CSR and technology companies: A study on its implementation, integration and effects on the competitiveness of companies

CSR and technology companies: A study on its implementation, integration and effects on the competitiveness of companies

Juan Andres Bernal-Conesa1, Carmen de Nieves-Nieto1, Antonio-Juan Briones-Peñalver2

1Centro Universitario de la Defensa de San Javier. Departamento de Ciencias Económicas y Jurídicas. Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena(UPCT) (Spain)

2Facultad de Ciencias de la Empresa. Dpto. de Economía de la Empresa. Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena (UPCT) (Spain)

Received September, 2016

Accepted October, 2016

Versión en español

 

Abstract

Purpose: In this paper, a structural equation model is presented in order to explain the motivations of implementing Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in Spanish technology companies and its linkage with others standardized management systems before CSR implementation. It also examines whether CSR influences the competitiveness of these companies.

Design/methodology: The study was conducted in companies located in Spanish Science and Technology Parks. For this study, a survey was sent and structural equation model was used.

Findings: Model results show that there is a positive, direct and statistically significant relationship between the motivations, previous management systems, implementation of CSR and the real integration of CSR in the organization.

Research limitations/implications: Limitations are determined by the technique used for the proposed model: structural equations, which assume linearity of the relationship between latent variables.

Practical implications: Companies can use the results of this study as a foot hold to enhance the integration of CSR based on previous management systems and take advantage of synergies between them, since the integration of CSR has a direct relationship with the competitiveness of the company.

Originality/value: The link between the motivations of CSR, CSR actions and their integration in technology companies are reliably and empirically demonstrated.

Keywords: Corporate Social Responsibility, Motivation, Technology companies, Integration, Structure equation modelling

Jel Codes: M14

1. Introduction

If something characterizes the business environment in recent years has been the acute suffering economic crisis, which cannot be attributed merely to a change in the economic cycle but also to the absence of values and ethical principles in the functioning of organizations (Melé, Argandoña, Runde & Sánchez, 2011). Therefore, a solution for this crisis may be from social innovations (Goldsmith, 2010) and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is considered an innovation in business management and as such can reach their full strategic value and even there are organizations which believe that CSR protects against the negative effects of the economic crisis (Janssen, Sen & Bhattacharya, 2015). In this context, the classic study of CSR have expanded the scope of the economic crisis (Pérez & del Bosque, 2012) and their effective management can help organizations minimize the negative impacts of the recession.

Moreover, organizations are constantly adapting to economic changes with the intention to have a better chance of survival in the market. A key factor for this is innovation (Bernardo, 2014). Damanpour and Gopalakrishnan (2001) define it as "the adoption of an idea or a new behavior in the organization". CSR contributes to and encourages innovation in three ways:

  • innovation resulting from dialogue with various stakeholders both internal and external to the company,

  • identifying new business opportunities arising from social demands and environmental products and more efficient processes or new forms of business aimed at the socalled base of the pyramid, formed by people with less resources (Prahalad & Ramaswamy, 2004) and

  • creating better places and ways of working that encourage innovation and creativity, such as those based on greater employee participation and confidence in them (Benito Hernandez & Esteban Sanchez, 2012).

Therefore, companies should adopt formalized CSR practices and thus establish the procedures and tools that are aligned with their corporate strategy (Bocquet, Le Bas, Mothe & Poussing, 2013). So much so that there are studies that suggest that CSR has a significant positive contribution to national competitiveness and even levels of quality of life (Boulouta & Pitelis, 2014). In other words, it is expected that innovation will increase when the company is responsible and that increased innovation translates into greater competitive success, enhancing the effect itself already exercised CSR in the competitiveness of the company (Vázquez & Sánchez, 2013). As suggest Vilanova, Lozano and Arenas (2009) whether CSR is integrated into business processes generates innovative practices and therefore improved competitiveness and further this integration can be facilitated by standardized management processes previously implanted.

CSR has become an increasingly important factor for competitiveness perceived by enterprises (Turyakira, Venter & Smith, 2014). Competitiveness is a multidimensional concept that refers how create sustainable competitive advantage which can be used both nationally, and at the companies level (Vilanova et al., 2009). Hence, the effect of CSR on competitive success (obtaining positive results for the company in terms of market positioning and ranging beyond the financial sphere) (Vázquez & Sánchez, 2013) is higher in sectors with high competitiveness (such as the technology sector)and following a proactive (versus reactive) strategy (Marín Rubio & De Maya, 2012), in which CSR is a competitive advantage, while it is lower in uncompetitive sectors, where companies continue traditionally differentiating offering advantages brand, price, quality and distribution (Rives & Bañón, 2008).

Currently, there is a growing number of Spanish companies that believe they should contribute to sustainable development through the planning operations in order to promote economic growth and increasing its productivity and competitiveness while ensuring the protection of the environment and promoting social responsibility, and thus fulfilling the general interests (Prado-Lorenzo, Gallego-Álvarez, García-Sánchez & Rodriguez-Dominguez, 2008) of the society, since investment in CSR initiatives can be a source of competitive advantage (Apospori, Zografos & Magrizos, 2012) and a way to improve the economic performance of companies (Hur, Kim & Woo, 2014).

Being aware of these conditions, the aims of this article are:

  • investigating the motivations of technology companies for taking part in CSR initiatives and implement policies and activities within it - CSR practices that create innovations in processes (Benito Hernandez & Esteban Sanchez, 2012) - integrating them into the management system itself of any organization and

  • analyzing the enabling factors of implementation and integration of CSR within the organization and

  • the direct influence of the integration of CSR in the competitiveness of the technological company.

 

2. Review of the literature

Academically, CSR is often used as a comprehensive term to describe a variety of issues relating to the responsibilities of business (Hillenbrand, Money & Ghobadian, 2013). Waddock (2004), for example, defines CSR as defines CR as “the degree of (ir)responsibility manifested in a company’s strategies and operating practices as they impact stakeholders and the natural environment day-to-day”. However, there is no universally accepted definition of CSR (Dahlsrud, 2008), although it can be stated that CSR CSR is not only about strict compliance of existing legal obligations, but also voluntary integration in the governance and management, strategy, policies and procedures, social, labour-related and environmental concerns and respect for human rights arising from the relationship and transparent dialogue with its stakeholders, and taking responsibility for the consequences and impacts resulting from the actions of an organization (Mendoza, De Nieves & Briones, 2010).

On the other hand, much of the literature on CSR has focused on the impact of CSR on the level of enterprises competitiveness (Boulouta & Pitelis, 2014), for both large and small firms and in different sectors (Battaglia, Testa, Bianchi, Iraldo & Frey, 2014; Vidales & Ortiz, 2014). Nonetheless, any studies had been founded on technology companies competitiveness, so in the following sections a review will take place and the hypothesis of this article will be proposed.

 

2.1. CSR and Spanish technology sector

In the scientific literature there are an important number of studies on CSR both in large companies (Melé, Debeljuh & Arruda, 2006), and small ones (eg. Baumann-Pauly, Wickert, Spence & Scherer, 2013; Vázquez-Carrasco & López-Pérez, 2013; Herrera, Larrán & Martínez-Martínez, 2013) in different sectors eg. financial (Pérez Ruiz & Rodriguez del Bosque, 2012) and Banks (Alcaraz & Rodenas, 2013).; Martínez-Campillo, Head-García & Marbella-Sánchez, 2013), energy (Moseñe, Burritt, Sanagustín, Moneva & Tingey-Holyoak, 2013) and Public Administration (Bernal Conesa, De Nieves Nieto & Briones Peñalver, 2014; García-Sanchez Frias-Aceituno & Rodriguez-Dominguez, 2013) and even one that refers to technology companies (Guadamillas-Gómez, Donate-Manzanares & Skerlavaj, 2010); the possible motivations to adopt CSR (Prado-Lorenzo et al., 2008; Graafland & Schouten, 2012), and its integration with other management systems in the company (Bernardo, 2014; Von Ahsen, 2014; Castka & Balzarova, 2008). However, no studies have been found on CSR, their motivations and integration technology companies, which are a constant source of innovation, not only in processes but also products. Therefore, information about technology sector is scarce because the motivations of CSR and its integration have not been sufficiently studied. Thus, it is estimated interesting depth study of it in Spanish technology companies, since previous research has shown that organizations with a strategic focus on innovation committed to improve their internal organizational capacities to become more competitive in a global environment (Suñe, Bravo, Mundet & Herrera, 2012). In fact to promote product and process innovations, companies must adopt formalized CSR practices as this has a positive contribution to the competitiveness (Boulouta & Pitelis, 2014).

Four remarkable ways established in the scientific literature whereby CSR can create competitive advantages (Hockerts, 2015). These are:

  • risk reduction,

  • the efficiency gains,

  • social reputation and

  • the creation of new markets.

Several authors (Perrini, Russo & Tencati, 2007; Spence, 2007) have identified the sector as one of the elements affecting the organizational culture in adopting and integrating CSR practices in the strategic plans of organizations. For example, Perrini et al. (2007) found that companies in the sector of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) were more likely to monitor and report on the behaviour of their CSR, while manufacturing firms were more interested in motivating employees through voluntary activities in the community.

A study developed by Lorenzo, Sánchez and Álvarez (2009) states that the fact of belonging to the technology and telecommunications sector has a positive but not significant effect in the dissemination of CSR actions.

In certain technology sectors product development periods are extremely long and businesses often have negative results during the first years of life, put forward higher financing difficulties. In these cases, the financial indicators are not effective in assessing the potential of companies, being more appropriate intangible assets and knowledge - based (Quintana García, Benavides Velasco, & Guzman Parra, 2013).

Among these intangible assets we can find the CSR (Lindgreen, Antioco, Palmer & Heesch, 2009) which, as some studies have shown, has a positive relationship with the financial benefits (Hammann, Habisch & Pechlaner, 2009).

In addition, the activity of a company has a high social impact when it operates in ICT (Luna Sotorrío & Fernández Sánchez, 2010).

That is why we will investigate and analyze the situation of the Spanish technology companies against CSR, taking as a starting point located in Spanish Scientific and Technological Parks because in them there is a greater presence of high-tech companies (Vásquez-Urriago, Barge-Gil & Rico, 2012).

Companies located in technology parks show a greater effort in innovation (Vásquez-Urriago, Barge-Gil, Rico & Paraskevopoulou, 2014) and a significantly higher level of cooperation shown in the case of these companies (Vásquez-Urriago et al., 2012).

“Science park” concept was originated in the late 1950s in the American university context (Jimenez-Zarco, Cerdan-Chiscano & Torrent-Sellens, 2013). The success of technology parks such as Silicon Valley in California and Cambridge in the UK has influenced to replicate the model in other countries (Ratinho & Henriques, 2010).

In Spain, first parks emerged in the mid-1980s, following a strategy of attracting high - tech companies (Jimenez-Zarco et al., 2013) with the aim of contributing to economic and business growth at the local or regional level.

In 1988 the Spanish Science and Technology Parks Association (APTE) was created with the goal of making science and technology in key parts of Spanish innovation parks system. APTE takes care of contacting the scientific world inside and outside the parks with the business parks for the creation and transfer of knowledge, by setting regional innovation systems (Jimenez-Zarco et al., 2013) that is why Spain is an interesting case in science parks unlike other established in the United States or United Kingdom (Vásquez-Urriago et al., 2014).

Currently there are 68 science and technology parks associated to APTE and welcome them home businesses, nature and different interests: academic spin-offs Technological Base (EBT), Knowledge Based Companies (EBC) and start-ups (Jimenez-Zarco et al., 2013).

Albahari, Catalano and Landoni (2013) show how some parks contribute significantly to regional development, economic and social terms, since they favor the development of a specialized and innovative industry, and create the seed for the creation of an industrial cluster.

Technology parks have in common the creation of technology companies and attract companies already established in order to promote regional development through a technological approach and the creation of employment and welfare (Ratinho & Henriques, 2010; Jimenez-Zarco et al., 2013), so the technology parks would be directly related to two of the three dimensions of CSR (economic and social) and generate a network of cooperation between technology companies, which can increase the capacity of general knowledge and positively expand relations with own agents of business, if we add the adoption of CSR policies, will allow greater flexibility and opportunities to address social problems with innovative products or services, increasing the ability to attract, retain and motivate staff and access to new knowledge and information, so companies could increase their performance and competitiveness (Benito Hernandez & Esteban Sanchez, 2012).

Being located in a technology park has positive effects on product innovation and increases the odds of being innovative between 10% and 20%, and increases sales due to new products about 32% (Vásquez-Urriago et al., 2014).

In addition, companies located in parks are smaller on average, have higher export orientation, belong to a group of companies more often, are larger share of ups and have less frequent decrease in turnover by sale or closure of the company (Vásquez-Urriago et al., 2012).



2.2. Motivations of CSR and integration

Despite the difficulty of providing a definition of CSR (Dahlsrud, 2008), general idea extracted from all of them is that CSR means that companies must conduct the business by way of proving consideration to a wider social environment with the purpose of serving constructively the society needs.

 

2.2.1. Motivations for the implementation of CSR

The motivations for the implementation of CSR have been studied generally (Graafland & Schouten, 2012) in different countries (Prado-Lorenzo et al., 2008; Prajogo, Tang & Lai, 2012) and sectors, finding two different types of primary motivations: external or extrinsic to the organization, where the financial or economic nature to can be pointed in its relation benefit (Graafland & Schouten, 2012) and internal or intrinsic to the organization, which not only have to do with benefit of the organization but also with the staff values and beliefs that belong to organizations (Graafland & Schouten, 2012).

 

2.2.2. Integration of CSR in the organization

Referring to the integration of CSR in business literature reveals that very few companies have it integrated effectively (Bernardo, Casadesus, Karapetrovic & Heras, 2012; Karapetrovic & Casadesús, 2009), despite the benefits of such integration (Bernardo, Simon, Tarí & Molina-Azorín, 2015; Simon, Karapetrovic & Casadesús, 2012).

Therefore, the present study is based on the existence of different motivations for CSR, but also trying to detect which are these for technology companies, if there are "enablers" for their integration and if through this integration of CSR could contribute significantly to the competitiveness of the company.



3. Conceptual model and hypotheses

Based on the previous sections and analyzing the previous work cited therein concerning the existence of different motivations to adopt a CSR strategy in companies and their influence on it, this section try to focus which are these motivations for CSR in Spanish technology companies and once they have been detected how they could facilitate a proactive CSR strategy, proposing the following research hypotheses:

H1: There are different motivations for adopting CSR measures in order to facilitate the definitive implementation of CSR in the technology company.

H2: (a) the existence of standardized management systems (MS) -as Quality (Q), Environment (EMS) and / or Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) - prior to the adoption ofCSR measures facilitate the implementation of CSR and (b) help to their integration in the organization.

H3: The CSR integration into the company will be affected directly and positively by the ease of implementation of CSR measures.

H4: The CSR integration in the strategy of the organization has a positive influence on the competitiveness of the technology company.

These assumptions are summarized in the conceptual model reflected in Figure 1.

 

 

Figure 1. Conceptual model of hypothesis



4. Methodology

There are a variety of methods for aggregating existing data in the social sciences (Rodríguez Gutiérrez, Fuentes García & Sanchez Canizares, 2013). However, these are not generally applied in the field of CSR research. One of the most widely used methods is the factorial analysis, based mainly in works whose study is based on surveys (Rodríguez Gutiérrez et al., 2013).

To collect data, a total of 489 invitations were sent by email to access a direct link to the questionnaire. Finally, 98 companies completed the questionnaire, representing a response rate of 20, 04%. In the case of surveys using web tools including a link to access the survey, the response rate is around 30% (Arevalo, Aravind, Ayuso & Roca, 2013) although there are empirical studies with a rate of valid response between 10% and 20% (Ramos, Manzanares & Gomez, 2014; Chow & Chen, 2012; Homburg & Stebel, 2009).

For this study a specific questionnaire was designed, using the Likert scale 1-5 (1 "strongly disagree" and 5 "strongly agree"), because a large number of questions refer to issues that cannot be quantified with a specific value (e.g. implement CSR measures to increase employee motivation). Overall, the questionnaire included questions about the motivations of CSR implementation, integration with other management systems, ease of integration, adopting a CSR strategy and stakeholder for the organization, in line with other studies (Vázquez & Sánchez, 2013; Prajogo et al., 2012; De Godos Díez, Fernandez Gago, Head & García, 2012; Law & Gunasekaran, 2012; Díez & Gago, 2011).

To carry out the analysis, a structural equation model (SEM) has been used. The structural equation models are statistical procedures that allow to measure the functional hypothesis, predictive and causal, these being essential multivariate statistical tools for understanding many elements of research and conduct basic or applied research in the behavioral sciences, management, health and social (Bagozzi & Yi, 2011).

In structural equation modeling as Vasquez and Sanchez (2013) suggest, more complex relationships (with direct and indirect effects) while working with latent variables (not directly observable and must be measured by indicators) are assumed. This is the difference with classical multivariate regression models.

