciences and humanities in Taiwan. Scientometrics, 102(1), 97-112. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11192-014-1420-6

Christensen, G., Steinmetz, A., Alcorn, B., Bennett, A., Woods, D., & Emanuel, E.J. (2013). The MOOC phenomenon: Who takes massive open online courses and why? (University of Pennsylvania, November 6). SSRN-id2350964. http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2350964

Clow, D. (2013). MOOC and the funnel of participation. In: Third Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge (LAK 2013), Leuven, Belgium, April 8-12. Disponible online en:http://oro.open.ac.uk/36657/1/DougClow-LAK13-revised-submitted.pdf http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2460296.2460332

Conferencia de Rectores de las Universidades Españolas (CRUE). (2015). Informe MOOC y Criterios de Calidad. Versión 1.0. Toledo: Jornadas CRUE-TIC. Disponible online en:http://www.crue.org/TIC/Documents/InformeMOOC_CRUETIC_ver1%200.pdf

Cybermetrics Lab (2014). Webometrics ranking of world universities. Disponible online en: http://www.webometrics.info

Daniel, J. (2012). Making sense of MOOCs: Musings in a maze of myth, paradox and possibility. Journal of Interactive Media in Education, 3. Disponible online en: http://jime.open.ac.uk/article/view/259 http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/2012-18

Daniel, J., Vázquez, E., & Gisbert, M. (2015). El futuro de los MOOC: ¿Aprendizaje adaptativo o modelo de negocio?. Revista de Universidad y Sociedad del Conocimiento, 12, 64-74. http://dx.doi.org/10.7238/rusc.v12i1.2475

De Freitas, S.I., Morgan, J., & Gibson, D. (2015). Will MOOCs transform learning and teaching in higher education? Engagement and course retention in online learning provision. British Journal of Educational Technology, 46(3), 455-471. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjet.12268

Docampo, D. (2008). Rankings internacionales y calidad de los sistemas universitarios. Revista de Educación, número extraordinario, 149-176.

European Commission (2013). Opening up Education: Innovative teaching and learning for all through new Technologies and Open Educational Resources. Disponible online en: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:52013DC0654&from=EN

European University Association (EUA). (2015). Trends 2015: Learning and Teaching in European Universities, by Sursock, A. (Brussels, EUA). Disponible online en: http://www.eua.be/Libraries/publications-homepage-list/EUA_Trends_2015_web

European Parliament (2015). Internationalisation of Higher Education. Disponible online en: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2015/540370/IPOL_STU(2015)540370_EN.pdf

Gallego-Álvarez, I., Rodríguez, L., & García-Sánchez, I. (2011). Information disclosed online by Spanish universities: Content and explanatory factors. Online Information Review, 35(3), 360-385. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/14684521111151423

Garde-Sánchez, R., Rodríguez, M., & López, A. (2013). Divulgación online de información de responsabilidad social en las universidades españolas. Revista de Educación, número extraordinario, 177-209.

Gašević, D., Kovanović, V., Joksimović, S., & Siemens, G. (2014). Where is Research on Massive Open Online Courses Headed? A Data Analysis of the MOOC Research Initiative. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 15(5), 134-176. http://dx.doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v15i5.1954

Guzmán, A., del Moral, M., González, F., & Gil, H. (2013). Impacto de Twitter en la comunicación y promoción institucional de las universidades. Píxel-Bit. Revista de Medios y Educación, 43, 139-153. http://dx.doi.org/10.12795/pixelbit.2013.i43.10

Hollands, F.M., & Tirthali, D. (2014). Why Do Institutions Offer MOOCs?. Online Learning: Official Journal of the Online Learning Consortium, 18(3), 1-20.

Horstschräer, J. (2012). University rankings in action? The importance of rankings and an excellence competition for university choice of high-ability students. Economics of Education Review, 31, 1162‑1176. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.econedurev.2012.07.018

Iniesta, M.A., Sánchez, R., & Schlesinger, W. (2013). Investigating factors that influence on ICT usage in higher education: A descriptive analysis. International Review Public Nonprofit Marketing, 10, 163-174. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12208-013-0095-7

Jansen, D., Schuwer, R., Teixeira, A., & Aydin, H. (2015). Comparing MOOC adoption strategies in Europe: Results from the HOME project survey. International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 16(6), 116-136. http://dx.doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v16i6.2154

Jordan, K. (2014). Initial Trends in Enrolment and Completion of Massive Open Online Courses. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 15(1), 133-160. http://dx.doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v15i1.1651

Kirkup, G., & Kirkwood, A. (2005). Information and communications technologies (ICT) in higher education teaching—a tale of gradualism rather than revolution. Learning, Media and Technology, 30(2), 185-199. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17439880500093810

Liyanagunawardena, T.R., Adams, A. & Williams, S. (2013a). MOOC: A Systematic Study of the Published Literature 2008-2012. International review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 14(3), 202-227.

Liyanagunawardena, T.R., Adams, A., & Williams, S. (2013b). The Impact and Reach of MOOC: A Developing Countries’ Perspective. eLearning Papers No. 33. Disponible online en:  www.elearningpapers.eu

Luque-Martínez, T. (2013). La actividad investigadora de la universidad española en la primera década del siglo XXI: La importancia del tamaño de la universidad. Revista Española de Documentación Científica, 36(4): e026. http://dx.doi.org/10.3989/redc.2013.4.1046

Maringe, F. (2006). University and course choice. International Journal of Educational Management, 20(6), 466-479. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/09513540610683711

Ng'ambi, D., & Bozalek, V. (2015). Editorial: Massive open online courses (MOOCs): Disrupting teaching and learning practices in higher education. British Journal of Educational Technology, 46(3), 451-454. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjet.12281

OECD (2015). Fostering new forms of learning for the 21st century. En D. Orr, M. Rimini & D. van Damme (Eds.). Open Educational Resources: A Catalyst for Innovation. Paris: OECD Publishing. http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264247543-en

Oliver, M., Hernández-Leo, D., Daza, V., Martin, C., & Albó, L. (2014). MOOC en España: Panorama de los Cursos Masivos Abiertos en Línea en las universidades españolas. Cátedra Telefónica – UPF Social Innovation in Education. Barcelona: Universitat Pompeu Fabra.