For the constructs formation has been used the following indicators, based on the literature (Battaglia et al, 2014; Gallardo-Vazquez & Sanchez-Hernandez, 2014; Turyakira et al., 2014; Asif, Searcy, Zutshi & Fisscher, 2013; Asif, Searcy, Zutshi & Ahmad, 2011; Lee, Park & Lee, 2013):



Motivations

Internal

MO 1

Improve working conditions of my workers

M O2

Reduce absenteeism

MO 3

Increase employee motivation

MO 4

Improve training and employee training

MO 5

Improve the effectiveness and control of operations

MO6

Building synergy between management systems

External

MO7

Law compliance

MO8

Comply with indications of stakeholders: customers, shareholders, environmental groups.

MO9

Improve relations with the community where the organization is established

MO10

Safeguard the rights of consumers

MO11

Reduce customer claims

MO12

Protecting the environment

MO13

Encouraging sustainable development

MO14

Improve the image of the company by match similar competitor actions

MO15

Be approved as provider of public bodies

MO16

Be approved as provider of private bodies

MO17

Reduce sanctions from  public bodies

MO18

Get aid or subsidies from public bodies

MO19

Meet requirements of third parties(e.g. administration, financial institutions, etc).

Implantation

Im1

Prior knowledge about implementation difficulties

Im2

Advantages to have a standardized management system (e.g.processes standardization, staff training)

Im3

Internal and external audit processes are known before certification

Im4

Different systems requirements are known, (e.g. legal compliance, management review, audits, indicators ...)

Im5

Synergies between systems are arising (e.g. sharing resources, common documentation, etc.)

Integration

Int1

Resources shared

Int2

Documented procedures Shared

Int3

Requirements shared

Int4

Management manual is unified

Int5

Staff shared

Previous Management Systems

SGP1

There is an only system management department 

SGP2

Workers are aware management systems and apply them daily without difficulties

SGP3

Certified systems are themselves the management system of the organization therefore the certificate is not a matter of image

Competitiveness

COM1

Increased sales are achieved

COM2

Saving cost

COM3

Improving access to finance

COM4

Revenue  grown

COM5

Improved company image or brand

COM6

Access to new markets or customers

COM7

Competitive advantages are obtained

COM8

ROI is improved

COM9

Customer satisfaction is improved

COM10

Collaborations are obtained with other organizations

COM11

Profitability is increased

COM12

Increasing financial returns

COM13

Absenteeism is recuced

COM14

Increase of employee satisfaction

COM15

Reducing labor unrest due to social affairs

COM16

Reconciling work and family life is provided

COM17

Employee participation in decision - making processes

Competitiveness

COM18

Increase investment in human resources, eg with training activities, career plan...

COM19

Increases equal opportunities at work, eg employment of disabled people, promoting women to leadership positions

COM20

Reducing the number of accidents

COM21

Improves occupational health and safety

COM22

The external image of the organization is improved

COM23

The internal image of the organization is improved

COM24

Employee motivation is favored

COM25

Leadership is demonstrated in the community

COM26

Improve relationships with the community

COM27

Cultural and sports activities in the community sponsor

COM28

It participates in other public actions positively

COM29

Consumer rights are emphasized

Table 1. Indicators. Note: Indicators in bold they are those who were validated in this study for the different scales of constructs

 

The structural equation models include two levels of analysis (the measurement model and the structural model) (Hair Jr., Sarstedt, Hopkins & Kuppelwieser, 2014). Measurement model determines the relationships between the latent variables (constructs) and their indicators. Structural model examines the relationship between constructs (Chen & Chang, 2011), which includes determining whether the structural relationships are significant and meaningful, and testing hypotheses. Sum up, structural model is similar to performing a regression but with explanatory power (Vázquez & Sánchez, 2013) analysis, studying the direct and indirect effects set of constructs.

4.1. Statistical analysis

The technique chosen within SEM is known as Partial Least Squares (PLS), for different reasons because:

  • PLS-SEM has been broadly used in prior IT research (Wang, Chen & Benitez-Amado, 2015 technology; Chen & Chang, 2011; Pavlou & El Sawy, 2006);

  • the use of PLS is recommended when the theoretical knowledge of a topic is scarce (Hair Jr. et al., 2014) as is the case (RSC and technology companies) and also PLS-SEM is more appropriate for causal applications and theory buildings (Roldán & Sánchez-Franco, 2012; Henseler et al., 2014) although it can also be used for confirming all these theories (confirmatory analysis) through the goodness of fit of the global structural model (Dijkstra & Henseler, 2015),

  • PLS can estimate models with reflective and formative indicators without problem of identification (Vinzi, Chin, Henseler & Wang, 2010) because PLS path modeling works with weighted composites rather than factors (Gefen, Rigdon & Straub, 2011);

  • PLS can be estimated models with small samples, in fact, the PLS modeling algorithms tend to get results with high levels of statistical power (Reinartz, Haenlein & Henseler, 2009), even when the sample size is very modest (Rigdon, 2014). Thus, and following Henseler et al. (2014) used PLS as a remarkable statistical tool for management and research organizations.

The software used was SmartPLS 2.0 M3, developed by Ringle, Wende and Will in 2005. Since SmartPLS is an estimation model and SEM analysis, uses the estimation process in two steps, evaluating the model measurement and structural model (Hair Jr. et al., 2014). First, the measurement model where the relationship between the indicators and the construct is determined (Roldán & Sánchez-Franco, 2012). Secondly, the estimation of the structural model, where relationships are evaluated between different constructs. The following criteria facilitate this assessment: path coefficients (β) and their significance levels (t-student), coefficient of determination (R2) andcross-validated redundancy (Q2) (Hair Jr. et al., 2014).

This sequence ensures that we have the indicators suitable for the constructs before trying to reach conclusions about the relationships included in the model internal or structural (Roldán & Sánchez-Franco, 2012).

4.1.1. Analysis of the measurement model

The measurement model defines the latent variables that the model will use, and assigns manifest variables to each. The assessment of the measurement model for reflective indicators in PLS is based on individual item reliability, construct reliability, convergent validity (Fornell & Larcker, 1981; Tenenhaus, Vinzi, Chatelin & Lauro, 2005) and discriminant validity (Hair, Sarstedt, Ringle & Mena, 2012).

Individual item reliability is assessed by analyzing the standardized loadings (λ), or simple correlations of the indicators with their respective latent variable (Hair Jr. et al., 2014).Individual item reliability is considered adequate when an item has a factor loading (λ) that is greater than 0.707 on its respective construct (Carmines & Zeller, 1979). In this study, all reflective indicators have loadings above 0.710 (boldface numbers in Table 2).



Indicator

motivations

Implantation

Integration

Previous MS

competitiveness

MO7

0.786

0.403

0.215

0.230

0.144

MO11

0.712

0.225

0.321

0.292

0.208

MO14

0.732

0.382

0.346

0.336

0.155

MO15

0.822

0.279

0.325

0.251

0.343

MO16

0.848

0.352

0.345

0.339

0.304

MO17

0.831

0.251

0.280

0.251

0.186

MO19

0.867

0.349

0.364

0.256

0.398

Im1

0.350

0.811

0.563

0.542

0.318

Im2

0.258

0.710

0.409

0.397

0.119

Im3

0.301

0.898

0.602

0.565

0.293

Im4

0.434

0.930

0.704

0.603

0.326

Im5

0.399

0.897

0.710

0.499

0.330

Int1

0.353

0.632

0.901

0.653

0.381

Int2

0.411

0.721

0.932

0.682

0.364

Int3

0.362

0.698

0.902

0.663

0.288

Int4

0.398

0.642

0.923

0.715

0.252

Int5

0.188

0.448

0.765

0.640

0.387

SGP1

0.332

0.480

0.742

0.892

0.465

SGP2

0.366

0.534

0.637

0.879

0.413

SGP3

0.249

0.640

0.654

0.917

0.344

COM6

0.346

0.344

0.411

0.425

0.813

COM7

0.242

0.274

0.207

0.287

0.837

COM8

0.344

0.246

0.208

0.274

0.794

COM11

0.246

0.202

0.257

0.325

0.816

COM12

0.250

0.218

0.302

0.372

0.744

COM13

0.395

0.256

0.252

0.344

0.798

COM14

0.150

0.241

0.270

0.397

0.880

COM15

0.231

0.315

0.375

0.510

0.858

COM16

0.142

0.423

0.380

0.498

0.774

COM17

0.206

0.361

0.453

0.525

0.841

COM18

0.270

0.335

0.253

0.315

0.882

COM20

0.292

0.268

0.277

0.272

0.841

COM21

0.341

0.268

0.254

0.238

0.835

COM23

0.154

0.078

0.138

0.269

0.752

COM24

0.179

0.233

0.259

0.250

0.882

COM25

0.274

0.096

0.302

0.317

0.783

Table 2. Loadings and cross-loadings for the measurement model

 

In the measurement models with reflective indicators, construct reliabilityis usually assessed using composite reliability(c) (Hair Jr. et al., 2014) and Cronbach´s α (Castro & Roldan, 2013).

Following the guidelines proposed by Nunnally and Bernstein (1994) which suggest a value of 0.7 as a benchmark for reliability modest applicable in the early stages of research. In this research, the five constructs are analyzed high internal consistency as recommended levels are exceeded, as for the composite reliability even the most restrictive threshold is exceeded proposed Nunnally and Bernstein (1994) 0.8 (see Table 3).

 

To assess convergent validity, we examine the average variance extracted (AVE). AVE values should be higher than 0.50 (Fornell & Larcker, 1981) which means that 50 per cent -or more- of variance of indicators should be accounted for the construct (Hair Jr. et al., 2014).

Discriminant validity indicates the extent to which a given construct differs from other constructs. In other words, the construct measures what really intended. Discriminant validity was analyzed by two methods (Gefen & Straub, 2005). On one hand Fornell and Larcker (1981) suggest the use of the average variance shared between a construct and its measures (AVE). This method provides that the construct must be formed with more variance than any other indicators construct.

To put this idea into operation the AVE square root of each construct should be greater than its correlations with any other construct in the assessment. This condition is satisfied by all constructs in relation to their other variables (see Table 3).

On the other hand, the second approach suggests that each item should load more highly on its assigned construct than others, as occurs in the Table 2. This method is often considered less restrictive than the previous (Henseler, Ringle & Sinkovics, 2009).

 

 

rc

a

AVE

Competitiveness

Implantation

Integration

Motivations

Previous MS

Competitiveness

0.971

0.968

0.675

0.822

 

 

 

 

Implantation

0.930

0.905

0.728

0.335

0.853

 

 

 

Integration

0.948

0.931

0.786

0.376

0.713

0.887

 

 

Motivations

0.926

0.907

0.643

0.308

0.415

0.390

0.802

 

Previous MS

0.925

0.878

0.804

0.453

0.616

0.756

0.350

0.896

Table 3. Composite Reliability (rc), coefficients of convergent and discriminant validity

 

4.1.2. Analysis of the structural model

Once the reliability and validity of the measurement model are established, several steps need to be taken to assess the hypothetical relationships within the structural model (Hair Jr. et al., 2014), which assesses the weight and magnitude relations between different constructs.

The assessment of the model’s quality is based on its ability to predict endogenous constructs. The following criteria facilitate this assessment: path coefficients β and their significance levels (t-student), coefficient of determination (R2) and cross-validated redundancy (Q2) (Roldán & Sánchez-Franco, 2012).

First, we tested the significance of all the paths from the structural model. Standardized path coefficients allow to analyze the degree of accomplishment the hypotheses. In this regard, Chin (1998) proposed that the analysis should provide standardized path coefficients exceeding values greater than 0.2 and ideally 0.3 so whether β<0.2 there is no causality and the hypothesis is rejected (Ramírez-Correa, 2014).

According to Hair et al. (2012) one was used bootstrapping (5,000 resamples) to generate statistical t-Student and its standard error, which allowed us to evaluate the statistical significance of the coefficients path (Castro & Roldan, 2013) and the hypotheses, as shown in Table 4.

 

Hypothesis

β

Standard Error

t- Student

accepted

H1

Motivations - > Implementation

0.227

0,087

2,587

YES **

H2a

Pre. MS -> Implementation

0.536

0,100

5,342

YES ***

H2b

Pre. MS -> Integration

0.511

0.116

4,404

YES ***

H3

Implementation -> Integration

0.398

0,113

3,507

YES ***

H4

Integration -> Competitiveness

0.376

0.114

3,290

YES ***

Note: t (0.05, 4999) = 1.645158499, t (4999 0.01.) = 2.327094067, t (0.001, 4999) = 3.091863446* P <0.05.** P <0.01.*** P <0.001.ns. No significant based on t (4999), one-tailed test.

Table 4. Contrast hypotheses

 

Second, the explained variance is analyzed. The goodness of a model is determined by the strength of each structural relationship and analyzed using the value of R2 for each dependent construct. According to Falk and Miller (1992), these values should be greater than 0.1 to consider that the model has sufficient predictive ability. The R2 is a measure of the model’s predictive accuracy (Hair et al., 2014) and therefore R2 values measure the construct variance explained by the model (Serrano-Cinca, Fuertes‐Callén & Gutiérrez‐Nieto, 2007) with values 0.75, 0.50 and 0.25, respectively, describe substantial, moderate, or weak levels of predictive accuracy (Hair Jr et al, 2014; Henseler et al, 2009), as shown in Figure 2, all R2 are between 0.1 and 0.75, so have a predictive ability in varying degrees.

Finally, a Stone-Giesser´s test or Cross-validated redundancy index (Q2) was used to assess the predictive relevance of the endogenous constructs with a reflective measurement model (Wang et al, 2015; Roldán & Sánchez-Franco, 2012). Therefore, it means for assessing the structural model’s predictive relevance (Hair Jr. et al., 2014). The cross-validated redundancy index (Q2) is used for endogenous reflective constructs (Castro & Roldán, 2013). A Q2 greater than 0 implies that the model has predictive relevance, whereas a Q2 less than 0 suggests that is lacking in the model (Hair Jr. et al., 2014). In our case all Q2 obtained have positive sign and are greater than 0, as seen in Figure 2.

 

Figure 2. Testing Hypothesis

 

5. Results and discussion

The results obtained confirm the relationships established in the research model and the structural model has satisfactory predictive relevance for the three dependent variables: the implementation of CSR and the actual integration of CSR in the organization and competitiveness of the company, being able therefore affirm that all the hypotheses are accepted.

Nevertheless, hypothesis model does not reflect all existing relationships, so in the following table (Table 5) all results (direct and indirect) are reflected. In this table, the relationship between the previous systems management and competitiveness are shown. This relationship is significant, however relations 5 and 6 and 7 have β lower than 0.2 and therefore they are not considered.

 

Relations

β

Standard Error

T-Student

Level significant

H1

Motivations -> Implementation

0.227

0.087

2,587

**

H2a

Pre MS -> Implementation

0.536

0,100

5,342

***

H2b

 Pre MS -> Integration

0.51 1

0.116

4,404

***

H3

Implementation -> Integration

0.398

0.113

3,507

***

H4

Integration -> Competitiveness Perceived

0.376

0.114

3,290

***

5

Implementation -> Competitiveness

0.149

0.0672

2.2304

*

6

Motivations -> Competitiveness Perceived

0.034

0.0237

1.4364

ns

7

Motivations -> Integration

0.090

0.0453

1.9979

*

8

SG Pre -> Competitiveness Perceived

0.272

0.0917

2.9742

**

Note: t (0.05, 4999) = 1.645158499, t (4999 0.01.) = 2.327094067, t (0.001, 4999) = 3.091863446

* P <0.05. ** P <0.01. *** P <0.001. Ns. No significant based on t (4999), a test-cola

Table 5. Total effects (direct and indirect)

 

Although the H1 hypothesis confirms that there are reasons for implementing CSR in technology companies, they are only the external type in contrast by Graafland and Schouten (2012). Moreover, a lack of correlation with respect to some observables (e.g.MO1, MO2, MO3, MO5) was found, in spite of being considered components fundamental strategies CSR by some scholars (Marín et al., 2012). So, these issues do not seem important for companies operating in the technology industry in line with other studies (Battaglia et al., 2014). This circumstance is apparently linked to the fact the most common size of the analyzed companies are micro and small enterprises as the indicators are not among the validated are those related to workers. Therefore, it would open here a possible line of research between CSR and human factor in field of technology companies.

In regard to Previous Management System (H2), the results confirm what other authors suggested. So, these systems are facilitators of the integration of CSR and have positive indirect effects (Battaglia et al., 2014) and significant on competitiveness (see Table 5).

Once CSR are adopted into organization, CSR could be used to reinforce the corporate strategy, as suggested Isaksson, Kiessling and Harvey (2014) since one occurs real integration (H3) and significant, so that CSR is part of a strategic intangible in line with other studies (Bocquet et al., 2013) that contribute to innovation and competitiveness of the enterprise technology.

On the other hand, the relationship between CSR and perceived competitiveness from technological company is confirmed in the H4 hypothesis raised in line with other studies (Hockerts, 2015). In fact, there are certain factors (e.g. COM6, COM7, COM8, COM13, COM14, COM15, COM21, COM24 and COM25) that contribute to this relationship as suggested Hockerts (2015) and Turyakira et al. (2014). The opposite of what would be expected from these studies (Turyakira et al., 2014) other factors do not contribute to the competitiveness of the technology company (e.g. COM26 and COM27), among them the COM3 "Improving access to finance", contrary to what was stated by Quintana García et al., (2013) and established by Battaglia et al. (2014). Therefore would need to establish a line future research that will lead to study the effect of CSR performance and financial - economic as suggested by some authors (Boulouta & Pitelis, 2014; Pamiés & Jimenez, 2011; Van Beurden & Gössling, 2008).

 

6. Conclusions

In the present study, the aim has been to examine the motivations of implementing CSR in technology companies, its implementation and integration and its effect on the competitiveness of these enterprises through the application of a predictive model and an analysis statistical since the study the role of technology companies in environmental management, sustainability and CSR is still in its early stages initial (Wang et al., 2015).

Through the study, it is intended to cover the detected gap on the motivations in technology companies to implement CSR measures, because although there are previous studies of motivations for CSR, integration and results in Spanish companies, such as made from a regional point of view (Gallardo-Vázquez & Sanchez-Hernandez, 2014; Vintró, Fortuny, Sanmiquel, Freijo & Edo, 2012) or by analyzing a single aspect of that relationship (Prado-Lorenzo et al., 2008). Thus, the absence of previous empirical studies to analyze the motivations of CSR in the technology sector in Spain, its integration into the company and its impact on competitiveness, justified his conduct and considered coming to add an investigator supplement to studies linking CSR and its integration into business, because this relationship is not studied with a direct effect only, but found out an indirect relationship through of previous management systems as variable partial mediation on competitiveness.

This study proposes a model that explains the measures CSR in technology companies and its influence on the competitiveness of these companies. The model reveals that the construct (Integration of CSR) has one significant influence on competitiveness. To demonstrate this latter have raised a number of hypotheses through constructs or latent variables, which are not directly observable and have assumed that relations between them are complex. The model has been estimated by SEM technique has been tested using a sample of Spanish technology companies.

The results show that the motivations (in this case, external), management systems previously adopted by enterprises and the implementation of means of CSR are interrelated, so that the previous management systems and the implementation of measures CSR mediate significantly on the effect of real integration of CSR in the organization and this in turn has a direct effect on competitiveness perceived. Consequently, the results have implications both theoretical and practical.

So, the validated model can help entrepreneurs technological and managers understand why they should pay attention to CSR issues and what is expected of them and their efforts towards environmental and social development of their organization, beyond pure development economic.

From a practical standpoint technology companies can use the results of this study as a fulcrum to promote the integration of CSR into their corporate strategy through concrete measures RSC as the training of their workers, sustainable knowledge and communication with stakeholders and others and take advantage of synergies in the management created between management systems and the RSC, as the integration of CSR in technology companies, as has been shown, has a direct relationship with competitiveness in line with other studies (De Vries, Terwel, Ellemers & Daamen, 2015; Gallardo-Vazquez & Sanchez-Hernandez, 2014; Swanson & Zhang, 2012).

Despite the contributions of this study, it also has some limitations. First, while the fact that the sample is restricted to companies in Spain could be seen as a lack of generalizability of the results, it is also true that our results are consistent with the literature and the results of previous studies from no Spanish samples (e.g. Turyakira et al., 2014; Hur et al., 2014) which clearly supports the validity of our results beyond the Spanish borders. In addition, this study has an associative modeling approach, since it will be directed towards the prediction of causality. While causality ensures the ability to control events, the association (prediction) only allows a limited degree of control (Falk & Miller, 1992).

Secondly, another limitation is determined by the technique used for the proposed model: structural equation, which assumes a linearity of the relationship between the latent variables (Castro & Roldan, 2013).

Thirdly, technology companies are dynamic organizations that change over time. Consequently, future research should measure the constructs analyzed over several time periods, taking into account the dynamics to configure the different dimensions of CSR.

However, given the limitations noted above, the work has to be seen as a pioneer, as it represents a starting point for aspects of CSR in any technology company and covers the gap detected in the literature. Therefore, as future research is proposed to test a structural model to analyze the causal relationship between the orientation of technological companies towards CSR and performance economic. The results of this model indicate whether the CSR strategy, or to a significant extent, explain the competitive success and its relationship to performance. If so, it would be an interesting strategy for technology companies that develop determine:

  • the strategic intent of CSR;

  • participate in CSR for a specific benefit;

  • addressing CSR as an investment in intangible assets;

  • focus on a specific category of stakeholders (e.g. customers, employees, suppliers, etc.);

  • to decide how to communicate CSR initiatives; and

  • design and manage the process of decision making of CSR.

 

References

Albahari, A., Catalano, G., & Landoni, P. (2013). Evaluation of national science park systems: A theoretical framework and its application to the Italian and Spanish systems. Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, 25(5), 599-614. https:/doi.org/10.1080/09537325.2013.785508

Alcaraz, A.S., & Rodenas, S.P. (2013). The Spanish Banks in face of the Corporate Social Responsibility Standards: Previous analysis of the financial crisis. Review of Business Management, 15(49), 562-581. https:/doi.org/10.7819/rbgn.v15i49.1386

Apospori, E., Zografos, K.G., & Magrizos, S. (2012). SME corporate social responsibility and competitiveness: A literature review. International Journal of Technology Management, 58(1/2), 10-31. https:/doi.org/10.1504/IJTM.2012.045786

Arevalo, J.A., Aravind, D., Ayuso, S., & Roca, M. (2013). The Global Compact: an analysis of the motivations of adoption in the Spanish context. Business Ethics: A European Review, 22(1), 1-15. https:/doi.org/10.1111/beer.12005

Asif, M., Searcy, C., Zutshi, A., & Ahmad, N. (2011). An integrated management systems approach to corporate sustainability. European Business Review, 23(4), 353-367. https:/doi.org/10.1108/09555341111145744

Asif, M., Searcy, C., Zutshi, A., & Fisscher, O.A.M. (2013). An integrated management systems approach to corporate social responsibility. Journal of Cleaner Production, 56, 7-17. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2011.10.034

Bagozzi, R.P., & Yi, Y. (2011). Specification, evaluation, and interpretation of structural equation models. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 40(1), 8-34. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s11747-011-0278-x

Battaglia, M., Testa, F., Bianchi, L., Iraldo, F., & Frey, M. (2014). Corporate Social Responsibility and Competitiveness within SMEs of the Fashion Industry: Evidence from Italy and France. Sustainability, 6(2), 872-893. https:/doi.org/10.3390/su6020872

Baumann-Pauly, D., Wickert, C., Spence, L.J., & Scherer, A.G. (2013). Organizing Corporate Social Responsibility in Small and Large Firms: Size Matters. Journal of Business Ethics, 115(4), 693-705. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-013-1827-7

Benito Hernández, S., & Esteban Sánchez, P. (2012). La influencia de las políticas de responsabilidad social y la pertenencia a redes de cooperación en el capital relacional y estructural de las microempresas. Investigaciones Europeas de Dirección y Economía de la Empresa, 18(2), 166-176. https:/doi.org/10.1016/S1135-2523(12)70007-2

Bernal Conesa, J.A., De Nieves Nieto, C., & Briones Peñalver, A.J. (2014). Implantación de la Responsabilidad Social en la Administración Pública: El caso de las Fuerzas Armadas Españolas. Revista de Responsabilidad Social de la Empresa, 18(III), 101-124.

Bernardo, M. (2014). Integration of management systems as an innovation: a proposal for a new model. Journal of Cleaner Production, 82, 132-142. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2014.06.089

Bernardo, M., Casadesus, M., Karapetrovic, S., & Heras, I. (2012). Integration of standardized management systems: Does the implementation order matter?. International Journal of Operations & Production Management, 32(3), 291-307. https:/doi.org/10.1108/01443571211212583

Bernardo, M., Simon, A., Tarí, J.J., & Molina-Azorín, J.F. (2015). Benefits of Management Systems integration: A literature review. Journal of Cleaner Production. Retrieved February 17, 2015, from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959652615000803 https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2015.01.075

Bocquet, R., Le Bas, C., Mothe, C., & Poussing, N. (2013). Are firms with different CSR profiles equally innovative? Empirical analysis with survey data. European Management Journal, 31(6), 642-654. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.emj.2012.07.001

Boulouta, I., & Pitelis, C.N. (2014). Who Needs CSR? The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on National Competitiveness. Journal of Business Ethics, 119(3), 349-364. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-013-1633-2

Carmines, E.G., & Zeller, R.A. (1979). Reliability and Validity Assessment. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications. https:/doi.org/10.4135/9781412985642

Castka, P., & Balzarova, M.A. (2008). Adoption of social responsibility through the expansion of existing management systems. Industrial Management & Data Systems, 108(3-4), 297-309. https:/doi.org/10.1108/02635570810858732

Castro, I., & Roldán, J.L. (2013). A mediation model between dimensions of social capital. International Business Review, 22(6), 1034-1050. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.ibusrev.2013.02.004

Chen, Y.-S., & Chang, C.-H. (2011). Utilize structural equation modeling (SEM) to explore the influence of corporate environmental ethics: The mediation effect of green human capital. Quality & Quantity, 47(1), 79-95. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s11135-011-9504-3

Chin, W.W. (1998). Commentary: Issues and opinion on structural equation modeling. JSTOR. Retrieved April 13, 2015, from: http://www.jstor.org/stable/249674

Chow, W. S., & Chen, Y. (2012). Corporate Sustainable Development: Testing a New Scale Based on the Mainland Chinese Context. Journal of Business Ethics, 105(4), 519-533. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-011-0983-x

Dahlsrud, A. (2008). How corporate social responsibility is defined: An analysis of 37 definitions. Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, 15(1), 1-13. https:/doi.org/10.1002/csr.132

Damanpour, F., & Gopalakrishnan, S. (2001). The dynamics of the adoption of product and process innovations in organizations. Journal of Management Studies, 38(1), 45-65. https:/doi.org/10.1111/1467-6486.00227

De Godos Díez, J.L., Fernández Gago, R., & Cabeza García, L. (2012). Propiedad y control en la puesta en práctica de la RSC. Cuadernos de Economía y Dirección de la Empresa, 15(1), 1-11. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.cede.2011.06.002

De Vries, G., Terwel, B.W., Ellemers, N., & Daamen, D.D.L. (2015). Sustainability or Profitability? How Communicated Motives for Environmental Policy Affect Public Perceptions of Corporate Greenwashing. Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, 22(3), 142-154. https:/doi.org/10.1002/csr.1327

Díez, J.L.G., & Gago, R.F. (2011). ¿Cómo se percibe la dirección socialmente responsable por parte de los altos directivos de empresas en España?. Universia Business Review, (29), 32-49.

Dijkstra, T.K., & Henseler, J. (2015). Consistent and asymptotically normal PLS estimators for linear structural equations. Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, 81, 10-23.  https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.csda.2014.07.008

Falk, R.F., & Miller, N.B. (1992). A Primer for Soft Modeling (1st edition.). Akron, Ohio: Univ of Akron Pr.

Fornell, C., & Larcker, D. (1981). Evaluating Structural Equation Models with Unobservable Variables and Measurement Error. Journal of Marketing Research, 18(1), 39-50. https:/doi.org/10.2307/3151312

Gallardo-Vázquez, D., & Sanchez-Hernandez, M.I. (2014). Measuring Corporate Social Responsibility for competitive success at a regional level. Journal of Cleaner Production, 72, 14-22. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2014.02.051

García-Sánchez, I.-M., Frías-Aceituno, J.-V., & Rodríguez-Domínguez, L. (2013). Determinants of corporate social disclosure in Spanish local governments. Journal of Cleaner Production, 39, 60-72. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2012.08.037

Gefen, D., Rigdon, E.E., & Straub, D. (2011). An Update and Extension to SEM Guidelines for Administrative and Social Science Research. Mis Quarterly, 35(2), III-XIV.

Gefen, D., & Straub, D. (2005). A practical guide to factorial validity using PLS-Graph: Tutorial and annotated example. Communications of the Association for Information systems, 16(1), 5.

Goldsmith, S. (2010). The Power of Social Innovation: How Civic Entrepreneurs Ignite Community Networks for Good. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Graafland, J., & Schouten, C.M.-V. Der D. (2012). Motives for Corporate Social Responsibility. De Economist, 160(4), 377-396. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10645-012-9198-5

Guadamillas-Gómez, F.J., Donate-Manzanares, M., & Skerlavaj, M. (2010). The integration of corporate social responsibility into the strategy of technology-intensive firms: A case study. Zbornik radova Ekonomskog fakulteta u Rijeci: \vcasopis za ekonomsku teoriju i praksu, 28(1), 9-34.

Hair, J. F., Sarstedt, M., Ringle, C.M., & Mena, J.A. (2012). An assessment of the use of partial least squares structural equation modeling in marketing research. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 40(3), 414-433. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s11747-011-0261-6

Hair Jr, J.F., Sarstedt, M., Hopkins, L., & Kuppelwieser, V.G. (2014). Partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM): An emerging tool in business research. European Business Review, 26(2), 106-121. https:/doi.org/10.1108/EBR-10-2013-0128

Hammann, E.-M., Habisch, A., & Pechlaner, H. (2009). Values that create value: socially responsible business practices in SMEs - empirical evidence from German companies. Business Ethics: A European Review, 18(1), 37-51. https:/doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8608.2009.01547.x

Henseler, J., Dijkstra, T.K., Sarstedt, M., Ringle, C.M., Diamantopoulos, A., Straub, D. W. et al. (2014). Common Beliefs and Reality About PLS: Comments on Ronnkko and Evermann (2013). Organizational Research Methods, 17(2), 182-209. https:/doi.org/10.1177/1094428114526928

Henseler, J., Ringle, C.M., & Sinkovics, R.R. (2009). The use of partial least squares path modeling in international marketing. New Challenges to International Marketing, Advances in International Marketing, 1-0(20), 277-319. Emerald Group Publishing Limited. Retrieved April 9, 2015, from: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/S1474-7979(2009)0000020014

Herrera, J., Larrán, M., & Martínez-Martínez, D. (2013). Relación entre responsabilidad social y performance en las pequeñas y medianas empresas: Revisión bibliográfica. Cuadernos de Gestión, 13(2), 39-65. https:/doi.org/10.5295/cdg.120360jh

Hillenbrand, C., Money, K., & Ghobadian, A. (2013). Unpacking the Mechanism by which Corporate Responsibility Impacts Stakeholder Relationships. British Journal of Management, 24(1), 127-146. https:/doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8551.2011.00794.x

Hockerts, K. (2015). A Cognitive Perspective on the Business Case for Corporate Sustainability: A Cognitive Perspective of the Business Case. Business Strategy and the Environment, 24(2), 102-122. https:/doi.org/10.1002/bse.1813

Homburg, C., & Stebel, P. (2009). Determinants of contract terms for professional services. Management Accounting Research, 20(2), 129-145. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.mar.2008.10.001

Hur, W.-M., Kim, H., & Woo, J. (2014). How CSR Leads to Corporate Brand Equity: Mediating Mechanisms of Corporate Brand Credibility and Reputation. Journal of Business Ethics, 125(1), 75-86. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-013-1910-0

Isaksson, L., Kiessling, T., & Harvey, M. (2014). Corporate social responsibility: Why bother?. Organizational Dynamics, 43(1), 64-72. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.orgdyn.2013.10.008

Janssen, C., Sen, S., & Bhattacharya, C. (2015). Corporate crises in the age of corporate social responsibility. Business Horizons, Emerging Issues In Crisis Management, 58(2), 183-192. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.bushor.2014.11.002

Jimenez-Zarco, A.I., Cerdan-Chiscano, M., & Torrent-Sellens, J. (2013). Challenges and Opportunities in the Management of Science Parks: design of a tool based on the analysis of resident companies. Review of Business Management. Retrieved February 10, 2014, from; http://apps.webofknowledge.com/InboundService.do?SID=P26vG5IkeT12mbD3PbS&product=WOS&UT=000327498300003&SrcApp=CR&DestFail=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.webofknowledge.com&Init=Yes&action=retrieve&Func=Frame&customersID=PCS&IsProductCode=Yes&mode=FullRecord https:/doi.org/10.7819/rbgn.v15i48.1503

Karapetrovic, S., & Casadesús, M. (2009). Implementing environmental with other standardized management systems: Scope, sequence, time and integration. Journal of Cleaner Production, 17(5), 533540. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2008.09.006

Law, K.M.Y., & Gunasekaran, A. (2012). Sustainability development in high-tech manufacturing firms in Hong Kong: Motivators and readiness. International Journal of Production Economics, 137(1), 116-125. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2012.01.022

Lee, E.M., Park, S.-Y., & Lee, H.J. (2013). Employee perception of CSR activities: Its antecedents and consequences. Journal of Business Research, 66(10), 1716-1724. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2012.11.008

Lindgreen, A., Antioco, M., Palmer, R., & Van Heesch, T. (2009). High-tech, innovative products: identifying and meeting business customers’ value needs. Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, 24(3/4), 182-197. https:/doi.org/10.1108/08858620910939732

Lorenzo, J.M.P., Sánchez, I.M.G., & Álvarez, I.G. (2009). Características del consejo de administración e información en materia de responsabilidad social corporativa. Revista española de financiación y contabilidad, (141), 107-135. https:/doi.org/10.1080/02102412.2009.10779664

Luna Sotorrío, L., & Fernández Sánchez, J.L. (2010). Corporate social reporting for different audiences: the case of multinational corporations in Spain. Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, 17(5), 272-283. https:/doi.org/10.1002/csr.215

Marín, L., Rubio, A., & De Maya, S.R. (2012). Competitiveness as a Strategic Outcome of Corporate Social Responsibility: Competitiveness and CSR. Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, 19(6), 364-376. https:/doi.org/10.1002/csr.1288

Martínez-Campillo, A., Cabeza-García, L., & Marbella-Sánchez, F. (2013). Responsabilidad social corporativa y resultado financiero: Evidencia sobre la doble dirección de la causalidad en el sector de las Cajas de Ahorros. Cuadernos de Economía y Dirección de la Empresa, 16(1), 54-68. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.cede.2012.04.005

Melé, D., Argandoña, A., & Sanchez-Runde, C. (2011). Facing the Crisis: Toward a New Humanistic Synthesis for Business. Journal of Business Ethics, 99(1), 1-4. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-011-0743-y

Melé, D., Debeljuh, P., & Arruda, M.C. (2006). Corporate Ethical Policies in Large Corporations in Argentina, Brazil and Spain. Journal of Business Ethics, 63(1), 21-38. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-005-7100-y

Mendoza, S., De Nieves, C., & Briones, A.J. (2010). Capacidades Empresariales en Responsabilidad Social y Cooperación en los Agronegocios de la Región de Murcia.