Ong, B.S., & Grigoryan, A. (2015). MOOCs and Universities: Competitors or Partners?    International Journal of Information and Education Technology, 5(5), 373-376. http://dx.doi.org/10.7763/IJIET.2015.V5.533

Ospina-Delgado, J., & Zorio-Grima, A. (2016). Innovation at universities: A fuzzy-set approach for MOOC-intensiveness. Journal of Business Research, 69(4), 1325-1328. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2015.10.100

Pang, Y., Tong, W., & Na, W. (2014). MOOC Data from Providers. En Enterprise Systems Conference (ES), 2014 (2-3 Aug). IEEE Computer Society, 87-90. http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ES.2014.45

Raposo, M., Martínez, E., & Sarmiento, J. (2015). Un estudio sobre los componentes pedagógicos de los cursos online masivos. Comunicar, 44(22), 27-35. http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C44-2015-03

Rodriguez, O. (2012). MOOCs and the AI-Stanford like Courses: two successful and distinct course formats for massive open online courses. European Journal of Open, Distance, and E-Learning, 2012(II). Disponible online en: http://www.eurodl.org/?p=archives&year=2012&halfyear=2&abstract=516

Rodriguez, O. (2013). The Concept of Openness behind c and x-MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses). Open Praxis, 5(1), 67-73. http://dx.doi.org/10.5944/openpraxis.5.1.42

Sangrà, A., González Sanmamed, M., & Anderson, T. (2015). Metaanálisis de la investigación sobre MOOC en el período 2013-2014. Educación XXI, 18(2), 21-49. http://dx.doi.org/10.5944/educxx1.13463

SCOPEO (2013). Informe Nº2. MOOCs: Estado de la situación actual, posibilidades, retos y futuro. Salamanca: Universidad de Salamanca. Disponible online en: http://scopeo.usal.es/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/scopeoi002.pdf

Shrivastava, A., & Guiney, P. (2014). Technological developments and tertiary education delivery models. The arrival of MOOC. New Zealand: Ministry of Education, Tertiary Education Comission.

Schuwer, R., Gil-Jaurena, I., Aydin, C.H., Costello, E., Dalsgaard, C., Brown, M. et al. (2015). Opportunities and Threats of the MOOC Movement for Higher Education: The European Perspective. International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 16(6), 20-38. http://dx.doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v16i6.2153

Siemens, G. (2004). Connectivism. A Learning Theory for the Digital Age. Elearnspace, December, 12. Disponible online en: http://www.elearnspace.org/Articles/connectivism.htm

Sierra, J. (2012). Factors influencing a student’s decision to pursue a communications degree in Spain. Intangible Capital, 8(1), 43-60. http://dx.doi.org/10.3926/ic.277

Taylor, R., & Osorio, J. (2005). Economías de e-learning en la enseñanza superior: Estrategias de implantación. Revista de Universidad y Sociedad del Conocimiento, 2(1), 87-100.

UNESCO. (2009). A New Dynamic: Private Higher Education. World Conference on Higher Education. By Bjarnason, S., Cheng, K-M., Fielden, J., Lemaitre, M-J., Levy, D. y Varghese, N.V. Disponible online en:  http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0018/001831/183174e.pdf

UNESCO/COL. (2011). Guidelines for Open Educational Resources (OER) in Higher Education. Unesco and Commonwealth of Learning. Disponible online en:  http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0021/002136/213605e.pdf

University of Maryland (2013). Call for proposals for MOOCs. Disponible online en: http://www.provost.umd.edu/announcements/Coursera_call_for_proposals.cfm

University of Illinois (2014). Call for proposals for MOOCs. Disponible online en: http://mooc.illinois.edu/faculty/

Vásquez, E., López, E., & Sarasola, J.L. (2013). La expansión del conocimiento en abierto: Los MOOC. Barcelona: Octaedro-ICE.

Waldrop, M. (2013). Campus 2.0 Massive open online courses are transforming higher education and providing fodder for scientific research. Nature, 495, 160-163. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/495160a

West Virginia University (2015). Call for proposals for MOOCs Round 2. Disponible online en: http://academicinnovation.wvu.edu/MOOC/CallForProposals.php

World Bank (2014). Disponible online en: http://datos.bancomundial.org/indicador/NY.GDP.PCAP.CD/countries

Yousef, A.M.F., Chatti, M.A., Wosnitza, M., & Schroeder, U. (2015). Análisis de clúster de perspectivas de participantes en MOOC. Universities and Knowledge Society Journal, 12(1), 74-91. http://dx.doi.org/10.7238/rusc.v12i1.2253

Yuan, L., & Powell, S. (2013). MOOCs and Open Education: Implications for Higher Education. eLearning Papers, In-depth, 33(2), 1-7. Disponible online en:http://www.openeducationeuropa.eu/sites/default/files/asset/In-depth_33_2_0.pdf




Licencia de Creative Commons 

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Intangible Capital, 2004-2019

Online ISSN: 1697-9818; Print ISSN: 2014-3214; DL: B-33375-2004

Publisher: OmniaScience