Moseñe, J.A., Burritt, R.L., Sanagustín, M.V., Moneva, J.M., & Tingey-Holyoak, J. (2013). Environmental reporting in the Spanish wind energy sector: An institutional view. Journal of Cleaner Production, 40, 199-211. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2012.08.023

Nunnally, J.C., & Bernstein, I.H. (1994). Psychometric Theory (3rd edition.). New York: McGraw-Hill.

Pamiés, D.S., & Jiménez, J.A. (2011). La naturaleza de la relación entre la responsabilidad social de la empresa (RSE) y el resultado financiero. Revista europea de dirección y economía de la empresa, 20(4), 161176.

Pavlou, P.A., & El Sawy, O.A. (2006). From IT Leveraging Competence to Competitive Advantage in Turbulent Environments: The Case of New Product Development. Information Systems Research, 17(3), 198-227. https:/doi.org/10.1287/isre.1060.0094

Pérez, A., & Del Bosque, I.R. (2012). Measuring CSR Image: Three Studies to Develop and to Validate a Reliable Measurement Tool. Journal of Business Ethics, 118(2), 265-286. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-012-1588-8

Pérez Ruiz, A., & Rodríguez Del Bosque, I. (2012). La imagen de Responsabilidad Social Corporativa en un contexto de crisis económica: El caso del sector financiero en España. Universia Business Review, 33, 14-29.

Perrini, F., Russo, A., & Tencati, A. (2007). CSR Strategies of SMEs and Large Firms. Evidence from Italy. Journal of Business Ethics, 74(3), 285-300. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-006-9235-x

Prado-Lorenzo, J.-M., Gallego-Álvarez, I., García-Sánchez, I.-M., & Rodríguez-Domínguez, L. (2008). Social responsibility in Spain: Practices and motivations in firms. Management Decision, 46(8), 12471271. https:/doi.org/10.1108/00251740810901417

Prahalad, C.K. & Ramaswamy, V. (2004). Co‐creating unique value with customers. Strategy & Leadership, 32(3), 4-9. https:/doi.org/10.1108/10878570410699249

Prajogo, D., Tang, A.K.Y., & Lai, K. (2012). Do firms get what they want from ISO 14001 adoption?: An Australian perspective. Journal of Cleaner Production, 33, 117-126.  https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2012.04.019

Quintana García, C., Benavides Velasco, C.A., & Guzmán Parra, V.F. (2013). Capacidades de investigación y directivas: señales informativas en la salida a bolsa de las empresas de base tecnológica. Cuadernos de Economía y Dirección de la Empresa, 16(4), 270-280.  https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.cede.2013.06.005

Ramírez-Correa, P. (2014). Uso de internet móvil en Chile: Explorando los antecedentes de su aceptación a nivel individual. Ingeniare. Revista chilena de ingeniería, 22(4), 560-566. https:/doi.org/10.4067/S0718-33052014000400011

Ramos, M.I.G., Manzanares, M.J.D., & Gómez, F.G. (2014). El efecto del papel mediador de la reputación corporativa en la relación entre la rsc y los resultados económicos. Revista de Estudios Empresariales. Segunda Época, (1). Retrieved March 12, 2015, from: http://revistaselectronicas.ujaen.es/index.php/REE/article/view/1378

Ratinho, T., & Henriques, E. (2010). The role of science parks and business incubators in converging countries: Evidence from Portugal. Technovation, 30(4), 278-290.  https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.technovation.2009.09.002

Reinartz, W., Haenlein, M., & Henseler, J. (2009). An empirical comparison of the efficacy of covariance-based and variance-based SEM. International Journal of Research in Marketing, 26(4), 332344. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.ijresmar.2009.08.001

Rigdon, E.E. (2014). Rethinking Partial Least Squares Path Modeling: Breaking Chains and Forging Ahead. Long Range Planning, Rethinking Partial Least Squares Path Modeling: Looking Back and Moving Forward, 47(3), 161-167. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.lrp.2014.02.003

Rives, L.M., & Bañón, A.R. (2008). La responsabilidad social corporativa como determinante del éxito competitivo: Un análisis empírico. Revista europea de dirección y economía de la empresa, 17(3), 27-42.

Rodríguez Gutiérrez, P., Fuentes García, F.J., & Sánchez Cañizares, S. (2013). Revelación de información sobre clientes, comunidad, empleados y medio ambiente en las entidades financieras españolas a través de las memorias de responsabilidad social corporativa (2007-2010). Investigaciones Europeas de Dirección y Economía de la Empresa, 19(3), 180-187. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.iedee.2012.12.002

Roldán, J.L., & Sánchez-Franco, M.J. (2012). Variance-Based Structural Equation Modeling: Guidelines for Using Partial Least Squares. Research methodologies, innovations and philosophies in software systems engineering and information systems, 193-221. https:/doi.org/10.4018/978-1-4666-0179-6.ch010

Serrano‐Cinca, C., Fuertes‐Callén, Y., & Gutiérrez‐Nieto, B. (2007). Online reporting by banks: A structural modelling approach. Online Information Review, 31(3), 310-332.  https:/doi.org/10.1108/14684520710764096

Simon, A., Karapetrovic, S., & Casadesús, M. (2012). Difficulties and benefits of integrated management systems. Industrial Management & Data Systems, 112(5), 828-846. https:/doi.org/10.1108/02635571211232406

Spence, L.J. (2007). CSR and Small Business in a European Policy Context: The Five “C”s of CSR and Small Business Research Agenda 2007. Business and Society Review, 112(4), 533-552. https:/doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8594.2007.00308.x

Suñe, A., Bravo, E., Mundet, J., & Herrera, L. (2012). Buenas prácticas de innovación: Un estudio exploratorio de empresas tecnológicas en el sector audiovisual español. Investigaciones Europeas de Dirección y Economía de la Empresa, 18(2), 139-147. https:/doi.org/10.1016/S1135-2523(12)70004-7

Swanson, L.A., & Zhang, D.D. (2012). Perspectives on corporate responsibility and sustainable development. Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, 23(6), 630-639.  https:/doi.org/10.1108/14777831211262918

Tenenhaus, M., Vinzi, V.E., Chatelin, Y.M., & Lauro, C. (2005). PLS path modeling. Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, 48(1), 159-205. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.csda.2004.03.005

Turyakira, P., Venter, E., & Smith, E. (2014). The impact of corporate social responsibility factors on the competitiveness of small and medium-sized enterprises. South African Journal of Economic and Management Sciences, 17(2), 157-172.

Van Beurden, P., & Gössling, T. (2008). The Worth of Values - A Literature Review on the Relation Between Corporate Social and Financial Performance. Journal of Business Ethics, 82(2), 407-424. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-008-9894-x

Vásquez-Urriago, Á.R., Barge-Gil, A., & Rico, A.M. (2012). Los parques científicos y tecnológicos españoles, impulsores de la cooperación en innovación. ICE: Revista de Economía, 869, 99-114.

Vásquez-Urriago, Á.R., Barge-Gil, A., Rico, A.M., & Paraskevopoulou, E. (2014). The impact of science and technology parks on firms’ product innovation: empirical evidence from Spain. Journal of Evolutionary Economics, 24, 835-873. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s00191-013-0337-1

Vázquez, D.G., & Sánchez, M.I. (2013). Análisis de la incidencia de la responsabilidad social empresarial en el éxito competitivo de las microempresas y el papel de la innovación. Universia Business Review, 38, 14-31.

Vázquez-Carrasco, R., & López-Pérez, M.E. (2013). Small & medium-sized enterprises and Corporate Social Responsibility: A systematic review of the literature. Quality & Quantity, 47(6), 3205-3218. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s11135-012-9713-4

Vidales, K.B.V., & Ortiz, D.A.A. (2014). Responsabilidad social de las empresas agrícolas y agroindustriales aguacateras de Uruapan, Michoacán, y sus implicaciones en la competitividad. Contaduría y Administración, 59(4), 223-251. https:/doi.org/10.1016/S0186-1042(14)70161-5

Vilanova, M., Lozano, J.M., & Arenas, D. (2009). Exploring the Nature of the Relationship Between CSR and Competitiveness. Journal of Business Ethics, 87(S1), 57-69. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-008-9812-2

Vintró, C., Fortuny, J., Sanmiquel, L., Freijo, M., & Edo, J. (2012). Is corporate social responsibility possible in the mining sector? Evidence from Catalan companies. Resources Policy, 37(1), 118-125. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.resourpol.2011.10.003

Vinzi, V.E., Chin, W.W., Henseler, J., & Wang, H. (2010). Handbook of Partial Least Squares: Concepts, Methods and Applications. Springer Science & Business Media. Berlin: Springer.

Von Ahsen, A. (2014). The Integration of Quality, Environmental and Health and Safety Management by Car Manufacturers – a Long-Term Empirical Study. Business Strategy and the Environment, 23(6), 395-416. https:/doi.org/10.1002/bse.1791

Waddock, S. (2004). Parallel Universes: Companies, Academics, and the Progress of Corporate Citizenship. Business and Society Review, 109(1), 5-42. https:/doi.org/10.1111/j.0045-3609.2004.00002.x

Wang, Y., Chen, Y., & Benitez-Amado, J. (2015). How information technology influences environmental performance: Empirical evidence from China. International Journal of Information Management, 35(2), 160-170. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.ijinfomgt.2014.11.005

 




Versión en español

tulo: RSC y empresas tecnológicas: Un estudio sobre su implantación e integración y efectos sobre la competitividad de las empresas

Resumen

Objeto: Se propone un modelo de ecuaciones estructurales para explicar las motivaciones de implantar medidas de Responsabilidad Social Corporativa (RSC) en empresas tecnológicas españolas y cómo influyen en la integración de la RSC la presencia de sistemas de gestión normalizados previos a la implantación de dichas medidas. Asimismo, se estudia si la RSC tiene influencia en la competitividad de dichas empresas.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque: El estudio se llevo a cabo en empresas ubicadas en Parques Científicos y Tecnológicos españoles, mediante una encuesta y aplicando las ecuaciones estructurales como herramienta estadística.

Aportaciones y resultados: Los resultados del modelo revelan que existe una relación positiva, directa y estadísticamente significativa entre las motivaciones para la RSC, los sistemas de gestión previos, la implantación de medidas de RSC y la integración real de la RSC en la organización.

Limitaciones: Se encuentran determinadas por la técnica utilizada para el modelo propuesto: ecuaciones estructurales, pues estas asumen una linealidad de las relaciones entre las variables latentes.

Implicaciones prácticas: Las empresas pueden utilizar los resultados de este estudio como un punto de apoyo para potenciar la integración de la RSC basándose en sistemas de gestión previos y aprovechar las sinergias creadas entre ellos, pues la integración de la RSC tiene una relación directa con la competitividad de la empresa.

Originalidad / Valor añadido: Se demuestra la vinculación entre las motivaciones de la RSC, las acciones de RSC y su integración en las empresas tecnológicas de manera empírica y fiable.

Palabras clave: Responsabilidad Social Corporativa, Motivaciones, Empresas tecnológicas, Integración, Ecuaciones estructurales

Códigos JEL: M14

 

1. Introducción

Si algo caracteriza el entorno empresarial en los últimos años ha sido la aguda crisis económica sufrida, la cual no puede ser atribuida meramente a un cambio de ciclo económico sino también a la ausencia de valores y principios éticos en el funcionamiento de las organizaciones (Melé, Argandoña & Sánchez-Runde, 2011). Por ello, una salida a la crisis puede venir de la mano de innovaciones sociales (Goldsmith, 2010) y la Responsabilidad Social Corporativa (RSC) es considerada una innovación en la gestión de empresas y como tal puede alcanzar su máximo valor estratégico e incluso hay organizaciones que creen que la RSC protege contra los efectos negativos de la crisis económica (Janssen, Sen & Bhattacharya, 2015). En este contexto, el estudio clásico de la RSC se han ampliado al marco de la crisis económica (Pérez & del Bosque, 2012) y su gestión efectiva puede ayudar a las organizaciones a minimizar los impactos negativos de la recesión.

Por otro lado, las organizaciones están constantemente adaptándose a los cambios económicos con la intención de tener mayores posibilidades de supervivencia en el mercado. Un factor clave para ello es la innovación (Bernardo, 2014). Damanpour y Gopalakrishnan (2001) la conceptualizan como “la adopción de una idea o un nuevo comportamiento en la organización”. la RSC contribuye y fomenta la innovación de tres maneras:

  • la innovación que resulta del diálogo con los diferentes grupos de interés tanto internos como externos a la empresa,

  • la identificación de nuevas oportunidades de negocio derivadas de las demandas sociales y medioambientales en productos y procesos más eficientes o en nuevas formas de negocio dirigidas a la denominada base de la pirámide, formada por las personas con menos recursos (Prahalad & Ramaswamy, 2004) y

  • la creación de mejores lugares y formas de trabajar que favorecen la innovación y la creatividad, como las basadas en mayor participación de los empleados y más confianza en ellos (Benito Hernández & Esteban Sánchez, 2012).

Por ello, las empresas, deben adoptar prácticas formalizadas de RSC y, por tanto, establecer aquellos procedimientos y herramientas que estén alineadas con su estrategia corporativa (Bocquet, Le Bas, Mothe & Poussing, 2013). Tal es así, que existen estudios que afirman que la RSC tiene una contribución significativamente positiva en la competitividad nacional e incluso en los niveles de calidad de vida (Boulouta & Pitelis, 2014). Dicho en otras palabras, cabe esperar que la innovación aumente cuando la empresa es responsable y ese incremento de la innovación se traduce en mayor éxito competitivo, potenciando el efecto que por sí misma ya ejercía la RSC en la competitividad de la empresa (Vázquez & Sánchez, 2013), ya que siguiendo a Vilanova, Lozano y Arenas (2009) si la RSC está integrada en los procesos de negocio genera prácticas innovadoras y, por tanto, una mejora de la competitividad y además esta integración puede ser facilitada por procesos de gestión normalizados previamente implantados.

La RSC se ha convertido en un factor cada vez más importante para la competitividad percibida de las empresas (Turyakira, Venter & Smith, 2014). La competitividad es un concepto multidimensional que se refiere a la capacidad de crear ventajas competitivas sostenibles que se puede utilizar tanto a nivel nacional, como a nivel de las empresas (Vilanova et al., 2009). Así pues, el efecto de la RSC sobre el éxito competitivo, entendiendo por éxito la obtención de unos resultados positivos para la empresa en términos de posicionamiento en el mercado y que van más allá del ámbito financiero (Vázquez & Sánchez, 2013), es mayor en aquellos sectores con alta competitividad (como el sector tecnológico) y que siguen una estrategia proactiva versus reactiva (Marín, Rubio & De Maya, 2012), en los que la RSC supone una ventaja competitiva, mientras que es menor en sectores poco competitivos, en los que las empresas siguen diferenciándose ofreciendo ventajas tradicionales de marca, precio, calidad y distribución (Rives & Bañón, 2008).

En la actualidad, existe un número creciente de empresas españolas que creen que deben contribuir al desarrollo sostenible mediante la planificación de sus operaciones con el fin de favorecer el crecimiento económico y el aumento de su productividad y competitividad garantizando al mismo tiempo la protección del medio ambiente y fomentar la responsabilidad social, y cumpliendo así con los intereses generales (Prado-Lorenzo, Gallego-Álvarez, García-Sánchez & Rodríguez-Domínguez, 2008) de la sociedad, pues la inversión en iniciativas de RSC puede ser una de las fuentes de ventajas competitivas (Apospori, Zografos & Magrizos, 2012) y una manera de mejorar el rendimiento económico de las empresas (Hur, Kim & Woo, 2014).

Siendo conscientes de todas estas situaciones, el objetivo de este artículo es:

  • investigar las motivaciones de las empresas tecnológicas para tomar parte de las iniciativas de RSC e implantar actividades y políticas en su seno - practicas de RSC que crean innovaciones en los procesos (Benito Hernández & Esteban Sánchez, 2012) -, integrándolas en el sistema de gestión propio de cualquier organización y

  • analizar los factores facilitadores de la implantación e integración de la RSC en el seno de la organización y

  • la influencia directa de la integración de la RSC en la competitividad de la empresa tecnológica.



2. Revisión de la literatura

Académicamente, la Responsabilidad Social (RS) se utiliza a menudo como un término general para describir una variedad de cuestiones relacionadas con las responsabilidades de las empresas (Hillenbrand, Money & Ghobadian, 2013). Waddock (2004), por ejemplo, define RS como "el grado de (ir)responsabilidad manifiesta en las estrategias y prácticas de operaciones de una empresa, ya que afectan a grupos de interés y al entorno natural en el día a día". Sin embargo, no existe una definición universalmente aceptada sobre la RSC (Dahlsrud, 2008), aunque se puede afirmar que la RSC es, además del cumplimiento estricto de las obligaciones legales vigentes, la integración voluntaria en el gobierno y gestión, en la estrategia, políticas y procedimientos, de las preocupaciones sociales, laborales, medioambientales y de respeto a los derechos humanos que surgen de la relación y el diálogo transparente con sus grupos de interés, responsabilizándose así de las consecuencias y los impactos que se derivan de las acciones de una organización (Mendoza, De Nieves & Briones, 2010).

Por otro lado, una gran parte de la literatura de RSC se ha centrado en el impacto de la RSC en el nivel de la competitividad de las empresas (Boulouta & Pitelis, 2014), tanto grandes como pequeñas y en diferentes sectores (Battaglia, Testa, Bianchi, Iraldo & Frey, 2014; Vidales & Ortiz, 2014), sin embargo no se ha encontrado ningún estudio sobre su influencia sobre la competitividad de las empresas tecnológicas, por lo que en los siguientes apartados se realizara dicha revisión y se propondrán las hipótesis de este artículo.



2.1. RSC y sector tecnológico español

En la literatura científica existen numerosos estudios sobre la RSC tanto en grandes empresas (Melé, Debeljuh & Arruda, 2006), como en pequeñas (p.e: Baumann-Pauly, Wickert, Spence & Scherer, 2013; Vázquez-Carrasco & López-Pérez, 2013; Herrera, Larrán & Martínez-Martínez, 2013), en diferentes sectores p.e. Sector financiero (Pérez Ruiz & Rodríguez del Bosque, 2012) y Bancos (Alcaraz & Rodenas, 2013); Martínez-Campillo, Cabeza-García & Marbella-Sánchez, 2013), energético (Moseñe, Burritt, Sanagustín, Moneva & Tingey-Holyoak, 2013) y en la Administración Pública (Bernal Conesa, De Nieves Nieto & Briones Peñalver, 2014; García-Sánchez, Frías-Aceituno & Rodríguez-Domínguez, 2013) e incluso alguno que hace referencia a empresas del sector tecnológico (Guadamillas-Gómez, Donate-Manzanares & Skerlavaj, 2010); las posibles motivaciones de adoptar la RSC (Prado-Lorenzo et al., 2008; Graafland & Schouten, 2012), y su integración con otros sistemas de gestión de la empresa (Bernardo, 2014; Von Ahsen, 2014; Castka & Balzarova, 2008); sin embargo, no se han encontrado estudios sobre RSC, sus motivaciones e integración en empresas tecnológicas, las cuales son fuente constante de innovación, tanto en procesos como en productos, por tanto, se considera escasa la información sobre el sector tecnológico, denotando que no han sido analizadas en profundidad las motivaciones de la RSC y su integración en el sistema de gestión de la empresa tecnológica, por ello se estima interesante profundizar en el estudio de la misma en empresas tecnológicas españolas, ya que investigaciones previas han demostrado que las organizaciones con una orientación estratégica hacia la innovación apuestan por mejorar sus capacidades organizativas internas para ser más competitivas en un entorno global (Suñe, Bravo, Mundet & Herrera, 2012). De hecho para fomentar las innovaciones de producto y proceso, las empresas deben adoptar prácticas formalizadas de RSC pues ésta tiene una contribución positiva en la competitividad (Boulouta & Pitelis, 2014).

En la literatura científica se establecen cuatro maneras destacables a través del cual la RSC puede crear ventajas competitivas (Hockerts, 2015). Estas son:

  • la reducción del riesgo,

  • las ganancias de eficiencia,

  • la reputación social y

  • la creación de nuevos mercados.

Diversos autores (Perrini, Russo & Tencati, 2007; Spence, 2007) han señalado el sector como uno de los elementos que inciden sobre la cultura organizativa a la hora de adoptar e integrar las prácticas de RSC en los planes estratégicos de las organizaciones. Así, por ejemplo, Perrini et al. (2007) encontraron que las empresas del sector de las Tecnologías de la Información y la Comunicación (TIC) se encontraban más dispuestas a controlar e informar sobre sus comportamientos de RSC mientras que las empresas manufactureras se interesaban más por motivar a sus empleados a través de actividades de voluntariado en la comunidad.

En un estudio realizado por Lorenzo, Sánchez and Álvarez (2009) se establece que el hecho de pertenecer al sector de la tecnología y las telecomunicaciones tienen un efecto positivo aunque no significativo en la divulgación de acciones de RSC.

En determinados sectores tecnológicos los períodos de desarrollo de productos son extremadamente largos y las empresas suelen presentar resultados negativos en los primeros años de vida, presentado mayores dificultades de financiación. En estos casos, los indicadores financieros no son efectivos para valorar el potencial de las empresas, siendo más adecuados los activos intangibles y los basados en el conocimiento (Quintana García, Benavides Velasco & Guzmán Parra, 2013).

Entre estos activos intangibles podemos encontrar la RSC (Lindgreen, Antioco, Palmer & Heesch, 2009) la cual como demuestran algunos estudios tiene una relación positiva con los beneficios financieros (Hammann, Habisch & Pechlaner, 2009).

Además, la actividad desarrollada por una empresa tiene un alto impacto social cuando ésta opera en el sector de las tecnologías de la información y las telecomunicaciones (Luna Sotorrío & Fernández Sánchez, 2010).

Es por ello que se va a investigar y analizar la situación de las empresas tecnológicas españolas frente a la RSC, tomando como punto de partida las ubicadas en parques científicos y tecnológicos españoles pues en ellos hay una mayor presencia de empresas de alta tecnología (Vásquez-Urriago, Barge-Gil & Rico, 2012).

Las empresas ubicadas en los parques tecnológicos muestran un mayor esfuerzo en innovación y valoran más los obstáculos a la innovación (Vásquez-Urriago, Barge-Gil, Rico & Paraskevopoulou, 2014) y se aprecia un nivel de cooperación significativamente mayor en el caso de estas empresas (Vásquez-Urriago et al., 2012).

El concepto de parque científico se originó a finales de 1950 en el contexto universitario estadounidense (Jimenez-Zarco, Cerdan-Chiscano & Torrent-Sellens, 2013). El éxito de parques tecnológicos como el de Silicon Valley en California o el de Cambridge en Reino Unido ha influido para reproducir el modelo en otros países (Ratinho & Henriques, 2010).

En España, los primeros parques surgieron a mediados de la década de 1980, siguiendo una estrategia de atracción de empresas de alta tecnología (Jiménez-Zarco et al., 2013) con el objetivo de contribuir al crecimiento económico y empresarial en el ámbito local o regional.

En 1988 se crea la Asociación de Parques Científicos y Tecnológicos de España (APTE) con el objetivo de convertir a los parques científicos y tecnológicos en piezas claves del sistema de innovación español. APTE se ocupa de poner en contacto al mundo científico de dentro y fuera de los parques con el tejido empresarial de los parques para la creación y transferencia de conocimiento, mediante configuración de sistemas regionales de innovación (Jiménez-Zarco et al., 2013), es por ello que España constituye un caso interesante dentro de los parques científicos a diferencia de otros establecidos en Estados Unidos o Reino Unido (Vásquez-Urriago et al., 2014).

Actualmente existen 68 parques científicos y tecnológicos asociados a APTE y en ellos se acogen a empresas de origen, naturaleza e intereses distintos: spin-offs académicas de Base Tecnológica (EBT), Empresas de Base de Conocimiento (EBC) y start-ups (Jimenez-Zarco et al., 2013).

Albahari, Catalano y Landoni (2013) demuestran cómo algunos parques contribuyen de forma importante al desarrollo regional, en términos económicos y sociales, ya que favorecen el desarrollo de una industria especializada e innovadora, y crear el germen para la creación de un cluster industrial.

Los parques tecnológicos tienen en común la creación de empresas tecnológicas o atraer a empresas ya consolidadas para fomentar el desarrollo regional a través de un enfoque tecnológico y la creación de empleo y bienestar (Ratinho & Henriques, 2010; Jimenez-Zarco et al., 2013), por tanto los parques tecnológicos estarían directamente relacionados con dos de las tres dimensiones de la RSC (la económica y la social) y generarían una red de cooperación entre empresas tecnológicas, lo cual puede aumentar la capacidad de general conocimiento y ampliar positivamente las relaciones con los agentes propios del negocio, si a ello además le unimos la adopción de políticas de RSC, esto va a permitir una mayor flexibilidad y oportunidades para abordar problemas sociales con productos o servicios innovadores, incrementar la capacidad de atraer, retener y motivar al personal y acceder a nuevos conocimientos e información, con lo que las empresas pueden aumentar su desempeño y competitividad (Benito Hernández & Esteban Sánchez, 2012).

Estar ubicado en un parque tecnológico tiene efectos positivos en la innovación de productos e incrementa las probabilidades de ser innovador entre un 10% y 20%, y aumenta las ventas debido a nuevos productos alrededor de un 32% (Vásquez-Urriago et al., 2014).

Además las empresas pertenecientes a los parques son en promedio de menor tamaño, tienen una mayor vocación exportadora, pertenecen más frecuentemente a un grupo de empresas, son en mayor proporción de reciente creación y tienen una disminución menos frecuente de la cifra de negocios por venta o cierre de la empresa (Vásquez-Urriago et al., 2012).

2.2. Motivaciones de la RSC y su integración

A pesar de la dificultad de aportar una definición de RSC (Dahlsrud, 2008), la idea general que se extrae de todas ellas es que la RSC supone que las empresas deben llevar a cabo sus negocios de manera que demuestren consideración para el más amplio entorno social con el fin de servir de manera constructiva a las necesidades de la sociedad.

 

2.2.1. Motivaciones para la implantación de la RSC

Las motivaciones para la puesta en práctica de la RSC han sido estudiadas de forma general (Graafland & Schouten, 2012) y en diferentes países (Prado-Lorenzo et al., 2008; Prajogo, Tang & Lai, 2012) y sectores, encontrándose dos tipos diferentes de motivaciones principales: las externas o extrínsecas a la organización, entre ellas destacan las de carácter financiero o económico que tienen relación con el beneficio (Graafland & Schouten, 2012) y las internas o intrínsecas a la organización, que no solo tienen que ver con el beneficio de la organización sino también con los valores y creencias del personal que conforman las organizaciones (Graafland & Schouten, 2012).

2.2.2. Integración de la RSC en la organización

En referencia a la integración de la RSC en las empresas la literatura revela que muy pocas empresas la tienen integrada de manera efectiva (Bernardo, Casadesus, Karapetrovic & Heras, 2012; Karapetrovic & Casadesús, 2009), a pesar de los beneficios que aporta dicha integración (Bernardo, Simon, Tarí & Molina-Azorín, 2015; Simon, Karapetrovic & Casadesús, 2012).

Por ello, el presente estudio parte de la existencia de diferentes motivaciones para la RSC, pero queriendo detectar cuales son éstas para las empresas tecnológicas, si existen “agentes facilitadores” de su integración y si a través de esta integración de la RSC se contribuye de manera significativa a la competitividad de la empresa.

 

3. Modelo conceptual e hipótesis

En base a los apartados anteriores y analizando los trabajos previos en ellos citados referentes a la existencia de diferentes motivaciones para adoptar una estrategia de RSC en las empresas y su influencia en ella, el presente apartado trata de centrarse en cuáles son estas motivaciones para la RSC en las empresas tecnológicas españolas y como una vez detectadas se puede facilitar una estrategia proactiva en materia de RSC, proponiendo las siguientes hipótesis de investigación:

H1: Existen diferentes motivaciones para adoptar medidas de RSC que faciliten la implantación definitiva de la RSC en la empresa tecnológica.

H2: (a) la existencia de sistemas de gestión normalizados -de Calidad (Q), Medioambiente (MA) y/o Seguridad y Salud Laboral (SST)- previos a la adopción de medias de RSC facilitan la implantación de la RSC y (b) ayudan (median) a su integración real en la organización.

H3: La integración de RSC de la empresa se verá afectada de manera directa y positivamente por la facilidad de implantación de las medidas de RSC.

H4: La integración de la RSC en la estrategia de la organización tiene una influencia positiva en la competitividad de la empresa tecnológica.

Estas hipótesis están resumidas en el modelo conceptual reflejado en la Figura 1.

 

 

Figura 1. Modelo conceptual de hipótesis

 

4. Metodología

Existe una gran variedad de métodos para la agregación de datos existentes en las ciencias sociales (Rodríguez Gutiérrez, Fuentes García & Sánchez Cañizares, 2013), sin embargo éstos no se aplican de manera general en el campo de la investigación de la RSC. Uno de los métodos más ampliamente utilizado es el análisis factorial, principalmente en trabajos cuya base de estudio se basa en encuestas (Rodríguez Gutiérrez et al., 2013).

Para la recogida de datos, se enviaron un total de 489 invitaciones mediante email para el acceso al link del cuestionario, siendo 98 empresas las que cumplimentaron el cuestionario, lo que supone una tasa de respuestas de un 20.04%. En el caso de encuestas usando herramientas web que incluye un link de acceso al cuestionario, la tasa de respuesta se encuentra en torno al 30% (Arevalo, Aravind, Ayuso & Roca, 2013) aunque hay estudios empíricos con una tasa de respuesta válida entre el 10% y el 20% (Ramos, Manzanares & Gómez, 2014; Chow & Chen, 2012; Homburg & Stebel, 2009).

Para la elaboración de este estudio se diseñó un cuestionario especifico, utilizando la escala Likert 1-5 (1 «totalmente en desacuerdo» y 5 «totalmente de acuerdo»), debido a que un gran número de preguntas hacen referencia a cuestiones que no pueden ser cuantificadas con un valor concreto (ejemplo: Implantar medidas de RSC para aumentar la motivación del empleado). En general, el cuestionario incluía preguntas relacionadas con las motivaciones de implementación de la RSC, la integración con otros sistemas de gestión, su facilidad de integración, la adopción de una estrategia de RSC y los grupos de interés para la organización, en línea con otros estudios (Vázquez & Sánchez, 2013; Prajogo et al., 2012; De Godos Díez, Fernández Gago & Cabeza García, 2012; Law & Gunasekaran, 2012; Díez & Gago, 2011).

Para la realización del análisis se ha recurrido, en este trabajo, a un modelo de ecuaciones estructurales (SEM). Los modelos de ecuaciones estructurales son procedimientos estadísticos que permiten comprobar la medida de las hipótesis funcionales, predictivas y causales, siendo estas herramientas estadísticas multivariantes esenciales para entender muchos elementos de investigación y llevar a cabo investigación básica o aplicada en las ciencias del comportamiento, de gestión, de salud y sociales (Bagozzi & Yi, 2011).

En los modelos de ecuaciones estructurales tal y como afirman Vázquez y Sánchez (2013), se asumen relaciones más complejas (con efectos directos e indirectos) al tiempo que se trabaja con variables latentes (no observables directamente y que deben medirse a través de indicadores), llamados constructos, lo que diferencia a estos modelos con los modelos clásicos de regresión multivariante.

Para la formación de los constructos se ha recurrido a los siguientes indicadores, basados en la literatura consultada (Battaglia et al., 2014; Gallardo-Vázquez & Sanchez-Hernandez, 2014; Turyakira et al., 2014; Asif, Searcy, Zutshi & Fisscher, 2013; Asif, Searcy, Zutshi & Ahmad, 2011; Lee, Park & Lee, 2013):

 

Motivaciones

Internas

MO1

Mejorar las condiciones laborales de mis trabajadores

MO2

Reducir el absentismo laboral

MO3

Aumentar la motivación de los empleados

MO4

Mejorar las formación y capacitación de los empleados

MO5

Mejorar la eficacia y el control de las operaciones

MO6

Construir sinergias entre los sistemas de gestión

Externas

MO7

Cumplir con leyes y políticas gubernamentales

MO8

Cumplir  indicaciones de: clientes, accionistas, grupos ecologistas,…

MO9

Mejorar las relaciones con la comunidad donde está asentada la organización

MO10

Salvaguardar los derechos de los consumidores

MO11

Reducir las reclamaciones de los clientes

MO12

Proteger al medioambiente

MO13

Favorecer el desarrollo sostenible

MO14

Mejorar la imagen de la empresa al coincidir con acciones de la competencia

MO15

Ser homologado como proveedor de organismos  públicos

MO16

Ser homologado como proveedor de organismos  privados

MO17

Reducir las sanciones de organismos públicos

MO18

Obtener ayudas o subvenciones de organismos públicos

MO19

Cumplir con requisitos de terceras partes, p.e. administración, entidades financieras, etc.

Implantacion

Im1

Existe un conocimiento previo sobre las dificultades de implantación

Im2

Existen ventajas de tener un sistema de gestión normalizado, p.e, estandarización de procesos, formación del personal

Im3

Se conocen los procesos de auditoría interna y externa para la certificación

Im4

Se conocen los requisitos de los diferentes sistemas, (p.e. cumplimento legal, revisión por la dirección, auditorias, indicadores…)

Im5

Surgen sinergias entre los sistemas (comparten recursos, documentación común, etc.)

Integración

Int1

Comparten recursos

Int2

Comparten procedimientos documentados

Int3

Comparten requisitos

Int4

Se unifica el manual de gestión

Int5

Comparten personal

Sistemas De Gestion Previos

SGP1

Existe un departamento de gestión encargado de todo

SGP2

Los trabajadores conocen los sistemas de gestión y los aplican diariamente sin dificultades

SGP3

Los sistemas certificados son en sí el sistema de gestión de la organización y por tanto el certificado no es una cuestión de imagen

Competitividad

COM1

Se logra un aumento de las ventas

COM2

Se produce un ahorro en costes

COM3

Mejora el acceso a la financiación

COM4

Crecen los ingresos

COM5

Mejora la imagen de la empresa o marca

COM6

Se produce un acceso a nuevos mercados o clientes

COM7

Se obtienen ventajas competitivas

COM8

Mejora el retorno de la inversión

COM9

Mejora la satisfacción de los clientes

COM10

Se obtienen colaboraciones con otras organizaciones

COM11

Aumenta la rentabilidad económica

COM12

Aumenta la rentabilidad financiera

COM13

Se consigue una reducción del absentismo laboral

COM14

Incrementa de la satisfacción de los empleados

COM15

Reducción de la conflictividad laboral por asuntos sociales

COM16

Se facilita la conciliación de la vida laboral y familiar

COM17

Existe participación de los empleados en los procesos de toma de decisiones

COM18

Aumenta la inversión en RRHH, p.e. con acciones formativas, plan de carrera…

COM19

Aumenta la igualdad de oportunidades en el trabajo, p.e. empleo de personas discapacitadas, promoción de mujeres a posiciones directivas

COM20

Reducción del número de accidentes laborales

COM21

Mejora la seguridad y salud laboral

COM22

Se mejora la imagen externa de la organización

COM23

Se mejora la imagen interna de la organización

COM24

Se favorece la motivación de los empleados

COM25

Se demuestra liderazgo en la comunidad

COM26

Se mejoran las relaciones con la comunidad

COM27

Se patrocinan acciones culturales y deportivas de la comunidad

COM28

Se participa en otras acciones públicas de manera positiva

COM29

Se enfatizan los derechos de los consumidores

Tabla1. Indicadores. Nota: Indicadores en negrita son aquellos que fueron validados en este estudio para las diferentes escalas de los constructos

 

Los modelos de ecuaciones estructurales incluyen dos niveles de análisis (el modelo de medida y el modelo estructural ) (Hair Jr, Sarstedt, Hopkins & Kuppelwieser, 2014). En el análisis del modelo de medida se verifica cómo los constructos hipotéticos se miden en términos de las variables observadas (indicadores) y se basa en el cálculo de los componentes principales. El modelo estructural examina las relaciones entre los constructos (Chen & Chang, 2011). En definitiva el modelo estructural trata de realizar un análisis similar al de la regresión pero con poder explicativo (Vázquez & Sánchez, 2013), estudiando los efectos directos e indirectos del conjunto de los constructos.

4.1. Análisis estadísticos

La técnica elegida dentro de SEM es la conocida como Partial Least Squares (PLS), por diferentes razones pues:

  • se ha utilizado previamente en las investigaciones relacionadas con la tecnología (Wang, Chen & Benitez-Amado, 2015; Chen & Chang, 2011; Pavlou & El Sawy, 2006);

  • el uso de PLS se ha recomendado cuando el conocimiento teórico sobre un tema es escaso (Hair Jr et al., 2014) como es el caso (RSC y empresas tecnologías) y además PLS es más adecuado para aplicaciones causales y de construcción de teorías (análisis exploratorio) (Roldán & Sánchez-Franco, 2012; Henseler et al., 2014) aunque también puede ser utilizado para la confirmación de dichas teorías (análisis confirmatorio) a través de la bondad de ajuste del modelo estructural (Dijkstra & Henseler, 2015),

  • PLS puede estimar modelos con indicadores reflexivos y formativos sin ningún problema de identificación (Vinzi, Chin, Henseler & Wang, 2010) porque trabaja con compuestos ponderados en lugar de factores (Gefen, Rigdon & Straub, 2011);

  • PLS puede estimar modelos con muestras pequeñas, de hecho, los algoritmos de modelado de PLS tienden a obtener resultados con altos niveles de potencia estadística (Reinartz, Haenlein & Henseler, 2009), incluso cuando el tamaño de la muestra es muy modesto (Rigdon, 2014). Por lo tanto, y siguiendo a Henseler et al. (2014) utilizamos PLS como un instrumento estadístico destacable para la gestión y la investigación de las organizaciones.

El software utilizado fue SmartPLS 2.0 M3, desarrollado por Ringle, Wende y Will en 2005. Dado que SmartPLS es un modelo de estimación y análisis SEM, utiliza el proceso de estimación en dos pasos, evaluando el modelo de medida y el modelo estructural (Hair Jr et al., 2014). En primer lugar, se estima el modelo de medida, donde se determina la relación entre los indicadores y el constructo (Roldán & Sánchez-Franco, 2012) y en segundo lugar, se realiza la estimación del modelo estructural, donde se evalúan las relaciones entre los diferentes constructos, a través de los coeficientes path, su nivel de significación (R2 Coefficent of determination) y la redundancia validada cruzada (Q2 Cross-validated redundancy) (Hair Jr et al., 2014).

Esta secuencia asegura que tenemos los indicadores adecuados de los constructos antes de tratar de llegar a conclusiones sobre las relaciones incluidas en el modelo interno o estructural (Roldán & Sánchez-Franco, 2012).

 

4.1.1. Análisis del modelo de medida

En el modelo de medida se definen los constructos (variables latentes) que van a ser utilizados en el modelo asignándole indicadores a cada uno, por tanto, se contemplan las relaciones entre cada constructo y sus indicadores basándose en el cálculo de los componentes principales. En los modelos de medición reflexivos, este análisis se lleva a cabo con referencia a los atributos de fiabilidad individual del indicador, la fiabilidad del constructo, la validez convergente (Fornell & Larcker, 1981; Tenenhaus, Vinzi, Chatelin & Lauro, 2005) y la validez discriminante (Hair, Sarstedt, Ringle & Mena, 2012).

La fiabilidad de cada elemento individual se evalúa mediante el análisis del factor de cargas estandarizadas (λ), o correlaciones simples de los indicadores con su respectivo constructo (Hair Jr et al., 2014). La fiabilidad del elemento individual es considerado adecuado cuando un indicador tiene un λ mayor que 0.707 en su respectivo constructo (Carmines & Zeller, 1979). En este estudio, todos los indicadores reflexivos tienen cargas por encima de 0.710 (cifras en negrita en la Tabla 2).

 

Indicador

Motivaciones

Implantación

Integración

SG Previos

competitividad

MO7

0.786

0.403

0.215

0.230

0.144

MO11

0.712

0.225

0.321

0.292

0.208

MO14

0.732

0.382

0.346

0.336

0.155

MO15

0.822

0.279

0.325

0.251

0.343

MO16

0.848

0.352

0.345

0.339

0.304

MO17

0.831

0.251

0.280

0.251

0.186

MO19

0.867

0.349

0.364

0.256

0.398

Im1

0.350

0.811

0.563

0.542

0.318

Im2

0.258

0.710

0.409

0.397

0.119

Im3

0.301

0.898

0.602

0.565

0.293

Im4

0.434

0.930

0.704

0.603

0.326

Im5

0.399

0.897

0.710

0.499

0.330

Int1

0.353

0.632

0.901

0.653

0.381

Int2

0.411

0.721

0.932

0.682

0.364

Int3

0.362

0.698

0.902

0.663

0.288

Int4

0.398

0.642

0.923

0.715

0.252

Int5

0.188

0.448

0.765

0.640

0.387

SGP1

0.332

0.480

0.742

0.892

0.465

SGP2

0.366

0.534

0.637

0.879

0.413

SGP3

0.249

0.640

0.654

0.917

0.344

COM6

0.346

0.344

0.411

0.425

0.813

COM7

0.242

0.274

0.207

0.287

0.837

COM8

0.344

0.246

0.208

0.274

0.794

COM11

0.246

0.202

0.257

0.325

0.816

COM12

0.250

0.218

0.302

0.372

0.744

COM13

0.395

0.256

0.252

0.344

0.798

COM14

0.150

0.241

0.270

0.397

0.880

COM15

0.231

0.315

0.375

0.510

0.858

COM16

0.142

0.423

0.380

0.498

0.774

COM17

0.206

0.361

0.453

0.525

0.841

COM18

0.270

0.335

0.253

0.315

0.882

COM20

0.292

0.268

0.277

0.272

0.841

COM21

0.341

0.268

0.254

0.238

0.835

COM23

0.154

0.078

0.138

0.269

0.752

COM24

0.179

0.233

0.259

0.250

0.882

COM25

0.274

0.096

0.302

0.317

0.783

Tabla 2. Cargas factoriales y cargas cruzadas para el modelo de medida

 

En los modelos de medida con indicadores reflexivos, se debe obtener la fiabilidad compuesta (rc) (Hair Jr et al., 2014) y el α de Cronbach (Castro & Roldán, 2013) para evaluar la consistencia interna de los constructos, es decir, su fiabilidad. Se interpretan ambos valores con las directrices que ofrecieron Nunnally y Bernstein (1994) los cuales sugieren un valor de 0.7 como punto de referencia para una fiabilidad modesta aplicable en las primeras etapas de investigación. En la presente investigación, los cinco constructos analizados tienen una alta consistencia interna pues se superan los niveles recomendados, ya que, para la fiabilidad compuesta, incluso se supera el umbral más restrictivo propuesto por Nunnally y Bernstein (1994) de 0.8 (ver Tabla 3).

Para valorar la validez convergente se calcula la varianza media extraída (AVE), la cual deber ser al menos igual a 0.5 (Fornell & Larcker, 1981) y es equivalente a la comunalidad de un constructo (Hair Jr et al., 2014), por lo que un AVE de 0.5 demuestra que el constructo explica más de la mitad de la varianza de sus indicadores.

Por su parte, la validez discriminante representa el grado en que el constructo es empíricamente distinto de otros constructos o, en otras palabras, el constructo mide lo que realmente pretende. Dicha validez discriminante se analiza mediante dos métodos (Gefen & Straub, 2005). Por un lado, un método para evaluar la existencia de validez discriminante es el criterio de Fornell y Larcker (1981). Este método establece que el constructo deber estar formado con más varianza de sus indicadores que cualquier otro constructo. Para corroborar este requisito, la raíz cuadrada de la AVE de cada constructo debe ser mayor que sus correlaciones con cualquier otro constructo. Esta condición se cumple para todos los constructos en relación con sus otras variables (ver Tabla 3). La segunda opción para la verificación de la validez discriminante, se realiza examinando las cargas transversales de los indicadores. Este método es considerado a menudo menos restrictivo que el anterior (Henseler, Ringle & Sinkovics, 2009), y requiere que las cargas de cada indicador en su constructo sean más altas que las cargas cruzadas en otros constructos, como así ocurre en la Tabla 2.

 

 

rc

a

AVE

Competitividad

Implantación

Integración

Motivaciones

SG previos

Competitividad

0.971

0.968

0.675

0.822

 

 

 

 

Implantación

0.930

0.905

0.728

0.335

0.853

 

 

 

Integración

0.948

0.931

0.786

0.376

0.713

0.887

 

 

motivaciones

0.926

0.907

0.643

0.308

0.415

0.390

0.802

 

SG previos

0.925

0.878

0.804

0.453

0.616

0.756

0.350

0.896

Tabla 3. Fiabilidad compuesta (c), coeficientes de validez convergente y discriminante

 

4.1.2. Análisis del modelo estructural

Una vez que la fiabilidad y la validez del modelo de medida han sido establecidas, deben tomarse varios pasos con objeto de evaluar las relaciones hipotéticas dentro del modelo estructural (Hair Jr et al., 2014), el cual evalúa el peso y la magnitud de las relaciones entre los distintos constructos.

La bondad del ajuste del modelo es comprobada a través del análisis del estadístico de la t de Student, el nivel de significación de los parámetros path (β) y el valor R2 para cada constructo dependiente y la prueba de Stone-Geisser (Q2), que consiste en una validación cruzada del modelo evaluando en qué medida los parámetros estimados son útiles para predecir las variables observadas correspondientes a estos constructos (Roldán & Sánchez-Franco, 2012).

Así en primer lugar, se aceptarán aquellos coeficientes path, y por extensión las hipótesis planteadas, que sean significativos según una distribución t de Student de una cola con n-1 grados de libertad (Roldán & Sánchez-Franco, 2012). Estos valores, según Chin (1998) deben ser al menos de 0.2 e idealmente superar el valor 0.3, por tanto si β <0.2 no hay causalidad y la hipótesis se rechaza (Ramírez-Correa, 2014), en el presente caso todos los β son mayores de 0.2 (ver Tabla 4). De acuerdo con Hair et al. (2012) se utilizó un bootstrapping (5,000 remuestras) para generar los estadísticos t-Student y su errores estándar, lo que nos permitió evaluar la significación estadística de los coeficientes path (Castro & Roldán, 2013) y contrastar las hipótesis, como se observa en la Tabla 4.

Hipótesis

b

Standard Error

t-Student

Aceptada

H1

Motivaciones->Implantación

0.227

0.087

2.587

SI**

H2a

SG Previos ->Implantación

0.536

0.100

5.342

SI***

H2b

SG Previos -> Integración

0.511

0.116

4.404

SI***

H3

Implantación->Integración

0.398

0.113

3.507

SI***

H4

Integración->Competitividad

0.376

0.114

3.290

SI***

Nota: t(0.05, 4999) = 1.645158499, t(0.01. 4999) = 2.327094067, t(0.001, 4999) = 3.091863446

* p < 0.05.

** p < 0.01.

*** p < 0.001.

ns. No significativo, basado en t (4999), test de una-cola.

Tabla 4. Contraste de hipótesis planteadas

 

En segundo lugar, se analiza la varianza explicada. La bondad de un modelo se determina a través de la fortaleza de cada relación estructural y se analiza utilizando el valor de R2 para cada constructo dependiente. Según Falk y Miller, (Falk & Miller, 1992), estos valores deben ser superiores a 0.1 para poder considerar que el modelo tiene suficiente capacidad predictiva. Así pues, considerando que el R2 es una medida de la exactitud del modelo (Hair Jr et al., 2014), y que por tanto mide la cantidad de varianza del constructo que es explicada por el modelo (Serrano-Cinca, Fuertes‐Callén & Gutiérrez‐Nieto, 2007) con los valores 0.75, 0.50, 0.25, respectivamente, se describen los niveles sustanciales, moderados o débiles de la exactitud de la predicción (Hair Jr et al., 2014; Henseler et al., 2009), como se puede observar en la Figura 2, todos los R2 están entre el 0.1 y el 0.75, por lo que tienen una capacidad predictiva en diferente grado.

Finalmente, el test de Stone-Giesser (Q2) se usa como criterio para medir la relevancia predictiva de los constructos dependientes (Wang et al., 2015; Roldán & Sánchez-Franco, 2012); y, por tanto, es un medio para evaluar la relevancia predictiva del modelo estructural (Hair Jr et al., 2014). Para modelos reflexivos se utiliza el índice de redundancia de validez cruzada (Q2) (Castro & Roldán, 2013). Si Q2 es mayor que 0 esto implica que el modelo tiene relevancia predictiva (Hair Jr et al., 2014), en nuestro caso todos los Q2 obtenidos tienen signo positivo y son mayores que 0, como se puede apreciar en la Figura 2.

 

 

Figura 2. Contraste del modelo de hipótesis propuesto

 

5. Resultados y discusión

Los resultados obtenidos confirman las relaciones establecidas en el modelo de investigación y que el modelo estructural tiene una relevancia predictiva satisfactoria para las tres variables dependientes: la implantación de RSC y la integración real de la RSC en la organización y la competitividad de la empresa, pudiéndose por tanto afirmar que todas las hipótesis planteadas son aceptadas.

Sin embargo, el modelo de hipótesis no refleja todas las relaciones existentes, por lo que en la tabla siguiente se reflejan todos los resultados (tanto directos como indirectos), en dicha tabla se puede observar que la relación entre los Sistemas de gestión previos y la competitividad es significativa, sin embargo, las relaciones 5 y 6 y 7 no cumplen en el 0.2 mínimo de β y por tanto no se consideran.

 

Relaciones

β

Standard Error

T Student

Nivel de significación

H1

Motivaciones->Implantación

0.227

0.087

2,587

**

H2a

SG Previos ->Implantación

0.536

0,100

5,342

***

H2b

SG Previos -> Integración

0.51 1

0.116

4,404

***

H3

Implantación->Integración

0.398

0.113

3,507

***

H4

Integración->Competitividad Percibida

0.376

0.114

3,290

***

5

Implantación -> Competitividad

0.149

0.0672

2.2304

*

6

Motivaciones -> Competitividad Percibida

0.034

0.0237

1.4364

ns

7

Motivaciones -> Integración

0.090

0.0453

1.9979

*

8

SG Previos -> Competitividad Percibida

0.272

0.0917

2.9742

**

Nota: t(0.05, 4999) = 1.645158499, t(0.01. 4999) = 2.327094067, t(0.001, 4999) = 3.091863446

* p < 0.05. ** p < 0.01. *** p < 0.001. ns. No significativo, basado en t (4999), test de una-cola

Tabla 5. Efectos totales (directos e indirectos)

 

A pesar de que la hipótesis H1 confirma que existen motivaciones para implantar la RSC en empresas tecnológicas están son sólo de tipo externo no existiendo de tipo interno como sugieren Graafland y Schouten (2012). Se encontró una falta de correlación con respecto a algunas variables observables (p.e. MO1, MO2, MO3, MO5), a pesar de ser considerado componentes fundamentales de las estrategias de RSC por parte de la literatura (Marín et al., 2012), estas cuestiones no parecen importantes para las empresas que operan en la industria tecnológica en línea con otros estudios (Battaglia et al., 2014). Esta circunstancia está aparentemente vinculada con el hecho de que el tamaño más habitual de las empresas analizadas son micro y pequeñas empresas pues los indicadores que no figuran entre los validados son aquellos relacionados con los trabajadores. Por tanto, se abriría aquí una posible línea de investigación entre la RSC y el factor humano en las empresas de ámbito tecnológico.

En referencia a los Sistemas de Gestión Previos (H2), los resultados si confirman lo sugerido por otros autores en cuanto a que dichos sistemas implantados en la organización son facilitadores de la integración de la RSC y tienen efectos indirectos positivos (Battaglia et al., 2014) y significativos sobre la competitividad (ver Tabla 5).

Una vez que se han adoptados medias de RSC esta son asumidas por la organización y se puede usar para reforzar la estrategia corporativa, tal y como sugieren Isaksson, Kiessling y Harvey (2014) ya que se produce una integración real (H3) y significativa, por lo que la RSC forma parte de un intangible estratégico en línea con otros estudios (Bocquet et al., 2013) que contribuye a la innovación y la competitividad de la empresa tecnológica.

Por otro lado se confirma la relación existente entre la RSC y la competitividad percibida de la empresa tecnológica planteada en la hipótesis H4 en línea con otros estudios (Hockerts, 2015). De hecho, hay ciertos factores (p.e. COM6, COM7,COM8, COM13,COM14, COM15, COM21,COM24 y COM25) que contribuyen a dicha relación como sugieren Hockerts (2015) y Turyakira et al. (2014). Al contrario de lo que cabria esperar por estos estudios (Turyakira et al., 2014) otros factores no contribuyen a la competitividad de la empresa tecnológica, (p.e. COM26 y COM27), destacando entre ellos el COM3 “Mejora el acceso a la financiación”, en contradicción con lo planteado por Quintana García et al. (2013) y lo establecido por Battaglia et al. (2014). Así pues, seria necesario establecer una línea futura de investigación que llevará a estudiar el efecto de la RSC y el performance financiero-económico en línea con lo sugerido por algunos autores (Boulouta & Pitelis, 2014; Pamiés & Jiménez, 2011; Van Beurden & Gössling, 2008).

6. Conclusiones

En el presente estudio, el objetivo ha sido examinar las motivaciones de implantar RSC en empresas tecnológicas, su implantación e integración y su efecto en la competitividad de dichas empresas a través de la aplicación de un modelo predictivo y un análisis estadístico, pues, el estudio del papel de las empresas tecnológicas en la gestión ambiental, la sostenibilidad y en la RSC está aún en sus etapas iníciales (Wang et al., 2015).

A través del estudio realizado, se pretende cubrir el vacío detectado sobre las motivaciones en empresas tecnológicas para la implantación de medidas de RSC, ya que si bien existen estudios previos sobre motivaciones para la RSC, su integración y los resultados en empresas españolas, estos lo hacen desde un punto de vista regional (Gallardo-Vázquez & Sanchez-Hernandez, 2014; Vintró, Fortuny, Sanmiquel, Freijo & Edo, 2012) o analizando un único aspecto de dicha relación (Prado-Lorenzo et al., 2008). Así pues, la ausencia de trabajos empíricos previos que analicen las motivaciones de la RSC en el sector de la tecnología en España, su integración en la empresa y su efecto sobre la competitividad, justificó su realización y se considera que viene a añadir un suplemento investigador a los estudios que relacionan la RSC y su integración en las empresas, pues dicha relación no se estudia con un efecto directo únicamente, sino que se ha encontrado una relación indirecta a través de los sistemas de gestión previos como variable de mediación parcial sobre la competitividad.

Este estudio propone un modelo que explica las medidas de RSC en empresas tecnologías y su influencia en la competitividad de dichas empresas. El modelo revela que el constructo (Integración de la RSC) tiene una influencia significativa en la competitividad. Para demostrar esto último se han planteado una serie de hipótesis a través de constructos o variables latentes, las cuales no son directamente observables y se han asumido que las relaciones entre ellas son complejas. El modelo ha siso estimado mediante la técnica SEM y ha sido probado usando una muestra de empresas tecnologías españolas.

Los resultados obtenidos muestran que las motivaciones (en este caso, externas), los sistemas de gestión previamente adoptados por las empresas y la implantación de medias de RSC están relacionados entre sí, de tal manera que los sistemas de gestión previos y la implantación de medidas de RSC median significativamente en el efecto de la integración real de la RSC en la organización y esta a su vez tiene un efecto directo sobre la competitividad percibida. En consecuencia, los resultados tienen implicaciones tanto teóricas como prácticas.

Así, la validación del modelo podrá ayudar a emprendedores tecnológicos y directivos a entender porqué deberían prestar atención a las cuestiones de RSC y qué se espera de los esfuerzos que realizan hacia el desarrollo medioambiental y social de su organización, más allá del puro desarrollo económico.

Desde un punto de vista práctico las empresas tecnológicas pueden utilizar los resultados de este estudio como un punto de apoyo para potenciar la integración de la RSC en su estrategia corporativa a través de medidas concretas de RSC como la formación de sus trabajadores, el conocimiento sostenible y la comunicación con los stakeholders entre otros y aprovechar las sinergias en la gestión creadas entre los sistemas de gestión normalizados y la RSC, pues la integración de la RSC en empresas tecnológicas, como ha quedado demostrado, tiene una relación directa con la competitividad en línea con otros estudios (De Vries, Terwel, Ellemers & Daamen, 2015; Gallardo-Vázquez & Sanchez-Hernandez, 2014; Swanson & Zhang, 2012).

A pesar de las aportaciones de este trabajo, también tiene algunas limitaciones. En primer lugar, mientras que el hecho de que la muestra se restringe a empresas en España podría ser visto como una falta de generalización de los resultados, también es cierto que nuestros resultados son consistentes con la literatura y los resultados de estudios anteriores extraídos de muestras no españolas (por ejemplo Turyakira et al., 2014 ; Hur et al., 2014), que apoya claramente la validez de nuestros resultados más allá de las fronteras españolas. Además, el presente estudio tiene un enfoque de modelado asociativo, puesto que va dirigido más hacia la predicción de la causalidad. Mientras que la causalidad garantiza la capacidad de controlar los eventos, la asociación (predicción) sólo permite un grado limitado de control (Falk & Miller, 1992).

En segundo lugar, otra limitación se encuentra determinada por la técnica utilizada para el modelo propuesto: ecuaciones estructurales, que asume una linealidad de las relaciones entre las variables latentes (Castro & Roldán, 2013).

En tercer lugar, las empresas tecnológicas son organizaciones dinámicas que cambian con el tiempo. En consecuencia, la investigación futura de las mismas debería medir los constructos analizados a lo largo de varios periodos de tiempo, teniendo en cuenta la dinámica para configurar las diferentes dimensiones de la RSC.

Sin embargo, dadas las limitaciones indicadas anteriormente, el trabajo tiene que ser visto como pionero, ya que representa un punto de partida para los aspectos de la RSC en cualquier empresa tecnológica y cubre el hueco detectado en la literatura. Por tanto, como futuras líneas de investigación se propone poner a prueba un modelo estructural que analizará la relación causal entre la orientación de las empresas tecnológicas hacia la RSC y el performance económico. Los resultados de ese modelo indicarán si la estrategia de RSC, o en una medida importante, explicarían el éxito competitivo y su relación con el performance. Si es así, sería una estrategia interesante para las empresas tecnológicas que la desarrollen determinar cuál es:

  • la intención estratégica de la RSC;

  • participar en la RSC para obtener un beneficio específico;

  • abordar la RSC como una inversión en activos intangibles;

  • centrase en una categoría específica de las partes interesadas (por ejemplo, clientes, empleados, proveedores, etc.);

  • decidir cómo comunicar las iniciativas RSC; y

  • diseñar y gestionar el proceso de toma de decisiones de la RSC.

 

Referencias

Albahari, A., Catalano, G., & Landoni, P. (2013). Evaluation of national science park systems: A theoretical framework and its application to the Italian and Spanish systems. Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, 25(5), 599-614. https:/doi.org/10.1080/09537325.2013.785508

Alcaraz, A.S., & Rodenas, S.P. (2013). The Spanish Banks in face of the Corporate Social Responsibility Standards: Previous analysis of the financial crisis. Review of Business Management, 15(49), 562-581. https:/doi.org/10.7819/rbgn.v15i49.1386

Apospori, E., Zografos, K.G., & Magrizos, S. (2012). SME corporate social responsibility and competitiveness: A literature review. International Journal of Technology Management, 58(1/2), 10-31. https:/doi.org/10.1504/IJTM.2012.045786

Arevalo, J.A., Aravind, D., Ayuso, S., & Roca, M. (2013). The Global Compact: an analysis of the motivations of adoption in the Spanish context. Business Ethics: A European Review, 22(1), 1-15. https:/doi.org/10.1111/beer.12005

Asif, M., Searcy, C., Zutshi, A., & Ahmad, N. (2011). An integrated management systems approach to corporate sustainability. European Business Review, 23(4), 353-367. https:/doi.org/10.1108/09555341111145744

Asif, M., Searcy, C., Zutshi, A., & Fisscher, O.A.M. (2013). An integrated management systems approach to corporate social responsibility. Journal of Cleaner Production, 56, 7-17. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2011.10.034

Bagozzi, R.P., & Yi, Y. (2011). Specification, evaluation, and interpretation of structural equation models. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 40(1), 8-34. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s11747-011-0278-x

Battaglia, M., Testa, F., Bianchi, L., Iraldo, F., & Frey, M. (2014). Corporate Social Responsibility and Competitiveness within SMEs of the Fashion Industry: Evidence from Italy and France. Sustainability, 6(2), 872-893. https:/doi.org/10.3390/su6020872

Baumann-Pauly, D., Wickert, C., Spence, L.J., & Scherer, A.G. (2013). Organizing Corporate Social Responsibility in Small and Large Firms: Size Matters. Journal of Business Ethics, 115(4), 693-705. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-013-1827-7

Benito Hernández, S., & Esteban Sánchez, P. (2012). La influencia de las políticas de responsabilidad social y la pertenencia a redes de cooperación en el capital relacional y estructural de las microempresas. Investigaciones Europeas de Dirección y Economía de la Empresa, 18(2), 166-176. https:/doi.org/10.1016/S1135-2523(12)70007-2

Bernal Conesa, J.A., De Nieves Nieto, C., & Briones Peñalver, A.J. (2014). Implantación de la Responsabilidad Social en la Administración Pública: El caso de las Fuerzas Armadas Españolas. Revista de Responsabilidad Social de la Empresa, 18(III), 101-124.

Bernardo, M. (2014). Integration of management systems as an innovation: a proposal for a new model. Journal of Cleaner Production, 82, 132-142. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2014.06.089

Bernardo, M., Casadesus, M., Karapetrovic, S., & Heras, I. (2012). Integration of standardized management systems: Does the implementation order matter?. International Journal of Operations & Production Management, 32(3), 291-307. https:/doi.org/10.1108/01443571211212583

Bernardo, M., Simon, A., Tarí, J.J., & Molina-Azorín, J.F. (2015). Benefits of Management Systems integration: A literature review. Journal of Cleaner Production. Retrieved February 17, 2015, from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959652615000803 https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2015.01.075

Van Beurden, P., & Gössling, T. (2008). The Worth of Values - A Literature Review on the Relation Between Corporate Social and Financial Performance. Journal of Business Ethics, 82(2), 407-424. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-008-9894-x

Bocquet, R., Le Bas, C., Mothe, C., & Poussing, N. (2013). Are firms with different CSR profiles equally innovative? Empirical analysis with survey data. European Management Journal, 31(6), 642-654. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.emj.2012.07.001

Boulouta, I., & Pitelis, C.N. (2014). Who Needs CSR? The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on National Competitiveness. Journal of Business Ethics, 119(3), 349-364. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-013-1633-2

Carmines, E.G., & Zeller, R.A. (1979). Reliability and Validity Assessment. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications. https:/doi.org/10.4135/9781412985642

Castka, P., & Balzarova, M.A. (2008). Adoption of social responsibility through the expansion of existing management systems. Industrial Management & Data Systems, 108(3-4), 297-309. https:/doi.org/10.1108/02635570810858732

Castro, I., & Roldán, J.L. (2013). A mediation model between dimensions of social capital. International Business Review, 22(6), 1034-1050. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.ibusrev.2013.02.004

Chen, Y.-S., & Chang, C.-H. (2011). Utilize structural equation modeling (SEM) to explore the influence of corporate environmental ethics: The mediation effect of green human capital. Quality & Quantity, 47(1), 79-95. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s11135-011-9504-3

Chin, W.W. (1998). Commentary: Issues and opinion on structural equation modeling. JSTOR. Retrieved April 13, 2015, from: http://www.jstor.org/stable/249674

Chow, W. S., & Chen, Y. (2012). Corporate Sustainable Development: Testing a New Scale Based on the Mainland Chinese Context. Journal of Business Ethics, 105(4), 519-533. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-011-0983-x

Dahlsrud, A. (2008). How corporate social responsibility is defined: An analysis of 37 definitions. Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, 15(1), 1-13. https:/doi.org/10.1002/csr.132

Damanpour, F., & Gopalakrishnan, S. (2001). The dynamics of the adoption of product and process innovations in organizations. Journal of Management Studies, 38(1), 45-65. https:/doi.org/10.1111/1467-6486.00227

De Godos Díez, J.L., Fernández Gago, R., & Cabeza García, L. (2012). Propiedad y control en la puesta en práctica de la RSC. Cuadernos de Economía y Dirección de la Empresa, 15(1), 1-11. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.cede.2011.06.002

De Vries, G., Terwel, B.W., Ellemers, N., & Daamen, D.D.L. (2015). Sustainability or Profitability? How Communicated Motives for Environmental Policy Affect Public Perceptions of Corporate Greenwashing. Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, 22(3), 142-154. https:/doi.org/10.1002/csr.1327

Díez, J.L.G., & Gago, R.F. (2011). ¿Cómo se percibe la dirección socialmente responsable por parte de los altos directivos de empresas en España?. Universia Business Review, (29), 32-49.

Dijkstra, T.K., & Henseler, J. (2015). Consistent and asymptotically normal PLS estimators for linear structural equations. Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, 81, 10-23.  https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.csda.2014.07.008

Falk, R.F., & Miller, N.B. (1992). A Primer for Soft Modeling (1st edition.). Akron, Ohio: Univ of Akron Pr.

Fornell, C., & Larcker, D. (1981). Evaluating Structural Equation Models with Unobservable Variables and Measurement Error. Journal of Marketing Research, 18(1), 39-50. https:/doi.org/10.2307/3151312

Gallardo-Vázquez, D., & Sanchez-Hernandez, M.I. (2014). Measuring Corporate Social Responsibility for competitive success at a regional level. Journal of Cleaner Production, 72, 14-22. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2014.02.051

García-Sánchez, I.-M., Frías-Aceituno, J.-V., & Rodríguez-Domínguez, L. (2013). Determinants of corporate social disclosure in Spanish local governments. Journal of Cleaner Production, 39, 60-72. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2012.08.037

Gefen, D., Rigdon, E.E., & Straub, D. (2011). An Update and Extension to SEM Guidelines for Administrative and Social Science Research. Mis Quarterly, 35(2), III-XIV.

Gefen, D., & Straub, D. (2005). A practical guide to factorial validity using PLS-Graph: Tutorial and annotated example. Communications of the Association for Information systems, 16(1), 5.

Goldsmith, S. (2010). The Power of Social Innovation: How Civic Entrepreneurs Ignite Community Networks for Good. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Graafland, J., & Schouten, C.M.-V. Der D. (2012). Motives for Corporate Social Responsibility. De Economist, 160(4), 377-396. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10645-012-9198-5

Guadamillas-Gómez, F.J., Donate-Manzanares, M., & Skerlavaj, M. (2010). The integration of corporate social responsibility into the strategy of technology-intensive firms: A case study. Zbornik radova Ekonomskog fakulteta u Rijeci: \vcasopis za ekonomsku teoriju i praksu, 28(1), 9-34.

Hair, J. F., Sarstedt, M., Ringle, C.M., & Mena, J.A. (2012). An assessment of the use of partial least squares structural equation modeling in marketing research. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 40(3), 414-433. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s11747-011-0261-6

Hair Jr, J.F., Sarstedt, M., Hopkins, L., & Kuppelwieser, V.G. (2014). Partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM): An emerging tool in business research. European Business Review, 26(2), 106-121. https:/doi.org/10.1108/EBR-10-2013-0128

Hammann, E.-M., Habisch, A., & Pechlaner, H. (2009). Values that create value: socially responsible business practices in SMEs - empirical evidence from German companies. Business Ethics: A European Review, 18(1), 37-51. https:/doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8608.2009.01547.x

Henseler, J., Dijkstra, T.K., Sarstedt, M., Ringle, C.M., Diamantopoulos, A., Straub, D. W. et al. (2014). Common Beliefs and Reality About PLS: Comments on Ronnkko and Evermann (2013). Organizational Research Methods, 17(2), 182-209. https:/doi.org/10.1177/1094428114526928

Henseler, J., Ringle, C.M., & Sinkovics, R.R. (2009). The use of partial least squares path modeling in international marketing. New Challenges to International Marketing, Advances in International Marketing, 1-0(20), 277-319. Emerald Group Publishing Limited. Retrieved April 9, 2015, from: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/S1474-7979(2009)0000020014

Herrera, J., Larrán, M., & Martínez-Martínez, D. (2013). Relación entre responsabilidad social y performance en las pequeñas y medianas empresas: Revisión bibliográfica. Cuadernos de Gestión, 13(2), 39-65. https:/doi.org/10.5295/cdg.120360jh

Hillenbrand, C., Money, K., & Ghobadian, A. (2013). Unpacking the Mechanism by which Corporate Responsibility Impacts Stakeholder Relationships. British Journal of Management, 24(1), 127-146. https:/doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8551.2011.00794.x

Hockerts, K. (2015). A Cognitive Perspective on the Business Case for Corporate Sustainability: A Cognitive Perspective of the Business Case. Business Strategy and the Environment, 24(2), 102-122. https:/doi.org/10.1002/bse.1813

Homburg, C., & Stebel, P. (2009). Determinants of contract terms for professional services. Management Accounting Research, 20(2), 129-145. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.mar.2008.10.001

Hur, W.-M., Kim, H., & Woo, J. (2014). How CSR Leads to Corporate Brand Equity: Mediating Mechanisms of Corporate Brand Credibility and Reputation. Journal of Business Ethics, 125(1), 75-86. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-013-1910-0

Isaksson, L., Kiessling, T., & Harvey, M. (2014). Corporate social responsibility: Why bother?. Organizational Dynamics, 43(1), 64-72. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.orgdyn.2013.10.008

Janssen, C., Sen, S., & Bhattacharya, C. (2015). Corporate crises in the age of corporate social responsibility. Business Horizons, Emerging Issues In Crisis Management, 58(2), 183-192. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.bushor.2014.11.002

Jimenez-Zarco, A.I., Cerdan-Chiscano, M., & Torrent-Sellens, J. (2013). Challenges and Opportunities in the Management of Science Parks: design of a tool based on the analysis of resident companies. Review of Business Management. Retrieved February 10, 2014, from; http://apps.webofknowledge.com/InboundService.do?SID=P26vG5IkeT12mbD3PbS&product=WOS&UT=000327498300003&SrcApp=CR&DestFail=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.webofknowledge.com&Init=Yes&action=retrieve&Func=Frame&customersID=PCS&IsProductCode=Yes&mode=FullRecord https:/doi.org/10.7819/rbgn.v15i48.1503

Karapetrovic, S., & Casadesús, M. (2009). Implementing environmental with other standardized management systems: Scope, sequence, time and integration. Journal of Cleaner Production, 17(5), 533540. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2008.09.006

Law, K.M.Y., & Gunasekaran, A. (2012). Sustainability development in high-tech manufacturing firms in Hong Kong: Motivators and readiness. International Journal of Production Economics, 137(1), 116-125. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2012.01.022

Lee, E.M., Park, S.-Y., & Lee, H.J. (2013). Employee perception of CSR activities: Its antecedents and consequences. Journal of Business Research, 66(10), 1716-1724. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2012.11.008

Lindgreen, A., Antioco, M., Palmer, R., & Van Heesch, T. (2009). High-tech, innovative products: identifying and meeting business customers’ value needs. Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, 24(3/4), 182-197. https:/doi.org/10.1108/08858620910939732

Lorenzo, J.M.P., Sánchez, I.M.G., & Álvarez, I.G. (2009). Características del consejo de administración e información en materia de responsabilidad social corporativa. Revista española de financiación y contabilidad, (141), 107-135. https:/doi.org/10.1080/02102412.2009.10779664

Luna Sotorrío, L., & Fernández Sánchez, J.L. (2010). Corporate social reporting for different audiences: the case of multinational corporations in Spain. Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, 17(5), 272-283. https:/doi.org/10.1002/csr.215

Marín, L., Rubio, A., & De Maya, S.R. (2012). Competitiveness as a Strategic Outcome of Corporate Social Responsibility: Competitiveness and CSR. Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, 19(6), 364-376. https:/doi.org/10.1002/csr.1288

Martínez-Campillo, A., Cabeza-García, L., & Marbella-Sánchez, F. (2013). Responsabilidad social corporativa y resultado financiero: Evidencia sobre la doble dirección de la causalidad en el sector de las Cajas de Ahorros. Cuadernos de Economía y Dirección de la Empresa, 16(1), 54-68. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.cede.2012.04.005

Melé, D., Argandoña, A., & Sanchez-Runde, C. (2011). Facing the Crisis: Toward a New Humanistic Synthesis for Business. Journal of Business Ethics, 99(1), 1-4. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-011-0743-y

Melé, D., Debeljuh, P., & Arruda, M.C. (2006). Corporate Ethical Policies in Large Corporations in Argentina, Brazil and Spain. Journal of Business Ethics, 63(1), 21-38. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-005-7100-y

Mendoza, S., De Nieves, C., & Briones, A.J. (2010). Capacidades Empresariales en Responsabilidad Social y Cooperación en los Agronegocios de la Región de Murcia.

Moseñe, J.A., Burritt, R.L., Sanagustín, M.V., Moneva, J.M., & Tingey-Holyoak, J. (2013). Environmental reporting in the Spanish wind energy sector: An institutional view. Journal of Cleaner Production, 40, 199-211. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2012.08.023

Nunnally, J.C., & Bernstein, I.H. (1994). Psychometric Theory (3rd edition.). New York: McGraw-Hill.

Pamiés, D.S., & Jiménez, J.A. (2011). La naturaleza de la relación entre la responsabilidad social de la empresa (RSE) y el resultado financiero. Revista europea de dirección y economía de la empresa, 20(4), 161176.

Pavlou, P.A., & El Sawy, O.A. (2006). From IT Leveraging Competence to Competitive Advantage in Turbulent Environments: The Case of New Product Development. Information Systems Research, 17(3), 198-227. https:/doi.org/10.1287/isre.1060.0094

Pérez, A., & Del Bosque, I.R. (2012). Measuring CSR Image: Three Studies to Develop and to Validate a Reliable Measurement Tool. Journal of Business Ethics, 118(2), 265-286. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-012-1588-8

Pérez Ruiz, A., & Rodríguez Del Bosque, I. (2012). La imagen de Responsabilidad Social Corporativa en un contexto de crisis económica: El caso del sector financiero en España. Universia Business Review, 33, 14-29.

Perrini, F., Russo, A., & Tencati, A. (2007). CSR Strategies of SMEs and Large Firms. Evidence from Italy. Journal of Business Ethics, 74(3), 285-300. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-006-9235-x

Prado-Lorenzo, J.-M., Gallego-Álvarez, I., García-Sánchez, I.-M., & Rodríguez-Domínguez, L. (2008). Social responsibility in Spain: Practices and motivations in firms. Management Decision, 46(8), 12471271. https:/doi.org/10.1108/00251740810901417

Prahalad, C.K. & Ramaswamy, V. (2004). Co‐creating unique value with customers. Strategy & Leadership, 32(3), 4-9. https:/doi.org/10.1108/10878570410699249

Prajogo, D., Tang, A.K.Y., & Lai, K. (2012). Do firms get what they want from ISO 14001 adoption?: An Australian perspective. Journal of Cleaner Production, 33, 117-126.  https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2012.04.019

Quintana García, C., Benavides Velasco, C.A., & Guzmán Parra, V.F. (2013). Capacidades de investigación y directivas: señales informativas en la salida a bolsa de las empresas de base tecnológica. Cuadernos de Economía y Dirección de la Empresa, 16(4), 270-280. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.cede.2013.06.005

Ramírez-Correa, P. (2014). Uso de internet móvil en Chile: Explorando los antecedentes de su aceptación a nivel individual. Ingeniare. Revista chilena de ingeniería, 22(4), 560-566. https:/doi.org/10.4067/S0718-33052014000400011

Ramos, M.I.G., Manzanares, M.J.D., & Gómez, F.G. (2014). El efecto del papel mediador de la reputación corporativa en la relación entre la rsc y los resultados económicos. Revista de Estudios Empresariales. Segunda Época, (1). Retrieved March 12, 2015, from: http://revistaselectronicas.ujaen.es/index.php/REE/article/view/1378

Ratinho, T., & Henriques, E. (2010). The role of science parks and business incubators in converging countries: Evidence from Portugal. Technovation, 30(4), 278-290.  https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.technovation.2009.09.002

Reinartz, W., Haenlein, M., & Henseler, J. (2009). An empirical comparison of the efficacy of covariance-based and variance-based SEM. International Journal of Research in Marketing, 26(4), 332344. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.ijresmar.2009.08.001

Rigdon, E.E. (2014). Rethinking Partial Least Squares Path Modeling: Breaking Chains and Forging Ahead. Long Range Planning, Rethinking Partial Least Squares Path Modeling: Looking Back and Moving Forward, 47(3), 161-167. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.lrp.2014.02.003

Rives, L.M., & Bañón, A.R. (2008). La responsabilidad social corporativa como determinante del éxito competitivo: Un análisis empírico. Revista europea de dirección y economía de la empresa, 17(3), 27-42.

Rodríguez Gutiérrez, P., Fuentes García, F.J., & Sánchez Cañizares, S. (2013). Revelación de información sobre clientes, comunidad, empleados y medio ambiente en las entidades financieras españolas a través de las memorias de responsabilidad social corporativa (2007-2010). Investigaciones Europeas de Dirección y Economía de la Empresa, 19(3), 180-187. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.iedee.2012.12.002

Roldán, J.L., & Sánchez-Franco, M.J. (2012). Variance-Based Structural Equation Modeling: Guidelines for Using Partial Least Squares. Research methodologies, innovations and philosophies in software systems engineering and information systems, 193-221. https:/doi.org/10.4018/978-1-4666-0179-6.ch010

Serrano‐Cinca, C., Fuertes‐Callén, Y., & Gutiérrez‐Nieto, B. (2007). Online reporting by banks: A structural modelling approach. Online Information Review, 31(3), 310-332.  https:/doi.org/10.1108/14684520710764096

Simon, A., Karapetrovic, S., & Casadesús, M. (2012). Difficulties and benefits of integrated management systems. Industrial Management & Data Systems, 112(5), 828-846.  https:/doi.org/10.1108/02635571211232406

Spence, L.J. (2007). CSR and Small Business in a European Policy Context: The Five “C”s of CSR and Small Business Research Agenda 2007. Business and Society Review, 112(4), 533-552. https:/doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8594.2007.00308.x

Suñe, A., Bravo, E., Mundet, J., & Herrera, L. (2012). Buenas prácticas de innovación: Un estudio exploratorio de empresas tecnológicas en el sector audiovisual español. Investigaciones Europeas de Dirección y Economía de la Empresa, 18(2), 139-147. https:/doi.org/10.1016/S1135-2523(12)70004-7

Swanson, L.A., & Zhang, D.D. (2012). Perspectives on corporate responsibility and sustainable development. Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, 23(6), 630-639.  https:/doi.org/10.1108/14777831211262918

Tenenhaus, M., Vinzi, V.E., Chatelin, Y.M., & Lauro, C. (2005). PLS path modeling. Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, 48(1), 159-205. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.csda.2004.03.005

Turyakira, P., Venter, E., & Smith, E. (2014). The impact of corporate social responsibility factors on the competitiveness of small and medium-sized enterprises. South African Journal of Economic and Management Sciences, 17(2), 157-172.

Vásquez-Urriago, Á.R., Barge-Gil, A., & Rico, A.M. (2012). Los parques científicos y tecnológicos españoles, impulsores de la cooperación en innovación. ICE: Revista de Economía, 869, 99-114.

Vásquez-Urriago, Á.R., Barge-Gil, A., Rico, A.M., & Paraskevopoulou, E. (2014). The impact of science and technology parks on firms’ product innovation: empirical evidence from Spain. Journal of Evolutionary Economics, 24, 835-873. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s00191-013-0337-1

Vázquez, D.G., & Sánchez, M.I. (2013). Análisis de la incidencia de la responsabilidad social empresarial en el éxito competitivo de las microempresas y el papel de la innovación. Universia Business Review, 38, 14-31.

Vázquez-Carrasco, R., & López-Pérez, M.E. (2013). Small & medium-sized enterprises and Corporate Social Responsibility: A systematic review of the literature. Quality & Quantity, 47(6), 3205-3218. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s11135-012-9713-4

Vidales, K.B.V., & Ortiz, D.A.A. (2014). Responsabilidad social de las empresas agrícolas y agroindustriales aguacateras de Uruapan, Michoacán, y sus implicaciones en la competitividad. Contaduría y Administración, 59(4), 223-251. https:/doi.org/10.1016/S0186-1042(14)70161-5

Vilanova, M., Lozano, J.M., & Arenas, D. (2009). Exploring the Nature of the Relationship Between CSR and Competitiveness. Journal of Business Ethics, 87(S1), 57-69. https:/doi.org/10.1007/s10551-008-9812-2

Vintró, C., Fortuny, J., Sanmiquel, L., Freijo, M., & Edo, J. (2012). Is corporate social responsibility possible in the mining sector? Evidence from Catalan companies. Resources Policy, 37(1), 118-125. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.resourpol.2011.10.003

Vinzi, V.E., Chin, W.W., Henseler, J., & Wang, H. (2010). Handbook of Partial Least Squares: Concepts, Methods and Applications. Springer Science & Business Media. Berlin: Springer.

Von Ahsen, A. (2014). The Integration of Quality, Environmental and Health and Safety Management by Car Manufacturers – a Long-Term Empirical Study. Business Strategy and the Environment, 23(6), 395-416. https:/doi.org/10.1002/bse.1791

Waddock, S. (2004). Parallel Universes: Companies, Academics, and the Progress of Corporate Citizenship. Business and Society Review, 109(1), 5-42. https:/doi.org/10.1111/j.0045-3609.2004.00002.x

Wang, Y., Chen, Y., & Benitez-Amado, J. (2015). How information technology influences environmental performance: Empirical evidence from China. International Journal of Information Management, 35(2), 160-170. https:/doi.org/10.1016/j.ijinfomgt.2014.11.005

 




Licencia de Creative Commons 

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Intangible Capital, 2004-2019

Online ISSN: 1697-9818; Print ISSN: 2014-3214; DL: B-33375-2004

Publisher: OmniaScience